Is the Auto-g2 a good auto gyro to start on? - RC Groups
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Jun 23, 2017, 09:33 AM
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Is the Auto-g2 a good auto gyro to start on?


So ive been doing a bunch of research on the auto-g2 and heard many places it is one of the best ways to get into autogyros. I got one for christmas and just now started putting the rest of it together. I bought it to club today though and one of the guys said that it is an extremely hard model to fly. Now im a bit concerned whether or not i should fly it. I have been flying rc planes for over 5 or 6 years. Do you think i would be able to fly it? Or should i put it away and start with something else? He said that his friend had one and was a very experienced pilot and still crashed it on landing. He reccomended i start on a twin twirl instead. What do you guys think? Thanks in advance!
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Jun 23, 2017, 12:03 PM
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bump
Jun 23, 2017, 04:06 PM
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Using all the advice here, especially in the long G2 thread, you will succeed!
Landing an autogyro is easy - if you land exactly into the wind. Any cross wind may end in desaster. And be aware that the rotor is still spinning after touch down. Any wind gust can still throw it to pieces.
Jun 24, 2017, 04:44 PM
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roidspop's Avatar
Buy several sets of spare blades! If you have trouble finding them on HK, look for SKU 310000104.

Attach the blades with only the outer bolt; put a toothpick through the inner hole. Consider going over to a fiberglass delta plate instead of the HK version.

If possible, reinforce the tailwheel connection to the plug that goes into the fuselage tube; it tends to break off and is difficult to replace. I've used carbon fiber straps glued on to that section and it has held up for around two hundred landings.

When the propellor blade finally breaks, it can be replaced with a 10x6" two-blade prop which performs just as well or better than the original.

I can't swear to this, but one person reports that applying a coating of red thread-locking compound to the lower section of the flexible rotor drive cable will prevent it from unravelling.

As part of the pre-flight test, watch BOTH of the roll servos while you operate them to make sure they are both functioning. Crashes are very hard on these servos and I've had flights where only one side was being driven and the other side was frozen.

Learn the gyro takeoff system before ever attempting to fly! You can read about it in the G2 thread, but it's simple. Always takeoff into the wind. Engage pre-rotator. Start takeoff roll at about half throttle. Wait for rotor to reach flight rpm. Smoothly go to full power and allow plane to fly off...don't try to yank it off or rush adding power. Disconnect rotor drive immediately after takeoff. It may not be necessary to keep power on the pre-rotator during the takeoff roll but it seems to help mine get airborne a little faster.

In the air, the gyro is very easy to fly, but there may be some trimming quirks. If I pull power while in level flight, the gyro will often pitch up. Just be aware of this and adjust power and pitch input as needed.

I hope you have a wonderful time flying your gyro; best wishes for a happy maiden flight!
Jun 24, 2017, 04:47 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by roidspop
Buy several sets of spare blades! If you have trouble finding them on HK, look for SKU 310000104.

Attach the blades with only the outer bolt; put a toothpick through the inner hole. Consider going over to a fiberglass delta plate instead of the HK version.

If possible, reinforce the tailwheel connection to the plug that goes into the fuselage tube; it tends to break off and is difficult to replace. I've used carbon fiber straps glued on to that section and it has held up for around two hundred landings.

When the propellor blade finally breaks, it can be replaced with a 10x6" two-blade prop which performs just as well or better than the original.

I can't swear to this, but one person reports that applying a coating of red thread-locking compound to the lower section of the flexible rotor drive cable will prevent it from unravelling.

As part of the pre-flight test, watch BOTH of the roll servos while you operate them to make sure they are both functioning. Crashes are very hard on these servos and I've had flights where only one side was being driven and the other side was frozen.

Learn the gyro takeoff system before ever attempting to fly! You can read about it in the G2 thread, but it's simple. Always takeoff into the wind. Engage pre-rotator. Start takeoff roll at about half throttle. Wait for rotor to reach flight rpm. Smoothly go to full power and allow plane to fly off...don't try to yank it off or rush adding power. Disconnect rotor drive immediately after takeoff. It may not be necessary to keep power on the pre-rotator during the takeoff roll but it seems to help mine get airborne a little faster.

In the air, the gyro is very easy to fly, but there may be some trimming quirks. If I pull power while in level flight, the gyro will often pitch up. Just be aware of this and adjust power and pitch input as needed.

