MFD Nimbus 1800mm Twin Tractor FPV Aircraft - full review / owner's thread - RC Groups
Shop our Airplanes Products Drone Products Sales
Thread Tools
Apr 19, 2017, 06:57 AM
Registered User
Arxangel's Avatar
New Product

MFD Nimbus 1800mm Twin Tractor FPV Aircraft - full review / owner's thread


Hey guys, this is my review of the new MFD Nimbus Twin Tractor FPV plane I got from Banggood. I would have published sooner but bad weather and DHL delivery delays of some parts prevented me from doing so!

You can also find the review as well as a full parts list in my blog: ArxangelRC.blogspot.com

I have never owned a MyTwinDream plane, but I've heard and read enough to know its really good! When the MFD Nimbus was announced a lot of people expressed their concernes whether this new plane could live up to the expectations, because the MTD did raise the bar pretty high! When the plane was released though... it turned out that there will be a few modifications of it, and this is where it got weird - some people (like me) got what they were expecting, while others were looking for a more mapping oriented platform, as in the promotional video, but got the FPV version instead... and hence were less than satisfied with what it had to offer, but disregarded... or were not aware of the fact that a mapping version will be released later on.

I don't really do any mapping, so that version would serve little purpose to me, and I assume the price will be higher than the FPV version as well, so I am pretty happy with what I got. There are some things yet to be desired, but I have to say the plane shows quaity parts, design, convenience, and ease of assembly and disassembly, and I have a feeling it just may live up to its roots at some point. True, you will probably not be able to load it up with tons of batteries for a 300km round trip, but it seems to me this one was designed with something else in mind entirely - it was not meant to break any new records (the MTD already set the bar high enough), but rather it is meant to do specific tasks, be easy to deploy, and easy to transport, while still providing more than adequate flight times and has outstanding flight characteristics!



MFD Nimbus - full review and maiden (13 min 43 sec)


SPECIFICATIONS
Wing span: 1800mm
Wing area: 37.5dm2
Length: 1300mm
Flying weight: no official AUW announced (around 3800 grams for the current configuration)
CG: 10cm from nose as per the User Manual


ARRIVAL STATE

OK... no good news for Banggood here... again! As with the X-UAV Clouds, the Nimbus arrived in a pretty battered up box as well... but luckily... there was no damage on the plane, save for a few dents and dings! I am starting to worry that my luck will run out with a third plane... and in addition to the box, the plane will be completely smashed! I just hope it will not happen to the Finwing Traveler plane I am planning on getting as soon as it is released, as I really love the idea of a small size twin tractor model that can be packed down so neatly, and would absolutely hate to receive it severely damaged!











Inside the box everything was packed neatly and most parts had bubble wrap as well.



Banggood, PLEASE, pay more attention to the packaging of these planes... PLEASE!!!


WHAT I LIKE


OK, so... quite a few things to mention here to be honest... probably a lot more than some people might expect... but as we all should know, it all depends on the point of view!

The first surprise when I opened the box was... the Nimbus actually comes about 95% pre-assembled and glued!!!



And more than that... with a few very minor exceptions the plastic parts were very precisely and accurately glued on, the tail boom was installed into the fuselage, and the servos were also installed, and everything fit perfectly when I assembled the parts.









The tail boom is actually larger than on the Skywalker EVE-2000 and is so well mounted to the fuselage that no matter what I did, I was not able to move it even 1mm, or bend it in any way!







And check this out - the tail fins have carbon spars in them, which makes them very rigid and definitely improves the overall stability of the tail. When the tail is assembled it all feels very tight and solid, and does no wobble like the fins on the Clouds did before I reinforced them. I particularly like this, because I will not have to reinforce the tail and can use it as is!



By the looks of it, the carbon spars have actually been in the injection mould, so in effect they are integrated into the foam.



The servos actually also come pre-installed in the wings and even wired to the wing connector, and with the push rod pre-installed. The motor mounts do look interesting and at first, and due to the lack of a manual, it took me a few seconds to figure out how those should be mounted!









Those wing tip protectors are great for when landing on hard surfaces as they will keep the wing tips from getting scratched while dragging on the ground.





