OD-17 O.F.F.C. One Design Model For 2017 - RC Groups
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Jul 07, 2017, 11:45 PM
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Build Log

OD-17 O.F.F.C. One Design Model For 2017


This year, I am the CD for the O.F.F.C. One Design contest in October. It's usually some very simple model, either an old classic from the 30s or 40s or something the CD dreams up himself.

Some of the members (a few in their 90s) complained that they were beginning to have difficulty building frames with 1/16" square stock. Since I manufacture my own kits and have a laser cutter I decided to design a model with sheet sides, a heavier wing structure, with laminated formers and tail group outlines that could be built more easily, by someone loosing the feeling in their fingertips, while still being a good flier. My intent was to kit some up for the members who wanted to enter. I announced it and showed the prototype at the meeting last Wednesday and, so far, I'm producing a dozen. This model, the OD-17 (One Design 2017) should be an easy and satisfying project for a beginner. I'll be sending a few to selected modelers to get feedback as to whether or not I should make it into a regular production kit.

The photo is the first prototype stuck together for a "bones shot". I discovered what I consider weak spots in the fuselage that require care in building so it has been redesigned slightly but the final version is essentially what you see in the photo.
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Jul 08, 2017, 05:32 PM
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i'm not an expert and somehow newcomer to rubber free flight , but always build my own designs and always try to make them as simple as possible ...... so as a builder think it is quite easy to build with good shape and outlines and think should be a good flyer too
Jul 08, 2017, 05:53 PM
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MKellyvich's Avatar
That looks like a very good first fuselage model - just the thing for my 7-year-old to build after the Guillows profile jobs he's started with. Please update the thread with your progress and decision on producing it as a kit.

Mike
Jul 12, 2017, 01:27 AM
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A couple of views with the skin on. Flies fine outdoors, but the contest is indoors. I'll see how it flies indoors at the O.F.F.C meeting tomorrow.
Jul 12, 2017, 06:17 PM
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The flying session was cut short today so I didn't get it trimmed or do a video. I'll try to get a video at the Luther session on Friday.
Jul 13, 2017, 01:50 AM
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i am waiting to see
Jul 24, 2017, 07:28 PM
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Every summer, when my grandson goes to science camp at the California Science Center, I sit in the food court of the Science Center and build model airplanes while I'm waiting for his class to end. This year I build the definitive version of the OD-17 on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday and started on the production version of my Irish Jumping Bean, Bo0stonian, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. I get about two hours of working time each day. Since I also become something of a museum exhibit I am also answering the question of passers by.

The redesign of the OD-17 is subtle (Compare the "bones shot" photos.) but it is now even easier to build and what I consider some weak spots have been eliminated. I don't know how much time I will get to test it at the O.F.F.C. meeting on Wednesday, since there is a contest, but I will attempt a video.

Some of the comments that people make when seeing someone building a stick and tissue model are interesting:

The best millennial comment was, "Doing something like that is like Chitty Chitty Bang Bang old!"

One teenage girl asked me how long it would take me to build the model I was working on (Irish Jumping Bean). I told her about 10 hours. She turned to her friends and said, "OMG, ten hours for just one of those? I can't imagine working on anything like that for 10 hours."

The best one was the 8 or 9 year old kid watching me pin down the plans. "What's that?" he said pointing. The kid had never seen a thumb tack!
Last edited by kittyfritters; Aug 25, 2017 at 03:54 PM.
Jul 25, 2017, 01:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kittyfritters
Every summer, when my grandson goes to science camp at the California Science Center, I sit in the food court of the Science Center and build model airplanes while I'm waiting for his class to end. This year I build the definitive version of the OD-17 on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday and started on the production version of my Irish Jumping Bean, Bo0stonian, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. I get about two hours of working time each day. Since I also become something of a museum exhibit I am also answering the question of passers by.

The redesign of the OD-17 is subtle (Compare the "bones shot" photos.) but it is now even easier to build and what I consider some weak spots have been eliminated. I don't know how much time I will get to test it at the O.F.F.C. meeting on Wednesday, since there is a contest, but I will attempt a video.

Some of the comments that people make when seeing someone building a stick and tissue model are interesting:

The best millennial comment was, "Doing something like that is like Chitty Chitty Bang Band old!"

One teenage girl asked me how long it would take me to build the model I was working on (Irish Jumping Bean). I told her about 10 hours. She turned to her friends and said, "OMG, ten hours for just one of those? I can't imagine working on anything like that for 10 hours."

