Gearbest - Creality CR-10 3D Printer Review - Page 2 - RC Groups
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Nov 03, 2017, 03:58 PM
Forever WTTM Pilot #7
Buzz's Avatar
Gearbest is taking a beating in their thread. People send them money, then never get what they ordered. Their shipping and stock availability is apparently advertised, but not available.
I don't think I'll order from them either, don. Just look at this mess.

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Nov 03, 2017, 04:29 PM
Newbie w/ Ecks frame + KK2.0
FlyMyX's Avatar
I've been doing what checking I can from the US, asking Shenzhen folks to see what they can learn about Creality. In particular, SexyCyborg just posted a great walk-through video that shows Creality is clearly not a bottom-feeding company.

At this point, everything I've learned indicates Creality is overwhelmed by demand, greatly exceeding the capacity of their in-house production lines. To cope with demand, Creality is using more subcontractors to build components and subsystems they used to build in-house, some of whom are giving them problems.

This situation is also known as "The Curse of Success." From what I can tell, 100% of final assembly and packaging is still done in-house, so this would seem to be a final QA/QC issue, something Creality can't/won't contract out.

Will they fix this situation in time to save their good name and the company itself? Everything indicates they are doing their best, though it remains to be seen if it will be good enough, soon enough.
Nov 03, 2017, 04:31 PM
Registered User
JurassicJet's Avatar
You guys want one heck of a nice, moderate priced printer without the headaches?

Get a Prusa i3 Mk2 or a mk3. $700. No screwing around with craptastick chinese companies. Ordered my Prusa and had it in my hands 5 days later.

Mine has mesh bed leveling, PEI bed surface, sd card with lcd, and custom Prusa Slicr. The new mk3 has even more goodies including a magnetic flexable PEI powder coated bed, optical filament sensor, etc etc

Also, if you are serious about CAD, get Fusion 360 or Solidworks student. Tinkercad is for toys.

https://shop.prusa3d.com/en/3d-print...3-mk3-kit.html
Nov 03, 2017, 04:58 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by don olsen
Sorry guys I have found Gear best and Bangood the least responsible of places to deal with. Always getting the wrong product or not getting it at all. supposed to get money back, just got a credit they wont accept
Wont buy anything more no matter the price
If you’d like a local company, try tinymachines 3d. https://tiny-machines-3d.myshopify.com

They sell (tested) cr-10 machines and accessories. There are likely similar resellers in the UK and elsewhere.
Nov 03, 2017, 05:34 PM
Forever WTTM Pilot #7
Buzz's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zapf
If you’d like a local company, try tinymachines 3d. https://tiny-machines-3d.myshopify.com

They sell (tested) cr-10 machines and accessories. There are likely similar resellers in the UK and elsewhere.
That's good information. Thank you!
Buzz
Nov 03, 2017, 06:13 PM
Registered User
Smurf67's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by don olsen
Sorry guys I have found Gear best and Bangood the least responsible of places to deal with. Always getting the wrong product or not getting it at all. supposed to get money back, just got a credit they wont accept
Wont buy anything more no matter the price
I have about 300 orders from Banggood the last 2,5 years With very little problems.
The very few times there has been something, as wrong deliverys, transport damages etc. they always resendt or refunded me.
So i am thinking you exaggerate...
Nov 03, 2017, 06:46 PM
I hate spray cans
don olsen's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smurf67
I have about 300 orders from Banggood the last 2,5 years With very little problems.
The very few times there has been something, as wrong deliverys, transport damages etc. they always resendt or refunded me.
So i am thinking you exaggerate...
I don't want to get into a long discussion about these folks. My experience is vastly different than yours, and there it lies forever
Don
Nov 04, 2017, 09:10 AM
Registered User

CR-1o can print Wood, and TPU


if you do your research, you will find it prints Wood, and also TPU flexible filament!, all you need is the TPU mod, very simple to do even... so no it just does not print only PLA..
Nov 05, 2017, 01:48 PM
Registered User

Tiny Machines 3D


For those wanting another avenue to purchase a Creality CR-10 series printer, I recommend Chris at Tiny Machines 3D
He offers great prices and customer service. He tests every single unit before sending. Located in Houston, TX

I bought a CR-10-S4 which has the 400x400x400 print area. I am very happy with my printer.
Also a great source for parts and filament is Zyltech Engineering also located in the Houston area. Many of their filaments sell for under $15 for a 1KG spool.

