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May 19, 2017, 09:40 AM
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Build Log

FPV MiniRaceWing with iNav Omnibus F4 Pro


Intro

With a few friends we decided to buy/build the same wing with similar components. Here is the story how this adventure advances. Will be updates when time goes by. The innovative things in this project for me are the wing, the iNav flight controller and the Wolfbox reciever. I am only used to drones. The build log is written more in the form factor of a tutorial, as to help other people building the same (like my friends).

Parts list/Specifications
  • Wing: MiniRaceWing
  • ESC: FVT LittleBee Spring 40A
  • Motor: X-FOOT 2207 2600KV
  • Prop: DALProp Cyclone 5050C
  • Battery: Drone Lab CHAOS Edition 1300mah 4s 75-150c (Basically a 4cell battery I have already)
  • Servos: EMAX ES08MA II
  • FC: Omnibus F4 Pro with baro / Omnibus F4 V2 Flight Controller
  • GPS: HOLYBRO Micro UBLOX NEO-M8N
  • PDB (for 5V & 12V): Matek Mini Power Hub w/BEC (5V and 12V)
  • Mounting hardware: Stand-offs, a active buzzer and this Flight Controller Mount or this Flight Controller Mount.
  • Receiver: Wolfbox Taranis compatible transmitter and receiver.
  • FPV Cam: HS1177 or RunCam Split (I switched to RunCam Split now)
  • FPV link: Partom FPV 1.2G

Extra Tools and Parts

This is a list of tools that I didn't know I needed when I thought about building this wing.
  • CA glue, Super glue, epoxy for spars and servo's
  • White laminate for balsa elevons or tape.
  • Clear laminate for wing halves, I do not recommend laminating at this point to prevent deformation. It's a racewing, not an endurance wing.
  • Hobby iron for laminating
  • Coloured tape for creative template finish
  • Clear (reinforced) tape for strengthening leading edges
  • Clear (reinforced or hinged) tape for the balsa elevons
  • Double sided tape for easy mounting of certain parts, like positioning vtx, rx, gps
  • Wire (like 28AWG, silocone)
  • Torx T10 screwdriver because the set comes with torx screws
  • Parts to make 1.2G antenna's
  • ...things I forgot

Building - Wing

The unboxed content as how the MiniRaceWing arrives by mail:

A few impressions on the building process of the MiniRaceWing is continued after the intermezzo of configuring the Wolfbox module and the wiring schematics of OmnibusF4Pro to all the components on the wing.

Setting up Wolfbox
  • Out of the box the Wolfbox is confirmed working but in order to connect the Omnibus with the receiver using PPM signal the settings have to be changed, and in order to change the settings the Wolfbox has to be updated to the latest version of openLRSng.
  • Updating Receiver
    Updating the receiver firmware goes as shown in this youtube video. In short you have to wire up the receiver with an FTDI adapter as shown in this wiring diagram: You will read on the internet that you should use a 3.3V FTDI to not damage the RF module but the VCC pins on the Wolfbox run past a build in 3.3V regulator so that no damage is done to the module powering it with 5V. Alternately you can apply power and ground on the channel pins on the left (that are rated 5V compliant). Don't forget to screw on an antenna, without antenna the RF module will die.

    Then using the chrome openLRSng - Configurator to be found here you can update the receiver module. In the application go to firmware flasher. Select as board "RX" and specify in the drop down menu "3 - Hobbyking OrangeRx". This is because the Wolfbox RX is based on the hardware type 3 like the OrangeRX receiver. Next click "Flash Firmware". Like this:

    If all goes well you have a message saying that flashing was successful and the receiver's red led should be lit up.

    For me this was not the case, somehow all memory in the Atmel was gone and the board was essentially bricked. I had to reburn the bootloader onto the receivers Atmel chip as shown here. And flash the chip as described above after a new bootloader was on the chip. This requires some advanced soldering though, only try this when you are a soldering wizard, otherwise consult a soldering wizard.
  • Updating Transmitter
    Updating the transmitter firmware goes as shown in this youtube video. In short you have to wire up the transmitter with an FTDI adapter as shown in this wiring diagram: You do not connect VCC but power the module while it sits inside the Taranis module bay, only connect the ground connection, not VCC. Remove the selection jumper (see wiring picture) so it is on "UART" and not "SPRT or NORM"! Don't forget to screw on an antenna, without antenna the RF module will die.

