Self building Goldberg Eaglet 50 electro. - RC Groups
Thread Tools
Oct 20, 2017, 04:00 AM
Registered User
Build Log

Self building Goldberg Eaglet 50 electro.


Self building Goldberg Eaglet 50 electro.
I decided to create this topic. Maybe it will be interesting to someone.
There are changes from the original design. In addition, I make a model without a chassis. Since there, where I run the models, a high grass cover. This is a private area and you can not mow the grass.
 Plans for my Goldberg Eaglet 50 in PDF I'll post a little later. I can also provide Auto Cad. At the moment the model is still under construction.
Thankful to BMatthews. It was with his blessing that I decided to open this topic.

Of course, at first I printed out the drawings and made the part templates. Construction began with the wing.
Templates of ribs were made from plywood 1.5 mm. The ribs themselves are made of balsa 2 mm. The rear edge of the wing and aileron made of separate two racks stacked together. Shelves of spar from light, non-resinous pine 6x6 mm.
Sign up now
to remove ads between posts
Oct 20, 2017, 04:36 AM
Registered User
Electronics on the model here in the photo. Weight 406 grams. Flight weight not more than 900 grams.
Oct 20, 2017, 02:37 PM
B for Bruce
BMatthews's Avatar
Lemia, not too many folks these days know how to correctly use a fretsaw with a proper birdsmouth support. You're really going "old school"

And for those that don't know the wood birdsmouth thingie in the second picture is used as a rest for the part while the other hand uses the fret saw from below to manually do the same thing your powered scroll saw does.

A little more focus on your methods will be a great learning tool for many folks new to building from plans. I look forward to following this thread.
Oct 20, 2017, 05:05 PM
RFD
RFD
AMA 51668
RFD's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by BMatthews
Lemia, not too many folks these days know how to correctly use a fretsaw with a proper birdsmouth support. You're really going "old school" ...
just a minor tool name correction, if yer referring to the bowed saw in lemia's pic. that's a coping or scroll saw and not a fret saw. i use a real fret saw quite often, for what it was intended, cutting fret slots in a fingerboard for a fretted instrument. i do use a scroll saw, too, mostly for inlay purfling cut outs.
Oct 20, 2017, 11:04 PM
B for Bruce
BMatthews's Avatar
RFD, for whatever reason the deeper frames that use the shorter and much finer blades as Lemia is using are called fret saws. Don't ask me why because as you posted they have nothing to do with cutting the slots for stringed instrument frets.... which luthiers also call fret saws.... more confusion Don't blame me, I'm just the messenger . On the other hand coping saws use longer (8"?) blades and generally have a less deep frame.

Doing a google image search on "fret saws" will also turn up a heap of images of this same small skinny blade deep frame style of saw. While the same search for "coping saw" turns up images of what we all expect. And oddly enough, or perhaps not so oddly, a search for "scroll saw" gives back nothing but powered saws as we expect.

I do agree that in a world that made sense that since this "fret saw" uses a blade that is the same or at least similar to a powered scroll saw that it SHOULD make sense to call the manual version a scroll saw as well. But for some odd reason it isn't.

Here's what I mean in just one example.

Fret saw

Coping saw
Oct 21, 2017, 12:55 AM
Registered User
Were you surprised by my jig saw? Very user-friendly.
Before the cut of the ribs, I marked out on the plan their position, with small balsa waste. Cut with a knife. Folded in a package. And separately processed for the left and right part of the wing.
Oct 21, 2017, 01:11 AM
fix-n-fly
Hi Lemia - you are tempting me to shove the stuff I have on my building board to the side and build my Eaglet 50 kit. I built one about 10 years ago and a rash thought of trying an outside loop during a flight did it in. Good luck in your build.
Oct 21, 2017, 03:22 PM
Registered User
Hey Lemia, are you going to build the fuselage in balsa or plywood? What you've done so far looks great!

Mike
Oct 21, 2017, 04:30 PM
M0unt@in M0del$ minion
turbojoe's Avatar
My electrified Eaglet 50 was a LONG term project. 10+ years in fact. I didn't take many pictures but I documented some of the project on WattFlyer here: https://www.wattflyer.com/forums/sho...ghlight=Eaglet When I started the conversion the kit was still available so no free plans were online then. I used the kit wood as templates (to make templates) and built it from all balsa except for the firewall and the landing gear mounting. It's light enough now (40oz AUW) that it flies extremely well on a beat up old E-Flight 480 motor. Dump the ply fuse parts and go balsa.