If you contact either of these companies, please tell them I sent you.

Jeff
Herzog Racing Products
Nov 06, 2017, 07:30 AM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by TDisaster
Couldn't agree more. However, if recommend stepping up to a slightly higher price bracket on the printer. I've got a Power Spec 3D Pro 2 (microcenter rebranded flashforge creator pro) running simplify 3D. You get a printer that sells for over a grand for around 600$ when they're on sale. I've honestly yet to have a failed print due to anything other than user error (running out of filament, rushing the calibration, other PEBKAC errors ).

I know it's easy to recommend a cheap printer to a newbie, but I don't agree. These open bed printers can't do much outside of PLA, either. It's just not worth saving a few hundred bucks to have a glorified figurine printer. With a good printer and proper setup one can print some really solid parts that both look good and are structurally sane. You really do get what you pay for.

Edit: The 3D pro sells for 500$ normally. Only difference is the 2 has a dual head, which is pretty handy.
Sorry but I couldn't disagree with you more. I've been printing on a reprap P3Steel that I built myself for a few years now. It is an open bed printer though there are many easy DIY enclosure solutions if you desire/need that. Mine so far is not enclosed and it prints "some really solid parts that both look good and are structurally sane." I don't print figurines with it. I print mostly ABS and some PLA. I have not printed flexible filaments but that has more to do with the extruder type which I can print and add myself when and if I feel the need. Based on my own research, If I was in the market for a new printer today, I would buy a CR-10 mostly for its larger build volume but also because the youtube reviews I've watched show it capable of some very nice and also large prints at a very reasonable price. The hastle of dealing with the "War Department" is the only reason I haven't already ordered one.
Nov 06, 2017, 10:01 AM
Registered User
TDisaster's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by 120pilot
Sorry but I couldn't disagree with you more. I've been printing on a reprap P3Steel that I built myself for a few years now. It is an open bed printer though there are many easy DIY enclosure solutions if you desire/need that. Mine so far is not enclosed and it prints "some really solid parts that both look good and are structurally sane." I don't print figurines with it. I print mostly ABS and some PLA. I have not printed flexible filaments but that has more to do with the extruder type which I can print and add myself when and if I feel the need. Based on my own research, If I was in the market for a new printer today, I would buy a CR-10 mostly for its larger build volume but also because the youtube reviews I've watched show it capable of some very nice and also large prints at a very reasonable price. The hastle of dealing with the "War Department" is the only reason I haven't already ordered one.
I'd really like to see some photos of ABS prints with overhangs and thin features.

It's certainly not impossible to get the cheaper open bed printers to do the job, but unless you're buying a printer as a hobby in itself, it doesn't make much sense to me to buy something that's rather limited just to save money.

Different strokes for different folks. Everyone has their own desires in machine. For what I use a printer for I need a machine that I can count on turning out quality prints quickly without spending time playing with settings. I've had a DaVinci 1.0 and a Prusia i3. Both used Slic3r, and both struggled with consistency and quality. If I tinkered with setups, I could get some decent parts, but it wasn't worth the time. With Simplify3D and the Powerspec I haven't had a failed print that wasn't due to human error, for what I believe to be an extremely reasonable price.
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Nov 06, 2017, 11:09 AM
Registered User
JurassicJet's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by TDisaster
I'd really like to see some photos of ABS prints with overhangs and thin features.

It's certainly not impossible to get the cheaper open bed printers to do the job, but unless you're buying a printer as a hobby in itself, it doesn't make much sense to me to buy something that's rather limited just to save money.

Different strokes for different folks. Everyone has their own desires in machine. For what I use a printer for I need a machine that I can count on turning out quality prints quickly without spending time playing with settings. I've had a DaVinci 1.0 and a Prusia i3. Both used Slic3r, and both struggled with consistency and quality. If I tinkered with setups, I could get some decent parts, but it wasn't worth the time. With Simplify3D and the Powerspec I haven't had a failed print that wasn't due to human error, for what I believe to be an extremely reasonable price.