The motor mount section is actually screwed through the foam to a piece on top of the wing. This makes the whole mount so much more rigid and secure, but allows for it to be disassembled in case this is necessary.





And the next thing that was a nice surprise were the locks for the different parts - they look small, but once they snap in securely there is no prying them apart other than tearing the foam, or using the little levers to unlock them, and the fit and alignment of all locks is spot on! Not to mention the added bonus of the easiest and quickest assembly ever of a plane of this size and weight!!

Also, these integrated connectors save so much time and effort in plugging and unplugging cables. Honestly, if the X-UAV Clouds had those on the wings it would be just a step away from being the most perfect plane out there!



The tail is actually the only thing that needs to be glued on to complete the plane... hence why I said it comes 95% pre-assembled!





The tail comes in 3 pieces, and it is actually not that difficult to glue them on, depending on the glue you will be using, as none is provided with the plane! A cable to connect the tail to the front of the plane is also provided, and it does have extension locks on it for added safety!



There are also 3 mounting posts - two on the tail and one on the fuselage, that allow the installation of gear to the fuselage without the need to glue stuff on, or to use velcro on the foam.





I also particularly like the GPS bed, which is forward of the main hatch. It provides a convenient location to put the GPS unit, while also taking it away from the electronics, and not putting any additional drag outside of the fuselage. Only drawback is that you can't mount a GSP unit with the big round plastic casing, you will have to remove that.



And finally we get to the front of the plane. On the inside there is a dual layer plywood structure mounted to the bottom of the fuselage that is supposed to hold the battery! This is one of the big differences between the FPV and the MAPPING versions of this plane - the FPV version has it here, while the MAPPING version has a custom battery under the main hatch, so this area is free of the plywood structure to allow the installation of a mapping camera. I guess if I wanted to I could remove it, but at this time it does provide a convenient way to mount and hold the battery in place, so I would keep it for now.



The connectors for the nose are actually on top of the adapter here, and to be honest are not that difficult to access and plug stuff into. This makes putting on and removing the nose so much easier and hassle free, since you don't have to deal with any hanging wires and connectors. You can actually wire quite a lot of stuff to the nose of the plane, this is very convenient.



That connector is met with a corresponding one on the nose itself, and I was very pleasantly surprised at how well all of this fits together and how securely it is held in place!





The nose comes with a plywood plate that should be glued in the designated spot, and once removed from the plane everything on the inside can be easily accessed. Right at the nose there is a small plastic piece, which allows for the convenient installation of an airpseed sensor.





This plate would provide a solid mounting point for a gimbal or a pan/tilt mount.





Continues in next post...
Sign up now
to remove ads between posts
Apr 19, 2017, 06:59 AM
Registered User
Arxangel's Avatar
...continued from previous post!

Another great feature is the distribution board that comes even with the KIT version of the plane. It has a convenient place for the autopilot to be mounted, although it will not fir the reguar sized APM and Pixhawk controllers, so you should keep this in mind... get one of the smaller modifications, or just any AP with a smaller form factor. All of the wiring for the wings has actually been done in the factory, so there is nothing additional to do here.



It even has an industrial grade looking 12v 3A reguator on it.



And also a not so industrial looking 5v 3A regulator, which is mounted on the bottom of the board.



And finally we get to the power pack for the Nimbus. Since I ordered the KIT early on, I did not have a chance to get the PNP version, so I had to order the power pack from MFD directly, but if you get the PNP later on most of what you see below should arrive with the plane, only thing I am not certain of is the big plywood "Battery Adapter" plate, which actually makes mounting the battery pretty easy as it fits perfectly inside the fuselage, so when you tighten the velcro the battery has nowhere to go.

What actually comes with the plane is not the 40A FlyFun ESCs advertised on the Banggood website, but rather the much better (in my opinion) Platinum Pro version. The ESCs are 30A, which is more than enough for the 2814-510Kv motors, which are pretty efficient! There is also some bulky looking 5v regulator, a bunch of servo cables and a pair of CW/CCW 10x6E props.




WHAT I DON'T LIKE

Well... as usuall... there is content for this section as well! I wonder... will we ever see the day when a plane will not have a single line of text in this section other than to say that it is perfect!