I hope you have a wonderful time flying your gyro; best wishes for a happy maiden flight!
Thank you!
Jun 24, 2017, 05:18 PM
Registered User

Sorry...I Disagree


Canteloupeman,

We've been there. Both my son and I are very experienced R/C airplane pilots. I have been flying for 35 years and he for 15 years. Both of us found that model autogyros are THE most difficult R/C models to set up and fly, although once you do learn to fly them, it is lot's of addictive fun!

That means even your 5 years experience won't prevent you from crashing that nice new model. I strongly recommend you start with something easy and low cost. The twin Twirl is a good model to get your feet wet, because it handles more like an airplane, yet some like an autogyro. You can get a feel for autorotation and slow fly performance, and the importance of rotor speed. Take a look at this video:
Twirl Senior (5 min 3 sec)


When we started out trying to fly single rotor autogyros, we crashed every time out to the field. This is a common experience for most pilots, so why mess up that nice model? We started with a modified CraneFly....no landing gear, just a carbon fiber arrow shaft mounted horizontally with bright tips. Tip-overs caused the most damage, and that approach prevents them so you can get back into the air easier.

After that, I think you would be better off with a foam model that is easy to repair and one that can take a beating like Rich Harris' Whippit, or my Cactus Hopper. I posted free plans, and materials to build one cost a whopping $1. Then when you crash, and trust me....you will, repairs are quick so you can get back at it. Don't get discouraged...keep picking up the pieces and carry on. The reward is worth the difficult journey. Then, when you have the experience and skills bring out that pretty model and tear up the sky with a huge smile on your face!

Cheers,
Russ
Jun 24, 2017, 06:08 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by rus1
Canteloupeman,

We've been there. Both my son and I are very experienced R/C airplane pilots. I have been flying for 35 years and he for 15 years. Both of us found that model autogyros are THE most difficult R/C models to set up and fly, although once you do learn to fly them, it is lot's of addictive fun!

That means even your 5 years experience won't prevent you from crashing that nice new model. I strongly recommend you start with something easy and low cost. The twin Twirl is a good model to get your feet wet, because it handles more like an airplane, yet some like an autogyro. You can get a feel for autorotation and slow fly performance, and the importance of rotor speed. Take a look at this video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yTE8FoRUPWU

When we started out trying to fly single rotor autogyros, we crashed every time out to the field. This is a common experience for most pilots, so why mess up that nice model? We started with a modified CraneFly....no landing gear, just a carbon fiber arrow shaft mounted horizontally with bright tips. Tip-overs caused the most damage, and that approach prevents them so you can get back into the air easier.

After that, I think you would be better off with a foam model that is easy to repair and one that can take a beating like Rich Harris' Whippit, or my Cactus Hopper. I posted free plans, and materials to build one cost a whopping $1. Then when you crash, and trust me....you will, repairs are quick so you can get back at it. Don't get discouraged...keep picking up the pieces and carry on. The reward is worth the difficult journey. Then, when you have the experience and skills bring out that pretty model and tear up the sky with a huge smile on your face!

Cheers,
Russ
Okay. So start out with a twin twirl and then try a simple single rotor thats easy to fix?
Jun 25, 2017, 10:19 AM
Registered User
That's about it. You can find the free plan and step-by-step building video for the twin Twirl at flitetest.com. Type "Twirl" in the search box.

Crane Fly info and pdfs can be found here: forums/showthread.php?1797111-Crane-Fly-Autogyro

Good Luck...and enjoy!
Jun 26, 2017, 02:20 AM
Mike's Ma Maaaaaaaaan

Sorry, I Disagree........


I have also been around the block a few times and have to agree that Single Rotor Auto Gyros are challenging to fly (but the good thing is that the fun factor far outweighs the difficulties).

However, having flown a twin rotor AG for a number of years starting some 20 odd years ago and then getting into single rotors around 5 years ago, IMHO you won't learn anything from a twin rotor. Far, far easier to fly, I actually used to use my twin (DB Sport and Scale) as a trainer form learning to fly fixed wing because she flew so docile. In addition 2 fixed free wheeling rotors aren't going to give you much scope to learn/ think about the hairydynamics......

Not going to comment on how good (or bad) a G2 may be as I don't own one and have never flown one but have read loads of many 'entry level' pilots successfully cutting their AG teeth on that model in the dedicated thread so I see no reason why you shouldn't succeed.

