Building board? - RC Groups
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Nov 08, 2017, 12:15 PM
Registered User
Discussion

Building board?


Hi all-
I'm setting up a new building room and I want to install a hefty, flat building board.

I was using an 18 x ~24in piece of melamine shelving topped with the 1/2 fiber board (held pins pretty well) that HomeDepot sells (called Homosote in some areas I think).

Wasn't truly flat as I found out and I had screwed the Homosote on top pf the melamine which didn't work all that well as the fiberboard is subject to humidity and gets a bit wavy over time.

So, I was at HomeDepot the other day and the hollow core doors 24" x 6 or 7' looked pretty good and are very light. How flat they actually are is my question. Also, I was think maybe spray adhesive as an alternative to screws with some type of clear sealant on top to mitigate the humidity issue?

Ant thoughts on this before I begin?

Thanks,
Mark
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Nov 08, 2017, 02:54 PM
Registered User
StayQuiet's Avatar
Personally, I wouldn't glue the fiberboard to your base. Eventually, it's going to have to be replaced, as it will get cuts, gouges, and gobs of glue stuck to it over time.

I have a limited area to build (in fact, it's a double wide closet). I went to Lowe's and bought a 3 drawer Kobalt workbench. On that is a piece of 3/4" thick A-A plywood (the type used in cabinet making) cut to 2' X 4'. I glued and nailed some pine board around the edge, sitting about 1/2" above the top of the board. Then I bought a three pack of ceiling tiles. One tile fits inside the base (unfinished side up, of course) and holds pins very well. When it gets worn out, I just replace it.
Nov 08, 2017, 05:07 PM
Registered User
Ceiling tiles are an interesting idea. Are they subject to humidity? I live near the ocean, hence the question.
Nov 08, 2017, 05:17 PM
Registered User
StayQuiet's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newtie
Ceiling tiles are an interesting idea. Are they subject to humidity? I live near the ocean, hence the question.
Anything will eventually be affected by humidity, but unless your build takes a really long time, you should be fine. That's the beauty about being able to replace the work surface easily.

I wouldn't think ceiling tiles would be any more affected by humidity than Homasote.
Nov 08, 2017, 07:27 PM
Hope to get out of life alive
kenh3497's Avatar
I tried ceiling tiles and was not impressed how they held pins. Not as tight as I hoped. Some are using sheetrock/drywall with good success. I've never used it myself.

ken
Nov 08, 2017, 08:21 PM
Registered User
DGrant's Avatar
You'd do fine with ceiling tiles(homosote or very similar..)) in your area. They're a great semi-base to build wings and frames on... I say semi-base, because they need to be set on a perfectly flat(or as close as can be) base table. Most Home Depot or Lowes have tiles in stock... some stores you can get single sheets(24"x48").. and some you'd have to buy a case of 10 sheets(I think it's 10).. which a case is about $40 if memory serves. These sheets can be cut down a bit to fit your space and table... they can be easily used several times, but I've thrown a few away, just because a fresh sheet is very nice... and it depends on the size also. and how it was used.... again they cut down easily with a utitlity knife.. they are fibrous, easy to work with.

I find angling T-pins very efficient, as I don't like putting pins through wood in any case... so yeah.. it won't grip pins if you like to drive them straight down.. but the tile does offer a stable anchor for angled pins of all sizes.

It seems to take tape of all sorts well... Scotch, masking, packing, .. just for securing plans and the like...

So yeah.. this is my experience with the stuff.. I still have about 8 sheets out of 10 I bought years ago.. and I've built many planes in those years. Good luck and enjoy!!
Nov 08, 2017, 08:25 PM
B for Bruce
BMatthews's Avatar
I've always used ceiling tiles myself. For the medium T pins (Dubro's idea of "medium") the tiles work OK. At least if the part sits flat then the pins hold it flat. Or I suppose it's what I'm used to since I've used nothing BUT ceiling tiles since I was a kid.

A few years back I made up some torsion box building boards using a set of hollow folding doors. When I checked them before a recent build they were still as flat as I could see with a long straight edge laid along them and then diagonally corner to corner. And that's good enough for me.