    Again in the "openLRSng - Configurator" on the firmware flasher page, select as board "TX" and specify in the drop down menu "2 - Hobbyking OrangeRx". Next click "Flash Firmware". Note: You have to turn on the taranis and apply power to the external module bay before flashing the firmware, to do that you have to turn on the external module in PPM in the Taranis settings, meanwhile you can turn of the internal module. The Configurator settings are like this:

    If all goes well you should have a message saying that flashing was successful. Leave the FTDI connections in place as to setup the modules.
  • Transmitter & Receiver Settings
    Small intermezzo: if you would like to use the wolfbox link with telemetry feedback or not requires a different setup. Enabling or disabling telemetry has it's adventages/disadventages. If you read up under Telemetry you will read the pro's and con's. Here is explained how to set things up using telemetry.
    Let's set up the transmitter and receiver module to use it together with the Omnibus FC. Power cycle the Taranis and leave the firmware flasher tab. Within the "openLRSng - Configurator" connect with the transmitter module (press "Connect"). In the "TX module" tab change the value of Telemetry to "Yes - FrSky" and Mute buzzer (mostly) to "Yes", only change both settings if you are using a Taranis, this enables the ability to have RSSI feedback in the Taranis, also the Taranis warns you in case of a signal loss. If you are not using a Taranis there is no need to turn on telemetry and you get a audio feedback on signal loss if you do not mute the buzzer. I also changed Operating Frequency to "430000" and Maximum desired frequency to "440000" to be within the HAM band of Belgium. Click "Randomize" next to Number of Hop channels and click "Save to EEPROM". A visual summery of all the settings:


    The receiver will be updated wireless over the UHF link. To setup the receiver go to the "RX Module" tab within the Configurator. You should see a loading icon. Now turn on the receiver module (using one of the channel output pins, using a BEC). At this moment the transmitter should connect up with the receiver and the tab page should load and all the settings become available. If not power cycle the receiver to try to connect again, the receiver has a brief window on boot to allow to connect with a transmitter.
    Change the Inject RSSI on servo channel to "8 (RSSI)". Change Port 6 to "PPM" this means on the pin marked 5 the PPM signal will become available. All the hassle of updating the Wolfbox firmware to be able to change this crucial setting. Click "Save to EEPROM". A visual summery of these settings:

    While in this settings menu click "Edit Failsafe Values" and enable channel 1 to 7 (check "Set" so that if you set failsafe using the button on the transmitter module they are also changed. The values do not matter as once you set the failsafe using the button on the transmitter module they are overwritten. Click "Save to EEPROM" again. It makes sense to lock channel 8 with the value of 1000 since that indicates a low RSSI. A visual summery of these failsafe settings:

  • Binding Transmitter & Receiver
    You can now disconnect in the openLRSng - Configurator. Power down the receiver, turn off the Taranis and remove the FTDI wires. Now reinsert the Selection Jumper in the Wolfbox transmitter on SPRT. Hold the bind button next to this selection jumper while powering on the Taranis again. After hearing one beep (or max 5 seconds) release this button, the transmitter should start beeping. Although you changed the receiver settings using the transmitter the receiver is not yet bound to the transmitter and has to be rebound ever time you change settings in the transmitter module (in a good case only once in a lifetime). Power up the receiver module, if they bind successfully the beeping stops. Power cycle the transmitter and receiver module, both modules should light up green if a successful links is established.
  • RSSI telemetry in Taranis
    In the Taranis settings page for telemetry you select FrSky D telemetry and discover new sensors, RSSI should be found. If you power down the receiver a RSSI lost warning should be audible on the Taranis. It is possible this is working out of the box, without touching the settings. Full telemetry with the feedback of battery voltage can be set up and is explained in another paragraph.