Joe
Oct 21, 2017, 05:16 PM
B for Bruce
BMatthews's Avatar
Lemia, like you I prefer to cut out my ribs in the same manner just slightly oversize. I stack them in the same manner and sand down the block of ribs to the final size and then cut in the spar slots just as you're doing.

On top of that I number the ribs from one end to the other so that any even slight differences are spread out evenly and all the spar notches line up correctly.

I find that a big part of making a wing which does not warp easily is building in a manner that does not introduce a lot of stress in any of the parts. And part of that is evening up the trailing and leading edges and cutting the spar notches as you're going to do in the block so they are in line the whole way along the wing.
Oct 22, 2017, 12:25 AM
Registered User
I am grateful to everyone who participates in this topic.
The side panels of the fuselage are made with balsa 2.5mm, medium density. On the entire fuselage used three sheets of 2.5x100x1000 mm. The photo of the fabrication will be on.
Glue I use Titebond II Premium. At the top of the plan I use lavsan film from the flower shop. To this film does not stick glue. The leading edge of balsa is 6x8 mm and will be rounded. Shelves of spar from light pine 6x6 mm.
Immediately after removal from the pack I numbered the ribs.
The paper tubes for the servo cable are made in one layer.
Oct 22, 2017, 12:59 AM
Registered User
[QUOTE=
I find that a big part of making a wing which does not warp easily is building in a manner that does not introduce a lot of stress in any of the parts. And part of that is evening up the trailing and leading edges and cutting the spar notches as you're going to do in the block so they are in line the whole way along the wing.[/QUOTE]

The ribs are manufactured in several stages.
At first I process in a pack. Then I disassemble and number. In plywood patterns I make cuts under the shelves of the spars. Again I collect in a pack. And I'm making a pattern in the package. Here is the final photo of the plywood templates. From the top and bottom already removed 1.6 mm for the central ribs (covering the center wing). The correct position of the balsa ribs is retained by the three mounting holes. There is no third hole in the photo. In its place is an opening under the paper cable channel clamp.
Oct 24, 2017, 09:35 AM
Registered User
Continuation of the construction of the wing.
Oct 25, 2017, 02:31 AM
B for Bruce
BMatthews's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lemia
The ribs are manufactured in several stages.
At first I process in a pack. Then I disassemble and number. In plywood patterns I make cuts under the shelves of the spars. Again I collect in a pack. And I'm making a pattern in the package. Here is the final photo of the plywood templates. From the top and bottom already removed 1.6 mm for the central ribs (covering the center wing). The correct position of the balsa ribs is retained by the three mounting holes. There is no third hole in the photo. In its place is an opening under the paper cable channel clamp.
That is a copy of what I do. In English we have a phrase "great minds think alike and fools seldom differ".... I hope it comes through in the translation... I will leave it to you to figure out if we are both "great minds" or "fools"... But all kidding aside that's lovely work. I hope you get some group recognition for how nicely you build and the methods you use.

And like you I've found that it only takes a few minutes more to notch the small trailing edges and do do the stacking and numbering. In fact in the end I'm not sure it costs any time at all. A little extra up front before assembly results in a smooth and trouble free assembly of the wings so they go together faster. But more importantly they go together so easily and well that it makes me smile. And that is the whole point of building our own.
Oct 25, 2017, 08:38 AM
the smell of nitro in the morn
Very clean work and looks great. Great flying plane also.


Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Category Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Build Log Carl Goldberg Eaglet 50 J Bergsmith Balsa Builders 87 Oct 12, 2017 01:48 PM
Build Log Goldberg Eaglet 50 build latebraker Fuel Plane Talk 73 Mar 15, 2017 09:34 AM
Discussion Back to basics Goldberg Eaglet 50 Trainer kit build Thunderboat42 Beginner Training Area (Fuel) 20 May 02, 2015 12:37 AM
Discussion Goldberg Eaglet 50 electric turbojoe Glow to Electric Conversions 15 Jan 16, 2012 08:07 PM