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Apr 10, 2017, 07:08 PM
A Day @ a Time - Matt. 6:25-34
ruff1's Avatar
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Question

Who Will Produce the First 3D-Printed Airliner?


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Apr 11, 2017, 12:23 AM
Designer at Heavymetalrc.com
Scalejet757's Avatar
I'm well equipped to do so. But would need to free up time from these projects. Plus I'd want to use a bigger 3d printer so I could make the "big one"..
Last edited by Scalejet757; Apr 11, 2017 at 12:41 AM.
Apr 11, 2017, 05:10 AM
A Day @ a Time - Matt. 6:25-34
ruff1's Avatar
Thread OP
Nice. Looking forward to seeing this come about. How large of pieces can you print with your current setup?

One thing I noticed on some of the planes available is they all tend to have higher wing loading. I didn't include enough wing area on my Martin 4-0-4 when I drew up the plans and ended up having to extend the wing area by about 18%.

Even though functional flaps help with takeoff and landing it would be good to increase wing area so slower speeds can be flown without them. I myself don't like flying things "on the edge"; my flying skills are not all that good and while I will get better it will only be so much. Increasing the wing area is a balance between having enough and not having the model look way out of scale.

Maybe a bucket list item when I retire may be to learn CAD and draw up an airplane. Right now I don't have any interest or time.
Apr 11, 2017, 08:13 AM
Registered User
Dirty Dee's Avatar
I have a Prusa i3 MK2S 3D printer on order (7 weeks lead time) and I plan on attempting an airliner down the road. Going to start small and easy and do a BD-5J and and possibly an OV-10 to learn mimicking 3Dlabprints design methods before I move to an airliner.

3d printed planes seem to be typically a higher wing loading, but I wonder if the weight can be reduced by building some of the internal fuselage structure conventionally and replacing the control surfaces with balsa sanded to shape.
Apr 11, 2017, 10:23 AM
Designer at Heavymetalrc.com
Scalejet757's Avatar
That is the perfect 3d printer to use for something like this. I've mostly used "up" printers. They're reliable, but smaller print volume.
I was thinking the same thing, maybe do some parts from balsa/foam/carbon.. help it out on the weight a little. Plastic gets heavy FAST. Very cool though. We should do this soon on this forum! I can help by sharing cad files. I can draw anything to scale.

Now I'm getting pretty blissed-out over the thought of a big 3d printed heavy. Thanks a lot
Apr 11, 2017, 06:06 PM
A Day @ a Time - Matt. 6:25-34
ruff1's Avatar
Thread OP
Yep, will be watching. My recommendation is to cheat on the wing area and make it a bit larger than scale, enough to help but not so much that it detracts from the appearance. Definitely a balancing act.
In my research on this it appears when you scale down below 80 inches the wing area reduction percentage needs to be less.
How much is needed? I don't have the experience of others so those of you in the know give us your feedback.
Apr 11, 2017, 06:11 PM
A Day @ a Time - Matt. 6:25-34
ruff1's Avatar
Thread OP
I hope to have a look at the 3DLabPrint P-51, a flying buddy is printing that model right now. I wonder what their criteria is for structural design? It will be interesting to see just how much plastic there is under the covers. I'm sure they have optimized the use of material for weight savings.
Apr 11, 2017, 06:36 PM
Designer at Heavymetalrc.com
Scalejet757's Avatar
Sounds good to me! I have a lot of experience printing thin wall structures. The 319 has some. The exhaust and edf tubes are printed thin walls. I believe that a light honey comb structure is perfect for something like an airliner. The question is, where do we draw the line- What if it DOES have structure that is foam or balsa integrated? Does it lose the "cool" factor that we are after in a 3d printed model? My airliners are rooted to 3d printing in every way, but they are not 3d printed models. (the hardware and landing gear blah blah blah.. ARE 3d printed) But where should the line be drawn in the definition "3d printed airliner". What if you could keep the wings more scale by making them from different materials? BTW to answer your question from before- I can print within a 120mm x 120mm x 140mm volume. So I can still whip up a pretty decently sized jet. But I picture how awesome this would be with 2 or 3 Mk2's to use for speeding up the process.

