Launching Tips - RC Groups
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Nov 10, 2017, 08:34 PM
DFC~ We Do Flyin' Right
Vapor Trails's Avatar
Discussion

Launching Tips


So I am still having some trouble launching the Oxy1.5.
I am able to get it in the air, but not at all with the same ease I see others experiencing.

It flies sooo great once it is up in the air, I am hesitant to alter the brake lines... should I be? Is that what is hindering my launch performance?

The canopy never pops up and overhead like I see other PPGs do. Mine will fill, but stays low and behind me. It does not "get on the wing" unless the pilot is released real low, and even then it pendulums like mad trying to catch the canopy up to the pilot.


I am welcome to any guidance and advice
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Nov 10, 2017, 10:00 PM
Registered User
Hi Vapor,

I just completed my second season on my Hacker FREE. I'm self-taught on these wings. Kinda' like I learned to fly basic RC all those years ago. Here's my thoughts:

I watched lots of vids of people launching. I tried to duplicate. It takes practice...lots of practice to get proficient. Broke a handful of props on bad launches when my cage flexed.

My procedure. Fly in a little wind. Maybe 3-5 mph especially with your 1.5. I am right-handed so I lay my wing out flat with the leading edge at the REAR so when I pull, the leading edge pops up first since the lines are shorter. I stand with my right shoulder into the wind so I don't create a "wind shadow" on my wing. Grab the gondola by the bottom.

I quickly pull toward me and throttle up about half way at the top of my arc. I fully extend my launch arm to get the wing as high overhead as I can then release. Throttle management is different on these things. Have to get the feel for what the wing needs.

Hope there is something here you can use.

Regards,
Dave

Added thoughts: Re-check your brake line adjustment. The first time I set my Hacker up I measured incorrectly. Also experiment with additional weights. Example-I fly with about 9oz of additional lead weights when wind is about 5-7. You may have some guidance in your Oxy instructions. Reduced throttle can help avoid that "dragging my wing around" thing. Let the wing work. Some things with the PPGs seem counterintuitive to us fixed wing types like adding weight and being pretty light on the throttle. A final thought. I found that holding on my turn commands and returning to "neutral" gradually really smoothed things out and reduced the swinging. I've enjoyed the challenge of learning the new skills required with these things.
Last edited by Highride; Nov 10, 2017 at 11:21 PM. Reason: Added comments
Nov 11, 2017, 08:40 AM
RCG Admin
Jason Cole's Avatar
Come on up to Nashville and we’ll work on your form.
Nov 11, 2017, 11:31 AM
DFC~ We Do Flyin' Right
Vapor Trails's Avatar
I appreciate your offer and will take you up on it!


I have been committing my weekends getting packed up for a house move in January, but should open up after the new year. I would LOVE to come fly and learn about PPG

...I''d bet Electrich is up for a road trip as well I'll send you some dates
Nov 11, 2017, 12:59 PM
RCG Admin
Jason Cole's Avatar
Just let me know when you are ready and we'll get it planned out.
Nov 11, 2017, 01:20 PM
Registered User
Check that you have the brakes setup as per the manual. The wing is as a kite, it needs to be pulled horizontally to lift up. Have a look at some paraglider launches on YouTube to see what I mean.
Any paraglider is best launched into whatever wind there is, it stops the wing being blown sideways. Lay the wing out with the leading edge away from the wind.
Stand with your back to the wind. hold the pilot at arms length. The pilot should be at about waist height, the lines should just lift the leading edge of the wing. The pilot should be tilted back, his head pointing at the wing.
Check that all is clear. Ready to launch?
For a right handed person. All in one smooth movement:-
Take a step back, at the same time move you arm up towards your left shoulder
Keeping your arm at shoulder height turn to the left (rotate?).
Keep your arm moving.
Don't lift your arm above your shoulder! the wing will collapse.
Check the wing. The wing should be above the pilot and fully inflated.
Move your arm forward and place the pilot in the air.

If the front of the wing is pushed in you are launching too fast.
If the wing is not above the pilot, the launch is too slow.
if you stop moving the wing will move forward and collapse.

A paraglider is not a fixed wing aircraft.
Do not try to throw it into the air! If you do the wing drags behind, the pilot swings up, the wing stalls, wing deflates, hits ground.

If you have a motor, start the launch with 10% to 20% throttle. After launch move the throttle smoothly to 75% it should climb away.
Move all controls slow and smooth and return under control don't let them snap back.

Hope this helps
Nov 12, 2017, 02:50 PM
Registered User
Be sure to consider the angle of the chassis as you handle it during the launch. If you are holding the chassis relatively level to the ground then the arms are also pulling some brake relative to the canopy still on the ground. Consider pulling the chassis forward into the wind while the chassis nose is pointing up toward the sky. You will see that the angle of the chassis while you are doing that initial pull will make a big difference. This same chassis angle can help keep the wing grounded when handling on a windy day. When you keep the chassis nose tipped forward and level to the ground it is the same as pulling some brakes to keep the wing grounded.

So remember during that initial pull while the wing is grounded the nose of the chassis should be pointing up toward the sky. As you transition to overhead then you should be leveling out the chassis to be parallel to the ground with the wing now above.

I hope that helps.
Jack Zabawa
San Diego, CA
Nov 12, 2017, 06:38 PM
DFC~ We Do Flyin' Right
Vapor Trails's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Cole
Just let me know when you are ready and we'll get it planned out.
Rich lit up at the thought of a Nashville trip! We were talking about sometime mid-January, after the holidays and new year.

...I got to get in as much time as I can now; scheduling flying trips are going to be a little more complicated after the baby gets here [April].

Quote:
Originally Posted by videokahuna
Be sure to consider the angle of the chassis as you handle it during the launch. If you are holding the chassis relatively level to the ground then the arms are also pulling some brake relative to the canopy still on the ground. Consider pulling the chassis forward into the wind while the chassis nose is pointing up toward the sky. You will see that the angle of the chassis while you are doing that initial pull will make a big difference. This same chassis angle can help keep the wing grounded when handling on a windy day. When you keep the chassis nose tipped forward and level to the ground it is the same as pulling some brakes to keep the wing grounded.

So remember during that initial pull while the wing is grounded the nose of the chassis should be pointing up toward the sky. As you transition to overhead then you should be leveling out the chassis to be parallel to the ground with the wing now above.

I hope that helps.
Jack Zabawa
San Diego, CA
Thank you, great advice and I will be mindful of this on my next launches.
Very well said, you really paint a nice picture
Nov 13, 2017, 07:50 AM
RCG Admin
Jason Cole's Avatar
Sounds great


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