  • Setting failsafe on the Wolfbox
    For completeness this is also written here, it makes more sense to set up failsafe after wiring up the Wolfbox receiver with the Omnibus F4 Pro and having the link working there.
    If no failsafe has been set the receiver keeps on repeating the last channel positions after the link has been lost. The red led on the receiver lights up when signal is lost (try this by turning off the taranis). To set failsafe, hold the stick positions in the desired state and push the bind button on the transmitter just once. A beep should be audible while the failsafe has been set.
    Test out if failsafe is working by turning off the transmitter and checking within iNav Configurator's Receiver tab if everything is changing as it should!
Wiring up - Adding iNav to the wing

Omnibus F4 Pro with GPS, a wiring diagram gives a better overview then the messy wires itself:
Warning: Some GPS modules are not 5V but only 3.3V, in that case source the 3.3V elsewhere on the board. Connecting to 5V will damage such GPS modules. Although it might just work on 5V as wel as 3.3V.


Omnibus F4 Pro with receiver:
  • Wiring FrSky X8R or FrSky X4R-SB with Omnibus F4 Pro using SBUS (inverted SBUS to be more specific).
    Wiring goes as follows, no hardware altering has to be done. Ether wiring up with a X8R of X4R-SB, not both simultaneously.
  • Wiring FrSky X4R-SB with uninverted SBUS. Or wiring Rlink with Omnibus F4 Pro using (uninverted) SBUS.
    The solution to this is at first rather a difficult problem, the solution is to bypass the inverter on the Omnibus F4 Pro board by connecting straight to UART1. The wiring diagram below shows how to wire the non-inverted SBUS from X4R-SB to the UART1 header. This is tested and confirmed. The set-up in INAV Configurator is completely identical as the setup for inverted SBUS, the only difference is where you connect to the board.
  • Wiring FrSky X4R-SB in CPPM mode with Omnibus F4 Pro. Wiring OpenLRS in PPM mode with Omnibus F4 Pro. Wiring PPM with Omnibus F4 Pro. No hardware altering is necessary although you lose the UART1 RX functionality.
  • Wiring Wolfbox receiver wiht Omnibus F4 Pro using PPM. No hardware altering is necessary although you lose the UART1 RX functionality.

Omnibus F4 Pro with battery, ESC:
When selecting the model "Flying Wing" in the configuration tab in INAV Configurator the flowing schematic is shown:

This shows that the motor is connected to ether output 1 or 2. The left elevon servo is connected to output 3 and the right elevon servo is connected to output 4. Connecting the XT60 male connector to the Omnibus F4 Pro and connecting the ESC to the flight controller goes as shown in the following wiring diagram:

It is a best practice to only connect the XT60 male connector positive voltage lead to the pad marked "BAT+" and to connect all peripherals requiring battery voltage to the pad "MOTO_VCC". Peripherals could be voltage regulators, FPV gear,... This way their current consumption is also measured. All negative leads, as well as from the battery as from the ESC or other peripherals, are soldered together on the big pad marked "GND" on the back of the flight controller.

Connecting Omnibus F4 Pro with servos:
As shown in the minimalistic schematic when selecting the flying wing model the left elevon servo is connected to output 3 and the right elevon servo is connected to output 4. On the Omnibus F4 Pro board the positive voltage rail on these outputs (1 to 4) isn't powered. When connecting the servos they wont work if there is no positive voltage applied to this rail. To provide power to the servo's and later the FPV equipment I suggest the use of the matek mini power hub that has a 5V and a 12V BEC. I will use the 5V BEC solely for the two servos as the servos might draw much current on big movements and bring the voltage down, although the BEC is rated 3A, this is more then sufficient for two servos. The Omnibus F4 Pro does have a selection mechanism to use the highest 5V provided as the overall voltage for the board, as I would like to use the internal switching voltage regulator to power just the board, the receiver and the GPS I might remove this selection diode. Wiring up the two servos and the PDB with the 5V BEC goes as shown in the following wiring diagram:


