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Apr 12, 2017, 03:41 PM
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Dirk25's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark dicks
glad to see a windstar still out there, it was based on my fathers Metrick Magick design but altered by Robbe

I think Brad put a new fin and rudder on his one

Mark
Hi Mark,

I'm glad you like it. I thought I'd do it up to preserve it and make it into something that is very usable not a toy that robbe created.

I do believe that your fathers Metrick Magick was very competitive and the pictures that I've seen of them look great. I don't think this windstar will ever get to that standard without a lot of work but it's abit of fun and I'm just wanting to make it good enough to keep up or just not keep up with the local club.

I have found a few pictures of brads boat and you are correct he did put a new keel and rudder in. I'm not going to that extent although I probably should if I want it competitive.

Cheers
Dirk.
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Apr 16, 2017, 03:39 AM
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Dirk25's Avatar
Had a little bit of time to do abit more on the windstar today.
Made a mould for a new nose cone and sanded down the original keel and added a layer of fiberglass to it to stiffen it up.
Need to do the other side and then it should be okay.

I have also made a hard decision not to go away because we have so much work.
That also means that I wont have time to work on the Windstar.

I have found a IOM on ebay and have purchased that for $500 to get me out on the water so I can still have fun and not worry about quickly finishing my other yachts.

The new boat has a rmg winch and hitech servo. Its an old design but it looks the part.

The only thing is the owner doesn't know what it is and neither do I.

I'm guessing its either a Rage (Jeff Byerley - Mirage Radio Yachts) or a KF II (Hugh Kidd/Paul Davis - Canadian)

Does anyone have any idea of what it is?
Apr 16, 2017, 05:20 AM
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SailingJunkie's Avatar
Not a Rage. Here is a link to what a Rage looks like.

https://m.facebook.com/pg/NewEngland...68201129927324
Apr 16, 2017, 05:31 AM
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SailingJunkie's Avatar
Possibly an ICE
Apr 16, 2017, 06:36 AM
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coolmobility's Avatar
Looks like a Rage to me. Ice has a more flat sided, higher front deck.

Saw it on ebay, good value pickup for a starter boat - have fun with that. Worth $500 in just parts, with two rigs and A & B sails.

Certificate should have design details anyway.
Apr 16, 2017, 06:42 AM
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Dirk25's Avatar
Was so excited I asked the guy if I could pick it up tonight @8pm. He said sure. Off I went!!!

Got it home rigged it up and straight in the pool for a test run with no wind at all. I had to blow

Very excited for Tuesday afternoon now

It's got papers. When I go back inside I'll post up a proper picture and what they call it.
Apr 16, 2017, 07:11 AM
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Dirk25's Avatar
So the papers say its a Shearwater by Lou Vandenburg
It was registered in June 2011

The boat was originally green but is a pearl metallic which is really badly done.
I'm not going to touch this boat as this will be my racer until the Windstar and then the Race Ready II are finished which may be a long while off now by the looks of it.

Will try and take some pictures or maybe a video if I can manage it on Tuesday arvo.

Does anyone know anything about the boat design and how it should be rigged in certain conditions?
Otherwise I'm just going to have to play around with it a lot. Lucky I live very close to an awesome waterway.

Cheers
Dirk.
Apr 18, 2017, 11:31 PM
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Dirk25's Avatar
To all the guys and girls that are following me through my builds and have helped thank you.

I need some advice and/ or to be pointed in the right direction with setting up an IOM.
I've watched YouTube videos and read heaps of info about setting up the rigs and tuning but I learn more from doing it and seeing what happens or learn from watching someone.

I set up my new IOM yesterday (Tuesday arvo club race day) and it was not even close to being good.
Scott kindly had a play with it and in about 10seconds he had it rigged as good as his own boat.

I was following what he was doing and set it up again when I got home and I couldn't seem to get the same tune as he did. Is there a faster way to learn this as it will take me a long time if I only do it every Tuesday arvo.

Or

Is there a book or something that I can get that goes through the basics?

And
Is there a way that you guys test if it's sailing better or worse once you've adjusted something if your not racing against anyone?
It was helpful having the other boats as a pace to judge how well I was doing.

First race I was in I was half a lap behind as I had expected. During the 2min rest Scott adjusted the rig and the next 2 races I can 2nd and then a 3rd then The next 2 I kept hitting the back buoy and had to do a penalty which put me at 2nd last and last.

Have a video and a few pics. Will post them when I get home from work.
Apr 19, 2017, 03:31 AM
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Dirk25's Avatar
Nothing like playing around with the rigging after work when it's raining outside
Apr 19, 2017, 10:09 AM
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hiljoball's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirk25
I need some advice and/ or to be pointed in the right direction with setting up an IOM.
I've watched YouTube videos and read heaps of info about setting up the rigs and tuning but I learn more from doing it and seeing what happens or learn from watching someone.