So let me start with the biggest annoyance for me - the power distribution board! Initially it felt like the best thing ever - it combines everything you would need for a build like this and it saves you a ton of wiring... if it worked as intended! It has 12 and 5v regulators and all you need to do is solder some pins on, plug everything in and you are good to go! Sadly... that is not exactly how it went!

So... I did solder some pins on, but then they were kinda useless, because all of them go to a central bus bar or something, that is actually missing from the board, I think this was designed primarily for the MFD autopilot... and I suppose the RTF mapping version of the plane will have that soldered on... and will make life so much easier.

Also, while doing some wiring I managed to knock off one of the capacitors on the bottom of the board... so I had to use wires to solder it back on. Meanwhile, I soldered single pins to the place where the bus bar should be, so I can more easily connect everything to the AUAV-X2, and actually make use of the distribution bit of the board.





Then, when I had everything mounted and connected... and it looked so perfect and clean... because all that soldering did take some time... turns out the power lines on the board are actually not separated and the 12v and 5v lines are not filtered, and the video side is not shielded from the servo and ESC side!



So... this caused a lot of interference in the video and I had to think of something to solve that issue. So I soldered a separate power bar for the servos and added an external UBEC for the servos alone... turned out to be the cleanest solution I could think of!





But still... the ESCs kept causing interference, even though it was very little, it was still noticeable! That means that I will have to rewire the video system to move it out of the board... since the power cables for the ESC go through the board and it would be more difficult to move those. And that in turn means that this board is as close to useless as possible as in the end the only thing going through it will be the ESC power wires, and the servo signal wires... which I guess is still something! So... they might as well not have included this board with the FPV version... or actually I would have preferred if it had been made properly, so that everything connected to it would not interfere with each other!

Next I do need to mention that the tail servos are actually glued in the foam along with the plastic... so if you ever need to replace them... it will be a tricky job. This definitely could have been designed a bit better so you would have an option to open the plastic easily and replace them!



Another thing that bothers me very slightly is the way the tail control surfaces connect to the servo horns! Basically when you slide in the tail fins the servo horns fit into slots on the control surfaces and control them that way! I wonder how much stress this is putting on the servo and whether it is more than if you mount them the conventional way with a push rod, etc., but I do remember seeing similar designs on NATO drones, and even for the ailerons, not only the tail... so I guess if should be fine as long as those fins stay firmly attached to the tail.



It wouldn't be a proper "WHAT I DON'T LIKE" section if I don't mention the lack of proper hinges... which seems to be a common... issue... with most FPV planes coming out of China! And when I confront the manufacturers about this, the answer is always the same "It is too expensive to add hinges"!! REALLY... those hinges that literally take less than 1 cent to make will make a 300 USD frame too expensive??? And I am always shocked by this answer, because for instance FMS make scale planes... and most of these come with lots of scale details, come painted, pre-assembled... AND come with proper hinges and electronics... AND still they cost less than a bare, unassembled, unpainted FPV frame!?!? So what the hell is the deal here?? How come one manufacturer can do it... and another can't?! Anyway... I am talking to Charles about putting some proper hinges on this plane... it took me 3 years to get Volantex to do that on the Ranger EX... lets see how long it will take here!



One more very little issue that I found, was that one of the plastic bits on the tail was not 100% glued to the foam, so I had to add some glue to fix this, nothing serious... but I have to mention it.





One thing that I found missing in the KIT... is that equipment plate that is supposed to be mounted on the posts on the tail. In the manual you can clearly see that there should be a plate for the tail, but it is not in the FPV KIT version... possibly it will come with the mapping version.



Another minor thing to note is that when the wings are assembled, there is a very tiny gap between them and the fuselage. This does not happen with the tail fins. I think this is due to the fact that when gluing the wing adapters to the fuselage, the bottom parts of the adapters were not completely pressed in, so they are sticking out a little bit. I have not found that to have a negative effect on the flight of the plane, and once you get those locks to lock in place all of this feels very solid and doesn't move at all.



Even though the wing tips have been protected from damage when landing on hard surfaces, the bottom of the fuselage actually has no such protection, so I had to use some fibre tape to reinforce it a bit. Usually I would not complain about this, but the X-UAV Clouds really raised the bar here with its huge plastic piece covering and protecting most of the underside of the fuselage, so now I would actually like to see solutions like this in more models. Such a thing would have been very useful here and for both the mapping and FPV versions of the plane.