How is the Powerspec different/better than the Prusa? Which Powerspec do you have?
If it is just the enclosure I can make one of them in either my woodworking shop or my metal working shop. Heck I could make it out of bright aluminum diamond plate 😉

I am not being flippint, I am truly curious. If the Simplyfy3D software would be a big help to my Prusa, I may consider it.
Nov 06, 2017, 11:20 AM
Registered User
TDisaster's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by JurassicJet
How is the Powerspec different/better than the Prusa? Which Powerspec do you have?
If it is just the enclosure I can make one of them in either my woodworking shop or my metal working shop. Heck I could make it out of bright aluminum diamond plate ��

I am not being flippint, I am truly curious. If the Simplyfy3D software would be a big help to my Prusa, I may consider it.
I've got the Powerspec 3D Pro 2. It has dual extruder heads, but the biggest thing for me is that the enclosure is aluminum and the chassis is built into the enclosure. It's an extremely rigid machine compared to the previous printers I've had. This helps with consistency, as the machine is solid and has less flex and give when printing at higher speeds. The heated bed is a solid piece of aluminum which is wonderful when it comes to keeping an consistent bed temperature. Even with the large bit of aluminum it has to heat it still gets to operating temp reasonably quickly.

The extruders it came with perform well and I've had no issues there. Overall the electronics seem to be quality. I'm coming up to 1000hrs printing and outside of replacing the build plate material (went with buildtak this time and am very happy) it's required zero maintenance. Belts are still tight as the day I bought it and the rails and bearings are holding up well with no slop.

It's hard to quantify how awesome Simplify3D is. The slicing software is great, haven't had issues with weird layer stuff like I did with Slic3r. The auto support function is great and rafts work well. Where I was having issues with weird defects in prints with Slic3r, Simplify3D has been solid. Give it a Google and read some reviews, I'm sure there are folks out there that can explain why it's awesome software much better than I.
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Nov 06, 2017, 12:01 PM
Registered User
JurassicJet's Avatar
Thank you for your response.

The one nice thing about the prusa i3 is the fact that the heat bed is all one piece. There is a layer of PEI on top of it, but the heating element and the bed are all together so there's no extra glass or metal on top of the actual heating element. The new prusa I3 Mark 3 has a print bed that is flexible metal with Pei powder coated to it, and then that is held down with magnets to the actual heat bed. So once the print is complete you pop the metal off and flex it slightly to pop your print off. It looks like a really neat process.

I am certainly going to look into Simplyfy3D and read some reviews, although I will have to admit that my Prusa has been extremely reliable and very good at printing so far.
Nov 06, 2017, 12:17 PM
Registered User
TDisaster's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by JurassicJet
Thank you for your response.

The one nice thing about the prusa i3 is the fact that the heat bed is all one piece. There is a layer of PEI on top of it, but the heating element and the bed are all together so there's no extra glass or metal on top of the actual heating element. The new prusa I3 Mark 3 has a print bed that is flexible metal with Pei powder coated to it, and then that is held down with magnets to the actual heat bed. So once the print is complete you pop the metal off and flex it slightly to pop your print off. It looks like a really neat process.

I am certainly going to look into Simplyfy3D and read some reviews, although I will have to admit that my Prusa has been extremely reliable and very good at printing so far.
That could work well, but I feel like it may add more headache than it needs to. Since I moved to buildtak I haven't had an issue with prints sticking. I just take a sharpened putty knife and slide in between the build material and the print, as soon as there's a gap the whole print dislodges with no marks or issues.

There's more than one way to do a lot of this. It's all what you prefer or need. I print a lot of prototypes for a side job as well as parts for older amps and audio equipment. So, getting good prints the first time was important to me, which is why my current setup makes me so happy. It's also why I'd recommend it to someone just starting out. The learning curve can be steep and it's easy to get discouraged with a printer that needs a lot of attention. Once you get the gist of it, it might be fun to tinker, though.
Latest blog entry: Tracker III Repair Thread


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