Rib build QnA (I ask, you answer! :D ) - Page 3 - RC Groups
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Oct 06, 2017, 03:18 AM
IMO ( In My Opinion ) →
balsa or carbon's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Extreme Sports
Once you are ready for a flying wing, you will need to reprogramme the Tx for elevons. To do that you will need the USB cable sold by HK (it is not just any old USB cable, so you need to get the right one). But until then, B&C is spot on - the radio should work fine out of the box, and you will just need to make sure that the servos etc are mounted and connected to move the flight surfaces in the right direction. Back when many folks on this forum learned to fly, there were no programmable radios, so this was the only way to set up a plane. So I guess B&C will be taking you on a short history tour as well
In my opinion , it will be simpler and possibly even less expensive to get a $3 v-tail mixer for elevon mixing .
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Oct 06, 2017, 06:37 AM
Registered User
Extreme Sports's Avatar
The cable costs about the same (https://hobbyking.com/en_us/hobby-ki...usb-cable.html), but gives you remarkable programming flexibility for such a cheap radio - servo reversing, setting up a throttle cut switch and tailoring the dual rates, programming mixes etc. Also, mine came without Ch5&6 linked to anything, so I needed the cable to set those up. I'd say that was far more value than just buying a V-tail mixer for much the same price.

Remember, this lad has BIG ambitions and GRAND plans.... Plus he's from the generation that finds tinkering with this stuff intuitive!
Oct 06, 2017, 11:24 AM
IMO ( In My Opinion ) →
balsa or carbon's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Extreme Sports
The cable costs about the same (https://hobbyking.com/en_us/hobby-ki...usb-cable.html), but gives you remarkable programming flexibility for such a cheap radio - servo reversing, setting up a throttle cut switch and tailoring the dual rates, programming mixes etc. Also, mine came without Ch5&6 linked to anything, so I needed the cable to set those up. I'd say that was far more value than just buying a V-tail mixer for much the same price.

Remember, this lad has BIG ambitions and GRAND plans.... Plus he's from the generation that finds tinkering with this stuff intuitive!
If he stays in the hobby and has multiple planes in the future , no doubt he'll get a computer radio with multiple model memory . For me , it's not worth it to try to program the cheap HobbyKing radio .... it's best used as is for just one plane .
Oct 06, 2017, 01:49 PM
IMO ( In My Opinion ) →
balsa or carbon's Avatar
So how's the progress on the EzFly airframe ?
Have you installed AA batteries in the transmitter yet ?

Here's how you connect everything ( photo below ) ↓

The plugs ( from the ESC and servos ) going into the receiver should be plugged in with the darkest wire ( black or brown ground wire " - " ) on the outside , and the lightest wire ( white or yellow signal wire ) on the inside . The red wire in the middle is the positive " + " wire that supplies 6v power ( from the BEC inside the ESC ) to the receiver and servos . The receiver and servos should never be powered by more than 6 volts .

To test the radio , receiver , motor ( WITHOUT a prop ) and servos ....
1 . make sure the throttle stick ( AND the throttle trim tab next to it ) are all the way down
2 . turn on the transmitter
3 . plug the fully charged lipo battery into the ESC
4 . look for the light on the receiver to come on , and wait for the beeps to end
5 . test the motor and servos
6 . unplug the lipo battery from the ESC
7 . turn off the transmitter
Oct 06, 2017, 04:33 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by balsa or carbon
So how's the progress on the EzFly airframe ?
Have you installed AA batteries in the transmitter yet ?

Here's how you connect everything ( photo below ) ↓

The plugs ( from the ESC and servos ) going into the receiver should be plugged in with the darkest wire ( black or brown ground wire " - " ) on the outside , and the lightest wire ( white or yellow signal wire ) on the inside . The red wire in the middle is the positive " + " wire that supplies 6v power ( from the BEC inside the ESC ) to the receiver and servos . The receiver and servos should never be powered by more than 6 volts .

To test the radio , receiver , motor ( WITHOUT a prop ) and servos ....
1 . make sure the throttle stick ( AND the throttle trim tab next to it ) are all the way down
2 . turn on the transmitter
3 . plug the fully charged lipo battery into the ESC
4 . look for the light on the receiver to come on , and wait for the beeps to end
5 . test the motor and servos
6 . unplug the lipo battery from the ESC
7 . turn off the transmitter
Thank you! I was about to come on and ask about that.

Progress is a bit slow, but IT ALL FITS! So happy about that!

I can't remember where I placed my new razor blades I purchased for a different project for Green Aquatics (my biz, and the project was taking apart an aquarium that I couldn't use anymore), so I've resorted to using an old exacto-knife with a steak knife to cut through the second piece of paper on the other side of the foam. I use small downward motions to cut the foam [pretty much an inchworm's pace if he crawled in millimeter increments..], then trace those lines with the steak knife to fillet it from the other piece of foam and paper backing.

