Best adhesive for built up wings - RC Groups
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Nov 08, 2017, 10:08 PM
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Discussion

Best adhesive for built up wings


I searched the forum but couldn’t find an answer. I like using medium CA for built up balsa wings. It sucks for sanding CA joined sheeting though. What are other builders using?
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Nov 08, 2017, 10:17 PM
Kurt Zimmerman ≡LSF 4461≡
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When I build a built up I will use Titebond for just about the entire build except for the spar. When I build a spar I’ll use a 30 epoxy. I use very little CA. CA tends to make balsa brittle.

Kurt
Nov 08, 2017, 10:47 PM
Sagitta Fanboy
I'll also use carpenters glue (PVA or Aliphatic, a la Titebond) for most everything. Epoxy for the joiner box, and for the spar if necessary.

I only use CA where absolutely required, as I'm sensitive to the fumes.
Nov 08, 2017, 11:07 PM
Registered User
CA , like a computer, lets you make mistakes faster than ever before. I've heard that Ambroid and similar glues are much easier than others to sand, and therefore suitable for joining sheets if you're going to be sanding them.

In general, TItebond and the like are great for gluing snug joints in wood. I suspect that whit glue is comparable. I have a pennyplane I made years ago with white glue, and it's been quite durable. On small, free flight stuff I use Ambroid, Duco, etc. sometimes, but I don't know how that works out for larger models like sailplanes.

BTW, never build with CA if you're barefoot and the floor is a hard, smooth surface. And if you do, don't drop the bottle where you can step on it, especially if you're alone in the house.

BTW, if you apply yellow carpenter's glue (and, presumably, Titebond) and let it dry, it makes a dandy heat activated adhesive which is good for applying the top sheeting on a d-tube wing. Apply to ribs, temporarily position the sheeting over them, then remove. Wipe up the globs and let dry. Now you can iron on the sheeting. Very durable on the model I used it on.

For applying carbon spar caps, or applying carbon to spar caps, be sure to do good surface prep and use epoxy that's meant as glue. The boatbuilding epoxy I tried once was lousy for this purpose and it was easy to peel the caps off.
Nov 09, 2017, 05:53 AM
supreme being of leisure
ZAGNUT's Avatar
i use elmer's yellow for just about all wood to wood joints and sometimes a bit of epoxy for areas like joiner boxes. some areas like end grain joints can benefit from being "primed" with thinned down glue before applying the actual glue, can go a long way in preventing a dry joint due to the water being sucked out before the glue can do it's job. especially helpful in joints where you can't get good clamping force.

but there are places where CA is king. a carbon to wood joint where it is impossible to use epoxy is the main one. a currently relevant example would be a carbon tube spar through tight holes in ribs.
Nov 09, 2017, 08:19 AM
Registered User
Original formula Titebond , the one with the red label .Also get yourself a Monoject
glue syringe , your LHS should carry them .
Nov 09, 2017, 08:39 AM
Registered User
I use multiple glues depending on the joint. Sheeting joints need something that sands well. Hard to beat old fashioned stinky model glue like sig-ment. PVA glues work well for most joints, epoxy for higher strength. If you want to CA the sheeting and have a good fit between sheets, you might be better off with the thin CA.
Nov 09, 2017, 11:05 AM
B for Bruce
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I use multiple glues as well. CA, aliphatic, epoxy and even balsa cement.

A hint on sanding. CA is bad as mentioned. But it shouldn't be all THAT bad. As a model builder I know that I tended to think that sandpaper lasted forever. But as a wood worker I know it wears out and makes up work harder rather rapidly. Oddly enough I find I can sand CA quite well without leaving a raised line by simply changing out the sandpaper to something fresh a bit more often. That let's me use less pressure to cut the wood and the glue and even the CA joints work out better.

I also tend to fit my joints more tightly and I use the thin CA. That may be part of why I don't get the hard raised lines. It's still just as hard but being thinner the glue lines are more easily cut.
Nov 09, 2017, 12:32 PM
Registered User

Best adhesive


I like to use uhu hart ,dries fast and easy to use.
Nov 10, 2017, 12:39 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by jetmaven
Original formula Titebond , the one with the red label .Also get yourself a Monoject
glue syringe , your LHS should carry them .
Ditto... any "house brand" yellow carpentry glue works well........ the glue syringe is very convenient and likely is also available at the local "crafts" store (eg. Michaels)

Michael in Ontario, Canada
Nov 10, 2017, 01:21 PM
Be an organ donor
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZAGNUT
i use elmer's yellow for just about all wood to wood joints and sometimes a bit of epoxy for areas like joiner boxes. some areas like end grain joints can benefit from being "primed" with thinned down glue before applying the actual glue, can go a long way in preventing a dry joint due to the water being sucked out before the glue can do it's job. especially helpful in joints where you can't get good clamping force.

but there are places where CA is king. a carbon to wood joint where it is impossible to use epoxy is the main one. a currently relevant example would be a carbon tube spar through tight holes in ribs.
Zagnut, what % glue to water are you using when priming the end grain wood?

Keith
Nov 11, 2017, 12:08 AM
I'm All Thumbs
AirBornOne's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by lincoln
BTW, never build with CA if you're barefoot and the floor is a hard, smooth surface. And if you do, don't drop the bottle where you can step on it, especially if you're alone in the house
Tip of the decade!
And if you do have carpeting... you turn into bigfoot ( mystery solved!)
Skies
Jay
Nov 11, 2017, 03:14 PM
Sir Tim Rowledge
rowledge's Avatar
... and never get CA on your finger and then scratch an eye or your genitalia. At least, be smart enough to not do it again.
Nov 11, 2017, 05:20 PM
Registered User
Did you ever try to nip off the tiny blockage at the end of a c.a. applicator and get a drop of it on your front tooth ? It takes to bone like a duck to water . It will eventually wear away .
Nov 12, 2017, 04:33 AM
supreme being of leisure
ZAGNUT's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwmtrubrit
Zagnut, what % glue to water are you using when priming the end grain wood?

Keith
i just eyeball it 1:1....soak the end grain and let it get get semi-dry and then glue.


the solids will settle out over time so either you remember to give the bottle a shake every day or just mix a small batch when needed. at least that's the case with elmers, titebond might be different but i doubt it.


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