And last I have to mention the fact that there was no User Manual in the box with the plane. I had to contact MFD in order to get it... and it is not very detailed... and is in Chinese! Thankfully the plane is kinda intuitive to assemble, so I only needed it for the CG point, which thankfully is easy to see!


THE BUILD

Alright, lets get down to work!

Since the fuselage is almost fully assembled, the build time for this plane is actually pretty small!





The only thing left to do here is to glue on the tail pieces. Gluing all of them at once would have proven tricky, so I decided to do them one by one. First I glued on the bottom piece, and since the fit of the part is quite tight, I used the glue sparingly so as not to have too much coming out of the sides when I press the part on.



It would appear my glue was spot on in quantity, as none came out of the joints, and yet the part felt solid in there as if it was welded in place.



Next I glued on one of the top pieces.



Before I glued on the last piece, I made sure to connect the tail servo extension cable and wire it through the tail boom. Nice thing about that extension is that the connectors have extension locks on them for added security, so I did not need to add my own. I also made some custom length cables and wired them as well to the tail, so I can mount the receiver and possibly a camera there in the future.





Once all of the above was done I glued on the last tail piece. As always I am using my favourite Moment Classic glue, it softens the foam a bit while drying, but really welds the parts together when it dries up! I also printed a small stand to be screwed on the mount posts to hold the antenna stand and the radio receiver.





Turned out pretty good I'd say! I love that these mounts are here, so I don't have to wonder how to mount stuff and need to glue or velcro it to the foam.



Next I decided to tackle the nose section. Since gluing the plywood plate up front made it very solid, I decided it should be able to easily take the weight of a pan/tilt, so I dug one up that I had bought a long time ago.



I wasn't going to put a pilot camera on there, so I had to remove the bits and pieces on top in order to be able to mount the RunCam HD camera.



I drilled some holes in the plywood and used plastic bolts to mount the pan/tilt mount, and then used velcro to attach the camera to it.





I then took care of the wiring, taking full advantage of the provided quick connector.



So... now that those were done, it was time to take care of the wiring.



If you've read above you already know the PDB is no good to power everything at the same time, so when I soldered on the pins, I soldered the single connector cables to make wiring the motors and servos to the AUAV-X2 autopilot much easier.

But before that I soldered the power module on the input cables from the battery.



That found its way to the left side of the inside of the fuselage.



Then came the single pin cables. I did spend some time with the multimeter tracing these pads to make sure they come to the correct pins on the PDB.





And now it was time for the AP.



And adding the next round of gear to the mix. I have now also connected the servo leads, and since am going to be using a telemetry receiver I will use the FrSky FLVSS voltage sensor to get detailed readings on the battery cells. I have connected the telemetry unit at this time, but I will use this for setup and testing only, and will remove it for the flights.



And now... finally... everything is in and looks so tidy!



Continues in next post...
Apr 19, 2017, 06:59 AM
Registered User
Arxangel's Avatar
...continued from previous post!

The GPS board fits perfectly into the designated slot.



Next I setup and wired in the MinimOSD module.



Just over the AP in the photo you can see the video system wired in as well. Weird thing is... when I try to power everything from the 12v output (for this I use the RunCam 2 as it can accept 12v), the video doesn't work... when I power the camera from 5v and all else from 12v... all works very well! Not sure what that is about... but when I re-wire the video system to bypass the PDB at some point... I hope that will be solved!



And now with the PDB mounted back in, everything looked so nice... until I had to take all of it out again a few hundred times to test video system wiring, to redo the servo wiring, etc.! You know... all the things you have to do once you think you are pretty much done with the wiring! The second GPS module visible at the top is the dedicated one for the TeleFlyPro OSD module for the antenna tracker. The reason for this being that the Pixhawk programms the M8N GPS with settings that are incompatible with the tracker OSD!



On the inside I tried to route the cables around the top sides of the compartment to make as much room for the battery is possible. At the back on the right I let the buzzer hang loose... I can still hear it fine from the outside. On the left side is the TeleFlyOSD module, which sends the video signal to the Vtx on the outside, just behind the main hatch.