Connecting Omnibus F4 Pro with camera and VTX for OSD:
Since the 5V BEC on the PDB is used only to power the servos I will use the 12V BEC to power the FPV equipment. The VTX requires 12V and thus has to be powered using a 12V BEC. The FPV camera has a wide imput voltage range but I like to power it also through the BEC as this smooths out voltage spikes, the BEC has a very small LC chain build in. The camera could alternatively be powered straight from the battery (use a set of motor output pins on the Matek PDB). Note that an extra ground wire is placed between the OSD AGND pad and the negative pad from the 5V BEC. This is to improve reliability of the OSD and is recommended. The RAM pads are deliberately not used because powering anything from these pads and thus using the VBAT or 5V selection mechanism have reported faulty behaviour of the Omnibus board, in short don't use them if you don't need them. The wiring is shown in the following diagram:


Connecting Omnibus F4 Pro with a buzzer:
Just for completion here is how to wire an active buzzer with the flight controller, I like to have the possibility for audio feedback and lost model alarm:


Building - Wing - Continued

Building the wing itself is explained in detail in the manual provided by the manufacturer and available at flybot.de. Here is the assembled main pod without electronics:

Since the clipping mechanism for the wing halves is attached on the bottom plate the 3D printed mount for the OmnibusF4Pro doesn't easily fit on the bottom plate. Because of that the FC mount is attached to the top plate and the FC hangs on the mount. The flight controller is mounted on in a way that it is oriented flat and pointing forward when it is mounted. Overall it is easier to remove the bottom plate in order to work on the inside than removing the camera mount and top plate, I feel only advantages mounting it this way.
The main pot assembled and fit with all the electronics:

The main pod more detailed picture of FC mount and guts of the pod.

The elevons connected with servo, this is probably how you do it, but it looked so nice here is a general impression. Note that the balsa elevons have been laminated in white and look very nice that way. The wing itself will be laminted with clear laminate.

The rods glued into the foam. I didn't like the glue as it sticks in 1 second but it worked out. The glue runs in between cracks if there is space so that's nice. I used this one because I don't know any better ones yet. If you have suggestions, shoot!

The wings laminated and a few decals and decoration. The bottom has more red-white stripes to be easily seen as divert from the top. It's actually not recommended to laminate the wing as the lamination creates warp or deformation of the wing halves. But iNav can handle this, this means both flaps won't be identical in neutral position.

That's the wing finished, now off to setting up iNav and flying.

Setting up iNav

For setting up the FC I recommend to follow the guide on the iNav wiki as linked here. To clarify a few steps they are written here in detail. But most of it is a duplicate as described in the wiki.
First comes flashing the latest hardware. Even here the learning curve is steep. In order the flash a new firmware to the board you have to do the following steps:
  1. Pushing the boot button while connecting the board to the computer (Alternatively you can type 'DFU' in the cli to enter the bootloader mode without button-pressing and reconnecting)
  2. Flash the board with latest iNav, this only works if the board is recognized in DFU mode, if not you have to replace the driver with Zadig as shown in the picture and follow these steps (you can skip if it's recognized as DFU); In menu "Option" check "List All Devices", Select "STM32 BOOTLOADER" and click "Replace Driver" .
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  3. DFU mode should be selected in the top right corner, go to Firmware Flasher.
  4. Select "OMNIBUSF4PRO" as board and latest firmware (1.7.1 as of writing).
  5. Activate "No reboot sequence" and do not activate "Full chip erase". (With "Full chip erase" board gets stuck in flashing, using the boot button while reconnecting might revive the flashing ability if you do not activate "Full chip erase".)
  6. Click "Load Firmware [Online]" and "Flash Firmware".

Now the board if flashed time to set it up. After connecting to the board in the regular way in ports tab activate GPS on UART6.


In the Configuration tab, assign the Compass "HMC5883". This might have been detected automatically.
Be sure to check and set compass alignment under 'MAG Alignment'. In the Setup tab the model should not drift when pointing any direction, drift means non correct alignment and will result in bad behaviour. If you are not sure about the alignment it's better do disable the magnetometer by setting it to 'NONE'. For me the 'CW 270 flip' did the trick, the flip makes sense because the chip is at the bottom of the board. Also perform a 'Calibrate Magnetometer' on the Setup tab, if the option is greyed out this is because runtime calibration is not yet finished (takes 2 to 5 minutes), move between tab pages and this option will become available.