I'm also hoping this doesn't have to be perfect, as there are several minor imperfections. I doubt it'll be an issue with a trainer, though I look forward to finishing this before I head off to bed if I can [still have to work 4 hours around the house today if I want to spend all day flying this tomorrow]. Thank you for all your advice and help [all of you]
Oct 06, 2017, 04:58 PM
treefinder
springer's Avatar
flyinwingfanatic:
You have two good guys walking you through all this so I won't get into the "training" discussion, but I will suggest another site that will stand you in good stead for RC gear in the future: banggood.com I have found that they have many of the same products that Hobbyking carries, have a more easily navigated website, a better handling of purchases from multiple warehouses, and most of the items are free shipping.

Also, I am a bit late to the discussion since you already have a transmitter, but I recently bought this one on a lark https://www.banggood.com/FlySky-FS-i...l?rmmds=search (Banggood had their 11th anniversary sale a few weeks ago, and this was on sale for $36 with the receiver so I figured why not?). I flew one of my foamies with it yesterday, and the radio is a well made unit, has a quick and solid bind, good range so far ( over 1000ft) and is programmable on the tx (no cables needed for programming, though they have one available to connect to PC and do firmware upgrades ) Plus it has built-in telemetry, and guys have already opened the firmware to upgrades to 10 channels plus other neat tricks - all for future thought after you learn to fly your trainer. It will be the one I recommend for noobs from now on.

Also, going back to your original question (and I agree with the guys that you should go through the trainer/learn the build, learn the sticks, etc before seriously working on your wing ideas.) a lot of which build technique you use will depend on how big you want to build. I have built a few wings, and most have been KFM airfoils. They fly well, and I would recommend that airfoil as a quick, easy build one to learn how to fly a wing ( the bank and yank technique as BOC mentioned). There are many wings of this type on the scratch built foamies forum. On the other hand, as future food for thought, the build techniques I used in the 7foot wingspan wing may be of interest to you. I used Model Plane Foam for ribs and skin, made spars from 1/4" square wood stock with webs of tablet back type cardboard and it came out as a very nice flying plane. The elevons are powered by two 9 gram servos, which shows how powerful those little guys are. https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...g-MPF-and-wood

Welcome to foamies and enjoy the ride! Remember: it's only foam, so when you crash, it is easy and quick to repair and get back in the air, and easy to build another plane when your first one gets too much glue on it to fly well!
Oct 06, 2017, 05:09 PM
treefinder
springer's Avatar
tips on cutting Readiboard: if you have an xacto, see if you can find a pocket sharpening stone and give the blade a few strokes on the stone every few cuts. I find that a blade will last years and be sharp enough to cut through foam and paper. Also, use a three stroke cut: first cut through the first layer of paper using just the sharp tip of the blade, don't even try to cut into the foam. Then go back over the cut line and cut through the foam. finally cut through the second layer of paper. Also, hold the knife at a low angle to the cut, not vertical to it, that makes cutting lots easier. As you get farther into it, you may want to remove the paper from the foam and you will find that the three stroke cut goes really fast and gives great smooth clean edges.
Oct 06, 2017, 06:00 PM
IMO ( In My Opinion ) →
balsa or carbon's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyinWingFanatic
Thank you! I was about to come on and ask about that.

Progress is a bit slow, but IT ALL FITS! So happy about that!


I'm also hoping this doesn't have to be perfect, as there are several minor imperfections. I doubt it'll be an issue with a trainer
I consider all my Dollar Tree foam board plane airframes to be disposable , if they are crashed beyond repair .... it only costs a dollar or two to make another airframe . The electronics almost always survive the crashes .... and can then be transferred to a new airframe .

The most important part in the assembly of the airframe ..... is that the horizontal pieces ( wing , h-stab ) are straight , square and true when they fit into the vertical pieces . It's always best to do a dry fit to check for proper alignment , etc. ..... before glueing things in place .




Here is the most "disposable" airframe I've made so far ( took about 15 minutes ) , literally a flying sheet of Dollar Tree foam board . It doesn't protect the electronics very well though , so I don't recommend it for a trainer :


"Literally" just a Flying Sheet of Dollar Tree Foam Board (1 min 13 sec)
Oct 06, 2017, 06:26 PM
IMO ( In My Opinion ) →
balsa or carbon's Avatar
Just a few words of advice for setting up your EzFly :

The prop attaches to the motor's prop saver with the two rubber bands , small one first ... then the bigger one . The front of the prop HAS TO face the front of the plane ..... the front of the prop is curved out , and usually has letters/numbers on it . If the motor turns in the wrong direction , just switch any two ( of the three ) wires going to it from the ESC .

Install the servos with the correct servo arm travel direction , check that BEFORE installing the servos . Move the right TX stick to the right , and the rudder should move to the right ( as viewed from behind the plane ) . PULL the right TX stick back , and the elevator should go up . PUSH the right TX stick forward , and the elevator should go down .

Connect the control surface pushrods to the INNER hole on the servo arms , and the OUTER hole on the control horns .