The OSD is mounted high enough not to obstruct the battery. Later on I also raised the GPS cable to get it out of the way. You can also see that the video power and signal cables, as well as those for the servo on the right are now connected to the main connector board for the nose. Like I said... makes puttin on and removing the nose part so much easier and quicker.



And now I made that new pin rail to be able to power the servos from a separate regulator.



I soldered the regulator's input cable to the battery cables directly! I just love HobbyWing stuff... it just works!



So now that everything was... almost working OK, it was time to sort out the Vtx. I made a small cut into the back of the main hatch to route the wire through.



I then printed out a stand for the Vtx, and used the provided mounting hole to screw it on.







I mounted the Vtx with 2 bolts to the stand. Since the Vtx has a heatsink on the inside at the back, but it is mounted to the case using only 2 screws, there are two remaining threaded holes, and I used them to mount the Vtx, but with slightly longer bolts.



I think it turned out pretty well!



Since now the main body of the plane was pretty much ready, I turned my attention to the wings and tail fins. First I put hinges on all control surfaces, and then I adjusted the pushrods a bit more presicely and put some zip ties on the clevises to prevent them from opening on their own.







Then I got to work on the motor mounts while I was waiting for the power pack to arrive from MFD. I soldered 3.5mm connectors to the ESC wires that were already routed on the wing.



So it turns out, those things that look like copter landing legs are actually the motor mounts! This is definitely a non-standard way to do this, but I have to say it is convenient if you need to revise it... unlike on the Skywalker EVE-2000 and X-UAV Clouds.



I was a bit sceptical about those clamps holding down the motor mount... but once I tightened the screws I was not able to even rotate it by hand, let alone pull it out!



When it came time for the ESCs, I did not use the ones from the power pack, but rather installed some HobbyWing XRotor 40A ESCs I had lying around after I dismantled my Y6 copter. The reason for this is because I may at some point install more powerful motors, and could use the larger ESCs anyway! I did shorten the cables on the ESC just to make it easier to fit it in the nacelle.



Next on goes the nacelle cover, which is held in place via 4 bolts to the clamps holding down the motor mount.



Funny thing is there were only 4 of these bolts with the plane, so I had to use my own bolts when I got to doing the other wing.



And so, with a little delay from DHL, the power pack finally arrived, and I got a hold of those nice motors.



Turns out I had to now disassemble the mounts in order to mount the motors, otherwise there is not enough space behind the mount to inser the hex wrench and tighten one of the bolts. Also... I had to use my own bolts to mount the motors to the mounts because no such bolts were provided with the plane or the power pack.



The motor's wires can be made a bit shorter here, but I've spent some much time soldering on this plane already that I will leave this for another time.



Once you put all the covers on, this actually looks pretty good, and it feels as if it will create a lot less drag than the nacelles on the EVE-2000!





And finally... we get to battery placement. I was absolutely not able to balance the plane with the 6S 6600mAh battery I use for the X-UAV Clouds as it is too light and there only so much it can go forward on this plane. I hope when I put a 3-axis gimbal up front I will be able to fly it with this one. I was able to balance the plane with the 6S 12000mAh pack I use for the EVE-2000, and it actually fits pretty well inside the fuselage... and it feels like there is more room in there... possibly a 6S 16000mAh pack might just fit in.

Using the battery plate I got with the MFD power pack makes inserting the battery very covenient - you velcro the battery to the plate, and slide the plate inside the fuselage while making sure to route the velcro strap over the battery. Then route the strap through the openings meant for it in the wooden plates and tighten the battery down. As the battery adapter plate fits very snugly in there, it will not move around, and the velcro strap will also hold it in place from sliding forward into the nose.



Even if the PNP version of the plane from Banggood does not come with this plate, this one should be quite easy to make.





With the battery all the way to the front of the adapter plate the plane was too nose heavy, so I moved it back to abour the 4cm mark, and CG was now perfectly neutral, so then after the first flight I moved the battery to the 3cm mark and flight performance was much better and the plane felt a lot more locked in while in the air.