Enable the GPS using "UBLOX" as Protocol. The GPS symbol should be blue even without a position lock. A red GPS icon means the GPS isn't working as it should, like when it's not connected or there is a bad connection.

Enable Battery current monitoring. Using the information found in this thread I calculated a scale value of 220. Due to different versions of the FC it's recommended to go over there and calculate the scale value from practical resistance measurements. Banggood's board needs a value of 550, it's current reading limit is 60A.


Setting up the receiver in INAV Configurator using (un)inverted SBUS: (PPM below)
  • In the INAV Configurator Ports tab you have to enable serial RX for UART1. And disable MSP on UART1 if this was enabled before. Click "Save and Reboot".
  • In the Configuration tab under Receiver Mode select "Serial based receiver (..SBUS..)" and for Serial Receiver Provider choose "SBUS" from the drop down menu. Click "Save and Reboot".
  • In the Receiver tab you should see the bars moving corresponding the movement on your transmitter. I had to change the Channel Map to "TAER1234" to have the correct movement. This is due to custom channel arrangement in my Taranis.
Setting up the receiver in INAV Configurator using PPM (As needed for Wolfbox):
  • In the INAV Configurator Configuration tab under Receiver Mode select "PPM RX imput". Click "Save and Reboot". Nothing has to be changed in the Ports tab.
  • In the Receiver tab you should see the bars moving corresponding the movement on your transmitter. I had to change the Channel Map to "TAER1234" to have the correct movement. This is due to custom channel arrangement in my Taranis. In this tab change RSSI Channel from "Disabled" to "8", this will enable RSSI to be shown on the OSD later on. Press "Save". It's a good time to set failsafe while you can see the bars moving.
Pre First Flight Checklist

Next to all above here are a few listed items you also have to do, please go through the complete setup on the iNav wiki first, these should be remainders and not new things:
  • Do The 6 point callibration
  • Update the ESC with lates firmware
  • Set the correct motor protocol (mulishot?)
  • Enable motor and servo output
  • Calibrate the ESC
  • Check the motor direction, invert the motor direction
  • Be mad at BL Heli to have removed to ability to turn of damped light, now you have to spin the motor while armed just to be sure, or not, it's preferences.
  • Do a high five test
  • Fix servo limits and directions because the high five test failed
  • Check MAG alignment!! Set mag alignment, model should not drift in setup tab in configurator
  • Do a compass calibration, you have to wait until the end of runtime calibration before you can do a compass calibration. (wait 2 minutes)
  • Set OSD layout as wanted, set video protocol.
  • Reupload fonts
  • Read up on flight modes
  • Set flight modes: I have no recommendations but some suggested on the web are: Arm, Passthrough, Angle, RTH , ...sugested by wiki: Servo Autotrim and Autotune, ....if you have even more sticks: Altitude hold, Beeper
  • Set Failsafe Test Failsafe without compass you have to run with the wing to test as if it flies.
  • Check the center of gravity, correct the CG.

Maiden Flight/First Flight
Check the centre of gravity and adjust it to the beginner method using this calculator: http://fwcg.3dzone.dk/. More on CG in this video. With the CG too much to the back the wing will fly straight upwards (because the wings are too heavy/the back is too heavy) following by a tumble and it goes head first down.
Check the magnetometer alignment, with it setup wrongly the model will not point to the launched direction, good case it will fly but in another direction then intended in launch, worst case (usually when trying to fly a steeper angle) it will perform roll flips, and result in a crash).
Check the angle of levelled flight by swinging the wing around constantly while holding the wingtip. Put the wing down under this angle. Adjust the board alignment to this levelled flight, do this easily by checking OSD, the horizon line should be centred when board alignment matches current alignment. Possibly take a few degrees extra then the wing will fly upwards after launch and not downwards to the ground. A standard angle laying the wing flat on the table could result in a downward flight path in Angle mode, this will brake your first few launches. A sightly too much upward angle will result in the wing slowly climbing, this could be more wanted for first flights.
If you have crashes on maiden that was fixed by checking one of the above three major reasons I have seen, nice. If you had even another problem and found a solution that could help out other first flyers please share!