After many models I know the ceiling tiles will show their age. But I'm OK with either making all new boards from a new set of doors or slicing off and scrape clean the old ones so I can spray contact cement on some new tiles.
Nov 08, 2017, 08:28 PM
Registered User
I ended up using a large sheet of fairly thick glass (about 1/4" thick, 20" x 40") covered in cork. The cork is attached to the glass using double sided tape and I have had to replace it once. It works fairly well and I have built quite a few models on it; the largest being a 80" Citabria Pro. The only think that I cannot do on it sheet a foam core wing; the amount of weight needed to hold the sheeting down would bend the glass slightly. The glass rests on my regular work bench but it is raised off the surface by felt pads. I did adjust the pads so that the glass sits flat on the workbench.

Good luck,

Teo
Nov 09, 2017, 10:51 AM
The Junk Man
Once you go with a magnetic building board, you will never go back to pins... ever.

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...5&postcount=11

Here are a couple of tools I designed and made available on Thingiverse.

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2540801

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2540725

Tom
Nov 09, 2017, 12:06 PM
Registered User
Hi Tom-
Pretty amazing board build. No question about flatness here. Also deals with the humidity factor living close to the ocean.

Anyway, I've been a pin man for most of my life so building with magnets is a foreign language to me. How do you actually build with magnets?
Nov 09, 2017, 01:21 PM
The Junk Man
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newtie
Hi Tom-
Pretty amazing board build. No question about flatness here. Also deals with the humidity factor living close to the ocean.

Anyway, I've been a pin man for most of my life so building with magnets is a foreign language to me. How do you actually build with magnets?
Easy. And the magnets are self squaring.

Here are some tools and construction shots from an old build. Not a pin in sight.

Tom
Nov 09, 2017, 02:24 PM
Registered User
OK, I'm in.

I'm close to a Lowes and they have both the door and galvanized panels. I'll pick up some spray adhesive while I'm there as well.

Where can I get a good selection of magnets? Amazon seems to only have round Neodym magnets which according to your pics, right angles are required. I'll do some more poking around on the net and see what turns up.
Nov 09, 2017, 02:37 PM
B for Bruce
BMatthews's Avatar
Not everyone sells on Amazon it seems. I did a quick search for "lee valley magnets" because I know that they carry a good assortment. But a couple of other companies came up as well. Just do a general search on "magnets" or "magnets supplier" and you'll get a good assortment.

I'm keen on putting a steel sheet backing on one of my longer boards for doing fuselages in particular with magnets and magnetic alignment rigging such as Tom shows above. I'm not sure if I'll totally abandon pins but I'd like to play with some magnetic moments to try it out....
Nov 09, 2017, 02:41 PM
B for Bruce
BMatthews's Avatar
Oh, for some small round positionable magnets check out the local dollar store. I know they have small fairly thin round magnets at around 15/$1. They wouldn't be good for anything needing heavy clamping power but they would be fine for holding light stuff in place. And it frees up something stronger for where it's needed.
Nov 09, 2017, 04:36 PM
The Junk Man
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newtie
OK, I'm in.

I'm close to a Lowes and they have both the door and galvanized panels. I'll pick up some spray adhesive while I'm there as well.

Where can I get a good selection of magnets? Amazon seems to only have round Neodym magnets which according to your pics, right angles are required. I'll do some more poking around on the net and see what turns up.
The magnets I used in those 3D printed magnetic board fixtures are from All Electronics. https://www.allelectronics.com/item/...-magnet/1.html

3 for a dollar. Can't beat the price and they fit those fixtures I uploaded perfectly.

These rectangular magnets are very useful. https://supermagnetman.com/collectio...nt=29741110275
Handy for just about everything from stick and tissue stuff on up. 6 bucks for 20 and 40 will probably be all you need forever mixed with a bunch of the cabinet magnets.

Even Harbor Freight has ceramic magnets. On sale they are really cheap. Cheap eve when not on sale actually.

Avoid round magnets for building board use. I use them for hatches and cowls, but I found round has no practical purpose on a building board.

Tom


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