Continues in next post...
Apr 19, 2017, 07:00 AM
Registered User
Arxangel's Avatar
...continued from previous post!

And at last... the plane is ready! Unlike the Clouds and EVE-2000, the build on this one actually took a lot less because it comes almost fully pre-assembled, while the other two had to be glued together... and that takes time with the glue I am using! The looks pretty well when assembled and like I've said before, it feels very solid and rigid when I handle it, which is actually good in my mind! This was definitely built to last... as long as you don't crash it nose first into the ground!

So, here is the Nimbus complete, I only have to mention that these photos are from the second day of flights and I have already removed the pan/tilt mount as it turned out to be complete crap (as you will see in the video, if you haven't already)! I also mounted on the RunCam 2 camera, because it can be powered from 12v directly and I am planning to do just that when I rewire the video system.







With that pointy nose the plane reminds me of some bird. Come to think of it... it does resemble a swallow slightly!






















THE VERDICT

Right... so... for the most part this plane is something of a feat of FPV engineering as it really goes a long way towards making FPV planes what they should be, but it does lag in some respects and still could use some more work. Despite that, I think this is a worthy model with lots of extras and conveniences that you don't get with other models, and it is definitely worth its money!

Ease of assembly alone is a great plus for me, and would be for a lot of people! There are no tools required and this plane can be assembled in less than a minute! This is quicker even than the XK A1200, and same goes for disassembly. On the other end of the spectrum you have the EVE-2000, which is a great plane but it is a pain in the A** to assemble, especially in the winter when the foam shrinks a little! I absolutelly cannot assemble this plane on my own at the flying field... I need at least 1 more person, if not 2 more, to help me assemble and disassemble the plane. Those carbon spars fit so tightly into the wings it makes for a very tough process and I will have to sand them down a little at some point... and even then the Nimbus will be easier and quicker to put together.

Another plus for me is the fact that you get a lot of the work on the assembly done for you, AND you also get the servos with the KIT version, all pre-installed and push rods connected. Yes, you do have to disconnect those and cut off the control surfaces in order to install proper hinges, but I do that on all planes now anyway... so nothing new there! My idea is that for the money you get a lot of worth... a lot of quality plastic and foam that has been 95% assembled, and some electronics even, and all of that for 250 USD with free shipping! In comparison the EVE-2000 costs 240 USD for the KIT version and comes with no electronics, and is cpompletely disassembled, and only gluing that took me over a week with the glue I am using! So it is not really a problem for me to put some hinges on when most of the other work has already been done for me, and has been done well!

Also, yes, space is limited inside the fuselage, compared to other models out there, but that would all depend on what you want to do with the plane. This particular version is for FPV... so I would say the space is actually pretty adequate. If you want to use this for mapping... wait for the mapping version to be released, rather than buy this and complain it will not work for you. Yes, the photos on the Banggood listing are misleading... but don't blame the model for this... blame the seller!!! From an FPV perspective this version has everything you need, except that you really can't make use of the crappy PDB, but that is easy to bypass anyway.

And when it comes to flight characteristics... I can't really complain at all! The plane can go slow, it can go fast, there is virtually no tip stall, especially if your CG is correct... it just parachutes down, and that is a HUGE plus for me! With the motors included in the PNP version of the plane it can be pretty efficient and on par with the Clouds and the EVE-2000! The servos, that are actually included with the KIT version, seem pretty good and very precise! Overall the plane just feels very solid in the air, and the frame looks very slink and clean once you take advantage of the provided conveniences for wiring and mounting gear.

So... is this plane perfect - NO! But is it still worth the money - in my opinion it is a big YES, and certainly much more than a lot of other planes out there! The lack of proper hinges and the crappy PDB are a non-issue for me because you don't get that with the competition either, but you do get a lot more worth for your money in other aspects of the model! The Nimbus probably will not break world records and will not be at the top of the longest duration, longest range, etc., etc., list... but it does set new standards of how FPV planes should be designed, parts and foam are of high quality, it is well build and super easy to assemble, and the flight and stall performance is amongst best in its class, which is the perfect recipie for specific tasks, but will never be THE ONE BEST all around plane that some people seem to be looking for... and as far as I am concerned... that is certainly not what it is trying to be. The Nimbus will perform well when you specialize it to a specific task, and that is good enough for me!
Apr 19, 2017, 07:01 AM
Registered User
Arxangel's Avatar
Reserved!
Apr 19, 2017, 07:03 AM
Registered User
Arxangel's Avatar
Reserved...
Apr 19, 2017, 07:42 AM
ARACE UAS
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arxangel
.....With the motors included in the PNP version of the plane it can be pretty efficient and on par with the Clouds and the EVE-2000!....
Thanks for the trough review.
....