Fly your first flights over a huge , open , grass covered field ... at a time when there's NO wind . Start with the rudder and elevator centered , then adjust as necessary for straight and level flight at about half throttle .
Oct 06, 2017, 06:37 PM
Registered User
Bringamosa's Avatar
Looking forward to the maiden flight
Oct 06, 2017, 07:35 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by springer
flyinwingfanatic:
You have two good guys walking you through all this so I won't get into the "training" discussion, but I will suggest another site that will stand you in good stead for RC gear in the future: banggood.com I have found that they have many of the same products that Hobbyking carries, have a more easily navigated website, a better handling of purchases from multiple warehouses, and most of the items are free shipping.

Also, I am a bit late to the discussion since you already have a transmitter, but I recently bought this one on a lark https://www.banggood.com/FlySky-FS-i...l?rmmds=search (Banggood had their 11th anniversary sale a few weeks ago, and this was on sale for $36 with the receiver so I figured why not?). I flew one of my foamies with it yesterday, and the radio is a well made unit, has a quick and solid bind, good range so far ( over 1000ft) and is programmable on the tx (no cables needed for programming, though they have one available to connect to PC and do firmware upgrades ) Plus it has built-in telemetry, and guys have already opened the firmware to upgrades to 10 channels plus other neat tricks - all for future thought after you learn to fly your trainer. It will be the one I recommend for noobs from now on.

Also, going back to your original question (and I agree with the guys that you should go through the trainer/learn the build, learn the sticks, etc before seriously working on your wing ideas.) a lot of which build technique you use will depend on how big you want to build. I have built a few wings, and most have been KFM airfoils. They fly well, and I would recommend that airfoil as a quick, easy build one to learn how to fly a wing ( the bank and yank technique as BOC mentioned). There are many wings of this type on the scratch built foamies forum. On the other hand, as future food for thought, the build techniques I used in the 7foot wingspan wing may be of interest to you. I used Model Plane Foam for ribs and skin, made spars from 1/4" square wood stock with webs of tablet back type cardboard and it came out as a very nice flying plane. The elevons are powered by two 9 gram servos, which shows how powerful those little guys are. https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...g-MPF-and-wood

Welcome to foamies and enjoy the ride! Remember: it's only foam, so when you crash, it is easy and quick to repair and get back in the air, and easy to build another plane when your first one gets too much glue on it to fly well!
Thanks for the link and advice! I'll consider getting that one for my [hmm, what should I call it?] "second" / "final" / "next" Tx(?) Lol. While I'm not fond of using the one I got for a single plane, it will make introducing someone else to this hobby that much easier. I'm currently thinking my 5 yo nephew, then the three year old in a couple years, and then the one to be born any day once he's old enough (about 5 yo I guess) [btw, what is a good age to start kids with flying if they're interested?]. Might let some friends fly it sometime, but I really would like to keep this one in the family if I can, though we'll see how things go. I definitely don't need a plane cluttering my things unless it's flown somewhat regularly.
Quote:
Originally Posted by balsa or carbon
I consider all my Dollar Tree foam board plane airframes to be disposable , if they are crashed beyond repair .... it only costs a dollar or two to make another airframe . The electronics almost always survive the crashes .... and can then be transferred to a new airframe .

The most important part in the assembly of the airframe ..... is that the horizontal pieces ( wing , h-stab ) are straight , square and true when they fit into the vertical pieces . It's always best to do a dry fit to check for proper alignment , etc. ..... before glueing things in place .




Here is the most "disposable" airframe I've made so far ( took about 15 minutes ) , literally a flying sheet of Dollar Tree foam board . It doesn't protect the electronics very well though , so I don't recommend it for a trainer :


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRVJTHLlUB4
Haha, epicness in that video. It's amazing what you can get to fly.

Those slots where the wing fits in is the reason I started over on one of my attempts (the first attempt, after I cut the fuselage) of cutting the nose doubler. Started cutting too far in, started from the other end but ended up doing the same thing instead of correcting it. Good thing I had enough extra room on the sheet to try again! [see attachment]




Only thing I've got left to do is glue pieces together (dry fitting horizontal ones first), component testing and putting together / installing, figuring out the wing spar from my old unusable arrow that came with the bow I got [that's the next hobby I'm going to get back into, and soon], and setting a time tomorrow to FLYYYYYY!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bringamosa
Looking forward to the maiden flight
I am too! I hope I don't crash too badly. I guess we'll see.




On the attachments: all of the build, etc will be laid out at the end of the video (after the maiden flight) in the new thread I'll be creating. Just want to give you guys enough to whet your appetite for that video when it comes out.
Oct 06, 2017, 07:42 PM
IMO ( In My Opinion ) →
balsa or carbon's Avatar
All the pieces look good in photo #3 ..... don't forget to put the polyhedral angles on the wing ends , VERY important for giving the EzFly it's self-righting stability .
Oct 06, 2017, 09:06 PM
Registered User
Applying the glue using the 'brush' method worked fairly well, but it's actually quite difficult to do unless you're able to brush it on little by little across the build [instead of brushing a single large piece of foam like I tried]. The result was a few gaps and probably not the best seal, but I don't think a few small gaps will be detrimental, will it? Would you guys recommend going back with a glue gun to fill in as many holes as I can?


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