Getting excited.

Which airliner do you guys think would be a good subject for a file download?
Apr 12, 2017, 06:08 AM
A Day @ a Time - Matt. 6:25-34
ruff1's Avatar
Thread OP
Why not an Embraer 190 or a variant? Maybe something to scale for a 30 mm edf? I don't know right off what that would be size-wise, but if drawn up in CAD, could you not apply a scaling factor and size up automatically once it is drawn up?

Regarding construction and materials, who cares? A hybrid approach to construction to save weight is already in use here!
Apr 12, 2017, 01:10 PM
Designer at Heavymetalrc.com
Scalejet757's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by ruff1
Why not an Embraer 190 or a variant? Maybe something to scale for a 30 mm edf? I don't know right off what that would be size-wise, but if drawn up in CAD, could you not apply a scaling factor and size up automatically once it is drawn up?

Regarding construction and materials, who cares? A hybrid approach to construction to save weight is already in use here!

I worked with emb 190's at JB for 9 yrs. I LOVE that plane. Mechanics didn't much like it. But I always loved flying on them. Smooth, quiet, and pretty sleek lookin. I was kinda gettin an itch for an md-80/717.. or 757 myself. And this could be a nice opportunity to finally do a really nice 747. I dunno. there's so many! 727? haha

Yes, that's the magic of cad. If you can design the aircraft starting off smaller and make it work, then it leaves you gobs of room to find the sweet spot as far as size goes. And it only improves in every way as it gets bigger. Performance, weight to size etc. Literally about a 2 min process to size it up to a different scale. The only issue, is just tolerances.. for foam, balsa, or plastic locking interfaces. You just have to re adjust those parts. But for a 3d printed airframe, that problem goes away for the most part i think!? If I draw up a model, I think I'd like to start off a little bigger than I've been making models. Maybe try a 35-40mm? Those suckers can put out a TON of thrust now.

I like the idea of some nice light wings made from other materials maybe 3d print some components.

fun
Apr 12, 2017, 08:17 PM
EDF rules... :)
AirX's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scalejet757
Now I'm getting pretty blissed-out over the thought of a big 3d printed heavy. Thanks a lot
That would be the ultimate scale model.
Able to print the aircraft fuselage/flying surfaces/gear etc.
My buddy at work is also into 3D printing as a part of the hobby, he is just getting started in 3D printing.
He did mention a new plastic advertised with a greater shear strength of ~8000psi on another 3D printer thread.
So materials are advancing for the hobbyist.

I will try and find a link so you guys can evaluate it.

Eric B.

Saw the mention here:
https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...5&postcount=54

Looked up the materials here:
https://3dprint.com/52288/taulman-3d-alloy-910/

Another material to look at is this - printed clear glass:
http://taulman3d.com/t-glase-optics.html
Last edited by AirX; Apr 12, 2017 at 09:13 PM. Reason: add information
Apr 12, 2017, 11:23 PM
Designer at Heavymetalrc.com
Scalejet757's Avatar
Thanks Eric, wow I've got some taulman filament laying right here, but I didn't know they came out with that glassier stuff. Super impressive. Will have to try it out this week. It's true, now that 3d printing is getting easier, filaments are becoming pretty awesome
Apr 13, 2017, 03:38 PM
EDF rules... :)
AirX's Avatar
Your welcome.

Jim, my buddy, have thought about using the clear glass filament to make canopies since I still work in the old ways of foam and fiberglass.

Cheers,
Eric B.
Apr 25, 2017, 06:15 AM
Registered User
Does it count? actualy I dont plan to print the whole aircraft because I believe that is better to cut some parts from foam.
But nose section, gear bays, engine nacelles and tail section will be rpinted
Monty CZ
Apr 25, 2017, 05:17 PM
A Day @ a Time - Matt. 6:25-34
ruff1's Avatar
Thread OP
Great idea! The compound curves and shapes are ideal candidates for 3D printing. I can see how this will help speed up the build process. I have done a lot of foam carving on my Martin 4-0-4.


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