Any with that in mind, and based on your pictures and previous review. You own the Skywalker EVE. I see you also have the clouds.

When you say they are on par in efficiency, what do you mean? Can you provide some solid stats, like OSD cruise amp, these are usually mission from your reviews and I think they are more solid, than just what you feel.

Also, maybe I just missed it, but can you tell us the UAW with everything installed except for the battery?

Thank you.
Last edited by Pompecukor; Apr 19, 2017 at 08:19 AM.
Apr 19, 2017, 07:50 AM
ARACE UAS
Ohh, I see you added some PIP OSD towards the end of the video.

Not sure of your layout. I am correct that you were almost always over 11 on level flight in auto mode, till you started to come in for landing? Only time it went below that is at zero Throttle. Data on the left column, mid, called CA?
Maybe I am looking at the wrong figure. Its hard for me to make out.
11A+ would be terrible on 6S, just like Skywalker Eve.
Clouds should be much better that that from what I heard, what are you getting with the clouds?.
Its definitely twice as bad as you would get with an MTD on 6S. (5-6A).
Last edited by Pompecukor; Apr 19, 2017 at 08:04 AM.
Apr 19, 2017, 08:03 AM
Registered User
Arxangel's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pompecukor
There is no Skywalker EVE2000
Right... then what is this: http://www.banggood.com/Skywalker-EV...l?rmmds=search
And why is it called EVE-2000 then??

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pompecukor
Any with that in mind, and based on your pictures and previous review. You own the Skywalker EVE. I see you also have the clouds.

When you say they are on par in efficiency, what do you mean? Can you provide some solid stats, like OSD cruise amp, these are usually mission from your reviews and I think they are more solid, than just what you feel.
Actually that estimation is not based on feel. During the first day of flying the EVE, it managed 90kms in 90min on around 10amps from the same 6S 12A battery.

The Nimbus, and I also do talk about that in the video, was able to do around 100 mins of flight time and cover 85kms with the same 10amps from the same 6S 12A batetry - so... a bit slower than the EVE, but a bit more efficient since it was able to fly 10 mins more! May be if it flies fast enough to do 90kms in 90 mins... it would be pretty close to the EVE. As for the Clouds, I fly that one with a 6S 6.6A battery, and on average am able to do around 50 mins for about 5A or little above... so a quick calculation shows its about half the consumption and half the flight time of the EVE and the Nimbus, and the Clouds is actually lighter... possibly the Nimbus with the lighter battery could do a bit better, because its motors do appear to be more efficient than the ones used in the EVE and the Clouds - 510Kv vs 580Kv (Clouds) and 640Kv (EVE-2000), and it was flying with slower props - 10x6 for the Nimbus vs 10x7 for the Clouds and the EVE.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Pompecukor
Also, maybe I just missed it, but can you tell us the UAW with everything installed except for the battery?

Thank you.
AUW is right at the top of the thread under the video, right now it is around 3800 grams, and the 6S 12A battery is exactly 1512 grams, so plane without a battery comes out to about 2300 grams.
Apr 19, 2017, 08:05 AM
Registered User
Arxangel's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pompecukor
Ohh, I see you added some PIP OSD towards the end of the video.

Not sure of your layout. I am correct that you were averaging 10A on level flight in auto mode, till you started to come in for landing? Data on the left column, mid, called CA?
Maybe I am looking at the wrong figure. Its hard for me to make out.
10A would be terrible on 6S, just like Skywalker Eve.
Clouds should be much better that that from what I heard, what are you getting with the clouds?.
I have some issues with the power modules in the Clouds and the EVE... so they are not really accurately reporting amp draw. The one in the Nimbus is working correctly, but I forgot to calibrate the current on it... so it is not showing a valid value!