The best one was the 8 or 9 year old kid watching me pin down the plans. "What's that?" he said pointing. The kid had never seen a thumb tack!
you make the sides of the fuselage like many rc trainers that i'v seen ..... it really saves a lot of time and makes things much easier if one use laser cut ..... but is it as strong as conventional fuselages ..... i was thinking about using this method on larger models ...... what about the wait ? isn't it much heavier ?
Jul 25, 2017, 04:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flymam
you make the sides of the fuselage like many rc trainers that i'v seen ..... it really saves a lot of time and makes things much easier if one use laser cut ..... but is it as strong as conventional fuselages ..... i was thinking about using this method on larger models ...... what about the wait ? isn't it much heavier ?
The model has a 19 inch wing span, 55 square inches of wing area, and weighs 21.5 grams with a loop of 1/8" flat rubber, 1-1/2 times the hook to peg length. It is certainly not as delicate to handle as a Bostonian or Embryo made of 1/16" square stock and is much easier and quicker to build.

There are changes that I made to eliminate what I considered weak points in the original prototype. (Compare "bones shot" photos.) The area behind the nose former is deeper, there is a top and bottom panel in the nose to box it in. The nose block key is deeper, the cockpit side window and the hole under it has been reshaped, there is another cross piece at the bottom of the fuselage in the area under the wing and the last lightening hole in the fuselage side, under the elevator, has been eliminated. I have also changed from a 6" Peck prop (150 mm, Pecks are actually metric.) to the one gram heavier 6" EB prop to get it to balance with out ballast.
Jul 26, 2017, 02:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kittyfritters
The model has a 19 inch wing span, 55 square inches of wing area, and weighs 21.5 grams with a loop of 1/8" flat rubber, 1-1/2 times the hook to peg length. It is certainly not as delicate to handle as a Bostonian or Embryo made of 1/16" square stock and is much easier and quicker to build.

There are changes that I made to eliminate what I considered weak points in the original prototype. (Compare "bones shot" photos.) The area behind the nose former is deeper, there is a top and bottom panel in the nose to box it in. The nose block key is deeper, the cockpit side window and the hole under it has been reshaped, there is another cross piece at the bottom of the fuselage in the area under the wing and the last lightening hole in the fuselage side, under the elevator, has been eliminated. I have also changed from a 6" Peck prop (150 mm, Pecks are actually metric.) to the one gram heavier 6" EB prop to get it to balance with out ballast.
thanks for the information
So i have to try something like that on my new rubber FF that I'm going to build ....wish you could share a video of its flight too
Jul 27, 2017, 03:57 PM
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I did manage to get a short video of the OD-17 flying with just enough winds on it to ROG. I was limited in the time I had because the Penny Plane contest was starting.

Short Flight of OD-17 (0 min 23 sec)




More next week.
Aug 06, 2017, 12:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kittyfritters
I did manage to get a short video of the OD-17 flying with just enough winds on it to ROG. I was limited in the time I had because the Penny Plane contest was starting.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBAZbaCDhok



More next week.



Wowww. ...beautiful. .... what a smooth take off ...really great
Aug 18, 2017, 11:55 AM
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In spite of the suggestion, by one of the more mischievous members of the group, that I should have designed the model and passed out the kits without testing it simply to enjoy the chaos that resulted I spent some time testing it. The flying characteristics of the OD-17 indoors did not satisfy me. For a "generic airplane" (That's what one of the O.F.F.C. members said I should call it.) it required a little too much effort to trim. I had a bit of a tip stall in a tight turn when the power ran down. Suspecting that the 12% airfoil that is used was to blame I redrew the wing with a 10% airfoil and added a little more dihedral. It built the new wing, yesterday, and tested it this morning. Voila! Outdoors and indoors it simply flies. The design is finalized and as soon as I have the instructions edited on the plan the kit will be available. The first dozen kits are for the O.F.F.C. members (The contest is at the end of October.) then it will be available on my web site. There are two more similarly constructed models on the "drawing board".

Keep 'Em Flying!

Howard
Oct 06, 2017, 06:54 PM
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The dozen kits for the O.F.F.C. members to fly in the One Design contest have been completed and distributed, and I have orders for a few more from the members. This should be a great Beta Test of the design in case it needs a few tweaks before I put it on my web site.

The Plain Plane (OD-17) worked out so well that I decided to add two more simplified, beginner's kits to my product line. Since I am home bound during recovery from my hip replacement I am catching up on several design projects and getting some long delayed kits into production. The next beginner's kit will be the Satellite. The photo is the prototype covered before I shrank the tissue. I've already redesigned it to make it easier to build. (The way I did the butterfly tail is beyond beginner level.) should be reporting on flight trials next week.

The next one will be a biplane. Double Trouble.
Oct 11, 2017, 08:35 PM
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Glad to see some kits for beginners in mind. my only real success in rubber power has been with stick fuselage model types so far. i have on order a sparrow hawk sports flyer with the same type idea in mind and wish i knew about your design before i placed that overseas order lol. any way i think ill be in touch with you soon . cheers to you


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