Possibly the easiest method to launch a wing is the sky hook method, preferably done by a friend with two hands. The following procedure is how I launch my wing, it's fairly easy and therefore I would recommend. For launching I switch to Acro mode, arm and trottle to 80% while holding the wing under the wanted flyaway angle. Then I aid it in the air in a straight line, it doesn't feel so important to throw it with force. Immediately after I and switching to RTL as soon as possible. Then take my time to relax, take a good position, set the wanted flight mode (Angle(=Stabelized) mode if first flight), lower throttle and once I feel like it switch off RTL.

About FPV
A little about FPV. Using the Partom 1.2G system the link is nice. Goes an OK long way compared to 5.8G.
At first DIY dipole antenna's have been made. The elements have been made out of bike brake wire, as it's bendable and retains shape after crashes.
On the RX side a DIY BiQuad antenna has been made.
The UHF signal gets in the VRX and therefore a repeater is used from 1.2G to 5.8G that is 50 meter away from TX control. Although this because of the Chinese quality of the VRX, RMRC has receivers that are better (made for this hobby) and have no interference from UHF. I upgraded to an RMRC receiver.

Telemetry
Although telemetry is awesome when you have a Taranis and dropped the use of an OSD while flying FPV drones. When flying a FPV wing chances are big you will have an OSD that shows everything and more than what telemetry can show. For me the only added value of telemetry is the same as when flying drones, RSSI warnings and battery voltage feedback, with a low battery warning set on the Taranis. Yet both are already implemented in the OSD settings. It is worth to consider dropping telemetry all together and relying on the OSD for battery and RSSI feedback. Having two downlinks from the wing (UHF and 1.2 video) isn't always necessary and always wanted. A little pro and con decision making:
  • No telemetry:
    • Pro: Faster RC update rates
    • Pro: Possibility to use SBUS instead of PPM
    • Pro: No UHF radiation from the wing.
    • Con: No RSSI low or Telemetry lost alarms
  • Yes telemetry:
    • Pro: RSSI low and Telemetry lost alarms in Taranis
    • Pro: Battery feedback on Taranis.
    • Pro: Perfect for line of sight flying.
    • Con: PPM instead of SBUS.
    • Con: Slower update rates (yet are you that fast?)
Personally I like telemetry feedback and after a long search I finally figured out how to get it working with openLRSng. Here is how I got it working:
  • Setting up the Wolfbox to accept telemetry from the flight controller and to pass it on to the Taranis, if you followed the steps to set up the Wolfbox then this should be working correctly. In short you have to select in TX for telemetry "Yes - FrSky" and have the RX working on PPM. In the RX Port 12 should be "RXD" and Port 13 should be "TXD".
  • Wiring up the Omnibus F4 Pro with the receiver. There is one extra wiring going from UART 1 TX to the RX pin on the receiver.
  • Setting up iNav to send out telemetry:
    In configurator tab "ports" set "UART1" telemetry to "FrSky", click "Save and Reboot".
  • Wolfbox receiver: Check that the selection jumper on the receiver is set to "SPRT". This selection jumper is selecting or bypassing a signal inverter. Where "SPRT" uses the signal inverter, "NORM" bypasses the signal inverter and UART breaks the connection to the Taranis pins, enabling the use of the FTDI port without interference from the Taranis.
  • Setting up the Taranis and discovering sensors:

Enjoy telemetry on the taranis!