I actually started on single rotor with the Monotwirl and then moved onto the Crane Fly, both models still fine and I can highly recommend both really don't know if it would be worth the trouble of building a new model when you already have one. My 2 Cents worth would be to spend a while on here reading to gather as many tips and tricks that you can and then slowly go for it.

Paul

Jun 26, 2017, 05:36 PM
Registered User
roidspop's Avatar
I agree that the twin rotor Twirl-type won't teach you much about flying a single rotor, since the handling is totally different...but they're fun to fly regardless and you'll enjoy one.

There is a DIY single rotor model that is worth considering...the AG-3 (found on the autogyro forum). It uses dollar-store foam/Depron for the fuselage and rotor. It's simple to build and will teach you a lot about flying the roll-control head/elevator/rudder system. If you break it, and you will, it's reparable or easily replaced if the damage is too bad. It or any other simple DIY gyro would be a good starting point to step up to the G2. Harris's models are great, but I've only built his Burky II so can't comment on the others...but they're going to be MUCH tougher than the one I mentioned because of the foam used in them. There is a non-trivial issue with that line however...the blades are not available from a US producer anymore and would either have to be hand-made or imported from England (not sure if that source is still in production). Not a show-stopper, but it complicates things.

Shoot...if you've got five years of flying, I think you can just do fine with the G2...the take off is the only big step you have to master and it's not hard. As to crashes, if you do the single-bolt attachment, you probably won't break the head and the blades have a better chance of surviving ground strikes. The fuselage is pretty tough as is the mast. The tail wheel will break off after a few hard landings. The very worst damage tends to come in a forced takeoff with low rotor speed...so just don't force it!
Jun 27, 2017, 10:49 AM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by roidspop
I agree that the twin rotor Twirl-type won't teach you much about flying a single rotor, since the handling is totally different...but they're fun to fly regardless and you'll enjoy one.

There is a DIY single rotor model that is worth considering...the AG-3 (found on the autogyro forum). It uses dollar-store foam/Depron for the fuselage and rotor. It's simple to build and will teach you a lot about flying the roll-control head/elevator/rudder system. If you break it, and you will, it's reparable or easily replaced if the damage is too bad. It or any other simple DIY gyro would be a good starting point to step up to the G2. Harris's models are great, but I've only built his Burky II so can't comment on the others...but they're going to be MUCH tougher than the one I mentioned because of the foam used in them. There is a non-trivial issue with that line however...the blades are not available from a US producer anymore and would either have to be hand-made or imported from England (not sure if that source is still in production). Not a show-stopper, but it complicates things.

Shoot...if you've got five years of flying, I think you can just do fine with the G2...the take off is the only big step you have to master and it's not hard. As to crashes, if you do the single-bolt attachment, you probably won't break the head and the blades have a better chance of surviving ground strikes. The fuselage is pretty tough as is the mast. The tail wheel will break off after a few hard landings. The very worst damage tends to come in a forced takeoff with low rotor speed...so just don't force it!
That ag 3 sounds cool! Can you link me to it? I couldn't find it on the forum.
Jun 27, 2017, 01:20 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cantaloupeman
That ag 3 sounds cool! Can you link me to it? I couldn't find it on the forum.
Well, not easy to find. I hope this is meant:
https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...2#post14719082
https://www.google.de/url?sa=t&rct=j...a68jCKsLlkijdw

Video here:
https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...&postcount=172
Last edited by Ralf W.; Jun 27, 2017 at 02:40 PM.
Jun 28, 2017, 04:31 AM
Mike's Ma Maaaaaaaaan
Very similar to the AG-3 in concept, the one that I chose:-

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...ctric-Autogyro

can't remember why I went for that one over the AG-3, I remember that I had both plans printed and on my bench but for some reason or other I went for the Monotwirl.

If you just want a quick no-risk, low-cost rotary experience look at the Jupiter Kwirl from Thomas B.

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...-download-plan

Great fun even if it is 'cheating' (as in not a tilting head)...........

Paul

Jun 28, 2017, 11:25 AM
Registered User

This says 6mm depron but can I just use Dollar tree foam board instead? It's alot cheaper. The only thing I'm not sure how to do would be the fuse because it looks like it is two pieces of depron glued together
Jun 28, 2017, 12:36 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cantaloupeman
This says 6mm depron but can I just use Dollar tree foam board instead? It's alot cheaper. The only thing I'm not sure how to do would be the fuse because it looks like it is two pieces of depron glued together
I don't expect any problems using Dollar tree foam board nor building the fuselage differently.


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