Will do that before next flights so I can see what its averaging in flight, but based on the test I did last week I would say on average it was around 6A in level flight.
Apr 19, 2017, 08:10 AM
ARACE UAS
My bad about the nameming. Sorry.

Thanks for the info on the sensor calibration.

You have some of the most detailed reviews BTW. I admire your patience.

About the Nimbus, we jad exactly the same problem with the wings not clipping in all the way. As if the plugs were not flush and checked before gluing.
Anyway I sold it. So all that is behind me now.

I think that you missed a peculiar point in your review...

Due to the design, then is no way to plug the battery after the camera ia connectet. That is when you power up. The nose will always be off. At least as far as the mains are concerned. For the rest (5/12v) you can always put a switch somewhere.
Last edited by Pompecukor; Apr 19, 2017 at 08:17 AM.
Apr 19, 2017, 11:24 AM
Registered User
Arxangel's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pompecukor
My bad about the nameming. Sorry.

Thanks for the info on the sensor calibration.

You have some of the most detailed reviews BTW. I admire your patience.

About the Nimbus, we jad exactly the same problem with the wings not clipping in all the way. As if the plugs were not flush and checked before gluing.
Anyway I sold it. So all that is behind me now.

I think that you missed a peculiar point in your review...

Due to the design, then is no way to plug the battery after the camera ia connectet. That is when you power up. The nose will always be off. At least as far as the mains are concerned. For the rest (5/12v) you can always put a switch somewhere.
Thanks... don't know about patience... although my wife can vouch for it... but I do love doing this... and if its worth doing it... its worth overdoing it!

As for the nose... never really considered it as a drawback to be honest... I don't really need the camera to be powered up when I plug in the battery... and its one less thing to suck power out of it before take off!
Apr 19, 2017, 04:26 PM
Breaker of things...
Thanks for a great review....
I will be saving my pennies for one when I can.... :-)
Apr 19, 2017, 04:27 PM
Registered User
Arxangel's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Killer55
Thanks for a great review....
I will be saving my pennies for one when I can.... :-)
Glad I can help!
Apr 19, 2017, 07:47 PM
Hobbyzone.Au's Avatar
That's one serious review! Very well done! Did u find flying it in manual mode that it will dip it's nose when full throttle? Especially on hand launch WOT? Thrust angle? We had to pack the motor mounting alloy tube from the back to give the motor few degree of up pitch. Like unmentioned the ease of transport and assembly is what we and our clients love. Yes a few things were missing and wrong screws were used in various parts but overall it's a well made plane to do a specific task.

Those who might have gotten one now, pls check the motor mounting screws and hat they used to bolt the motor to plastic. In our batch they used counter sunk screw, which when tighten will cause the hole in the plastic to open and split/crack. Make sure u replace. Them with a flat pan head.

Also they now have a new battery tray, which I will post a pic later. It's basically the same size play tray that's installed. You then add velcro to this tray. Eg... Battery gets stuck on by velcro to this removable ply tray which u insert into the plane and the strap included will hold everything in place.

We have flown with 6s 14,000mah and have done a mock test for weight and size for a 6s 21,000 mah which fits with weight and cog spot on.

Sent from my A0001 using Tapatalk
Last edited by Hobbyzone.Au; Apr 20, 2017 at 10:37 AM.


Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Category Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
New Product XK A1200 1080p RTF FPV Plane - full review / owners' thread (w/ autopilot) Arxangel FPV Aircraft 316 Today 05:50 PM
New Product Hubsan H301S Spy Hawk RTF FPV - full review / owner's thread! Arxangel FPV Aircraft 1288 Today 11:45 AM
Build Log X-UAV Clouds Twin-tractor 1880mm FPV plane - full review / build log / mods Arxangel FPV Aircraft 413 Nov 20, 2017 01:36 PM
New Product MyFlyDream MFD Nimbus 1800mm Wingspan FPV Aircraft BG Tobey FPV Aircraft 151 Nov 12, 2017 08:04 PM
New Product Skywalker EVE-2000 2240mm Wingspan FPV plane - full review / build / owners' thread Arxangel FPV Aircraft 125 Jul 24, 2017 04:51 AM