Review

To this point the Omnibus F4 Pro is rather bad documented and therefore hard to set-up and not so nice to use.
There are a lot of variants on the Omnibus F4 Pro available, and although the stunning price point of banggoods version, do you trust it in an not too cheap model? It works, but a bit studier version that can undergo abuse from testing and setting up might be wanted but comes at a price point. The major differences between bg's version and retail versions are: a wrongly placed diode, different brand 3.3V regulators and only rated up to 60A. But it works for a wing.
The wolfbox is setup with a previous version and requires updating. Should be straightforward. The range seems to be an not as solid as wished. I upgraded the TX internally and it's working OK for now. Also on the receiver side a dipole antenna is used instead of the stock antenna.
Building the wing was super easy, the provided manual was full of instructions tips and tricks. The ejection mechanism is just perfect and saves the wing every time from bumpy landings.
At this point I do not recommend to laminate this wing, because lamination can create warp or deformation. With the ejection mechanism the chances of damage to the wing are minimal. Without lamination you save time and resources and in case of a really bad crash there are replacement parts available.
iNav's setup is good but you have to read the wiki lengthy and in full, everything is there, you just have to find it. But really everything is well documented.
Flying a wing for the first time is rather hard, a person that can fly and tune a wing the old fashion way should release you off some of the headache I' had to go through. But there is a saying that you d' have to brake a plane to learn to fly, well iNav can definitely save you a plane and you will be able to fly (in FPV, it's cheating I know).
Last edited by jelle737; Sep 12, 2017 at 06:20 AM.
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Jun 10, 2017, 04:07 AM
Registered User
I am trying to build similar configuration. GPS and RX SBUS works fine, thanks to your wiring instructions.
Quick question: do you use the same UART 1 for both telemetry and RX serial? I am trying to get telemetry on FrSky XSR.
Jun 12, 2017, 04:28 AM
Registered User
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by Terc
I am trying to build similar configuration. GPS and RX SBUS works fine, thanks to your wiring instructions.
Quick question: do you use the same UART 1 for both telemetry and RX serial? I am trying to get telemetry on FrSky XSR.
Technically that is impossible because both have a different baud rate. When using SBUS and GPS (and compass) you are out of physical UART's. I guess you can choose a softserial. This is on of the main reason why I choose PPM between receiver and flight controller.
Jun 14, 2017, 03:02 PM
FPV Surfer
aerosurfer's Avatar
Forget it, I failed to read.
Jun 18, 2017, 09:06 AM
Registered User
JulianGoesPro's Avatar
though I already build my S800 with an OmniBusF4Pro, iNav and GPS, I sure will follow this to get some inspiration to dig out my openLRS :-P
Jun 20, 2017, 11:26 PM
-NEFPV-
Any updates on this? How reliable has this system been?
Jun 21, 2017, 11:03 AM
Registered User
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by slowjett
Any updates on this? How reliable has this system been?
Still waiting on the wing itself to arrive. I followed along the build and maiden of a friend and all looked good there, very promising. Launched in acro and switched to stabilizing once in the air.

Once the wing is in, the blog will definitely be updated! Now all the components are mounted on a tray for testing purposes. The video and radiolink have been tested on RC car. If only the wing was here.
Jun 25, 2017, 05:43 PM
Registered User
So these nano/micro boards are compatible with iNav? I'm thinking of using these just because they are smaller.
Jun 26, 2017, 06:00 AM
Registered User
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zangetsu57
So these nano/micro boards are compatible with iNav? I'm thinking of using these just because they are smaller.
If the board is in the list of released hex files, you can use it with iNav. I am only using Omnibus F4 Pro because it seems future proof and has on board OSD. A baro and compass is not needed for a wing though.
Jun 27, 2017, 12:44 PM
Registered User
JulianGoesPro's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by jelle737
A baro and compass is not needed for a wing though.
I disagree, IMO there is no point in using iNav without baro, it won't keep altitude for real so no RTH (or loiter)

...but I guess you sure can have fun with the OBF4Pro without GPS as well (but whats the point in going only half way)
Jun 28, 2017, 05:55 AM
Registered User
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by JulianGoesPro
I disagree, IMO there is no point in using iNav without baro, it won't keep altitude for real so no RTH (or loiter)

...but I guess you sure can have fun with the OBF4Pro without GPS as well (but whats the point in going only half way)
Well, that is why I use an Omnibus F4 Pro myself and suggest to use that board, despite the lack of documentation. Although a I have a lot figured out and documented above. I will use it with all the features; baro, compass, GPS since I have them. It's just out of a technical point of view I was replying.
Jun 29, 2017, 04:55 PM
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JulianGoesPro's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by jelle737
Well, that is why I use an Omnibus F4 Pro myself and suggest to use that board, despite the lack of documentation. Although a I have a lot figured out and documented above. I will use it with all the features; baro, compass, GPS since I have them. It's just out of a technical point of view I was replying.
There truly is a "lack of documentation" in the "document" kind but on YT there actually are guides for the OBF4P

I will but my second board into a MiniTalon this weekend and hope it will perform well

Thanks for your guide
Jul 05, 2017, 01:57 AM
@swanlordfpv
thank you so much Jelle737 for this excellently written build log, as I've only flown quads I was just thinking why not use an F4 AIO instead of these pricey and bulky multi-component systems, and boom your post came up. lucky for me I don't have to learn wiring an F4 to a wing the hard way! I was eyeing the Wolfbox but got a cheap deal on the ezuhf JR module. supposed to support SBUS but they say it's not recommended in LR wings, wonder why...

Do keep us posted on your build and experience with the F4 setup and PIFF tuning, modes and RTH, etc!!! cheers!
Jul 08, 2017, 02:54 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by swansong6666
thank you so much Jelle737 for this excellently written build log, as I've only flown quads I was just thinking why not use an F4 AIO instead of these pricey and bulky multi-component systems, and boom your post came up. lucky for me I don't have to learn wiring an F4 to a wing the hard way! I was eyeing the Wolfbox but got a cheap deal on the ezuhf JR module. supposed to support SBUS but they say it's not recommended in LR wings, wonder why...

Do keep us posted on your build and experience with the F4 setup and PIFF tuning, modes and RTH, etc!!! cheers!
Thanks for your comment! The build log will be updated shortly since the wing itself arrived, only a few non critical parts have to arrive. The EzUHF module will probably not disappoint, I read somewhere that the PPM stream of the lite receivers doesn't work with iNav (or STM32 based FC's in general?) and does not support SBUS out of the box but there is an update available that adds SBUS functionality. I guess in short I recommend updating the firmware if that exists for EzUHF.

As for setting up iNav for use of the wing I recommend following the tutorial available on the iNav wiki. I do/will mention setting up some specific aspects more detailed and probably will add notes where I derive from the tutorial. And finally a diff dump will be provided although that might become outdated and change too much at once for a novice wing pilot.

Also today half of the pictures have been resized to be smaller, I don't want to kill the more remote user's bandwidth.
Jul 16, 2017, 09:33 AM
Registered User
Thread OP

First Flight


An update not appended to the first post. A milestone I guess. First flight!
After one day of throwing the wing in the air and repairing damages, that was summed around 10 tries max, rather a sad day with lots of joy for viewers. The next day another try and without spectators. I imagined once the wing was in the air (because the getting in the air took me so long) would be a relieve but it was rather the beginning of the next adventure.
Luckily some automated flight like RTH worked out of the box and the video did perform a bit ok.

Lot's of questions, not many answers, here is the 2nd part of the flight, first part wasn't recorded, too bad because the biggest distance was covered in the RTH climb away from home. Here is the video:

Liftoff Wing First Flight (2 min 1 sec)


These are the troubles, tips and hints for explanations and solutions welcome!
  • The OSD is flickering
  • The wing doesn't fly as smooth as I have seen others fly
  • I have to steer up all the time or it goes down
  • The UHF get's into the VRX when too close, resulting in lot's of flickering, this is because of the Chinese quality of the VRX
  • I don't know how to fly a wing, I keep trying the yaw
  • After launch the wing flies away -6 to -8 hours of the intended direction, it does a roll and tries to correct it and flies away the wrong direction.
  • I should record everything, also blackbox to analyse it later


Here is the biggest clarification. The easiest way to launch a wing is as Alex explains it here. The Sky hook method using two hands and a neck strap to hold the transmitter. Or go stand in a tower and throw it out a window.
Last edited by jelle737; Jul 22, 2017 at 07:10 AM.


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