I set up my new IOM yesterday (Tuesday arvo club race day) and it was not even close to being good.
Scott kindly had a play with it and in about 10seconds he had it rigged as good as his own boat.

I was following what he was doing and set it up again when I got home and I couldn't seem to get the same tune as he did. Is there a faster way to learn this as it will take me a long time if I only do it every Tuesday arvo.
Here is the process that I use.

Quick guide to sail trim for normal wind and flat water

This is a starting point.

The challenge with the IOM rig is that adjusting one item may affect several others. For example tightening the back stay to flatten the main will also add more twist to the leach. So the trick to set up the boat quickly is to isolate each adjustment to minimize its effect on others. To do this the sequence is important.

Prep
Install rig with ram off, vang eased.

Sail Trim (in this order)

Mast Setup
Slowly bring sails to close hauled check for jams or sheets too tight.
Tension back stay so that mast is straight. (lay boat on side and sight down mast)
Light tension on jackline down haul.
Tension main downhaul just to take out wrinkles.

Downwind Trim
Let out sheets to max.
Main boom should hit shrouds and jib boom about 85 degrees
Trim boom vang for downwind. Upper Main sail leach should not twist forward.
Gybe main and check leach on both sides if one is more twisted forward then mast tip not centered.

Upwind Trim
Pull in sheets to close hauled.
Jib Topping lift (about 40mm) to set twist
Add mast ram for main sail twist. (match curve to jib)
Check fullness of sail foot (25 to 30 mm for jib and 25 mm for main)
Check main sheet for 10 mm from sheeting post (range is 8 to 15 mm depending on conditions)
Check jib clew for 65 mm to mast. ( 60 with more twist for very light, 70 for top of range and waves)

At launching
Check rudder and sails before releasing boat. Hatch and drain plug in place.

Sail close hauled and check for same behavior on both tacks, if different check rudder and mast for on centre .

If both tacks same
Weather helm? Move mast tip forward or increase twist in main by easing mast ram.
Lee helm, move mast tip aft or reduce twist by adding mast ram.

After Sailing
Ease downhaul, jackline, ram, vang while noting settings for next time.

John
Apr 19, 2017, 11:02 AM
Will fly for food
davidjensen's Avatar
Unfortunately there is no fast way to learn all the intricacies of the IOM rig. Just having your side stays to tight or to loose can mess with every other setting. Each time you go out and sail you will learn a lot. Take some time to look at the other boats, take pictures of the other boats rigging so you can look at it later when you make changes to your rigs. Feel the tension the other boats have on their side stays and how they tension their rigs. Sail shape can be difficult to obtain and sometimes it just eludes you. Mast prebend, the cut of the mainsail luff, the vang setting, back stay tension and how the mast ram effects all of these needs to be understood. It will take a while. The link below has a lot of pics of many boats and how they are rigged

http://www.ibextrax.com/
Apr 19, 2017, 02:54 PM
Steve Landeau IOM USA 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirk25
Nothing like playing around with the rigging after work when it's raining outside
Lay the boat down flat enough to get good pic of the sail shape from top to bottom. Also, another good look is with the boat angle you have there, but looking straight into the slot from astern (so we can see the twist in both sails together). Far enough back to see all of it.

It's hard to tell with that pic, but it seems like there's a bad spot in the main where the headstay attaches. Initially, I'd say more backstay, but once you do that, you need to do more.

Johns procedure is spot on and in order. Contrary to most assumptions, the vang is not for adjusting twist in the close-hauled position, the ram does this.
Set the mainsail twist on the running position first, then sheet in and set the ram to your desired twist. Most often, your mast will look real good afterwards. A "slight" reverse bend is ok down low, so long as the twist is where you want it.

I suggest erring to the loose side, and working your way in. Too loose generally means you'll be somewhat fast, but not high. Keep coming in and reducing twist until your satisfied with both height and speed. Different designs will have different VMG. You may sail a couple degrees lower, but if your'e faster and it's enough to be even after 2 tacks, then you've met "your" boat's potential.

This is best done with one other boat in a training session, NOT a race!

David points out an important note with the relation to the mast bend and the luff cut.
It's critical that the sailmaker is fully aware of the mast you're using (and that he knows what to do with the info!).

But rake is dependent on the yacht design, and some of them are trickier than others. Only your local experts and the designer can help you there.

I'll get some nay-sayers on this one, but I used to suggest the Easton 12.4mm mast for those new to the class (not sure they're even available anymore). Tweaking these skinny noodle rigs is an art within itself, and the new guy just wants to go out and sail with the pack. The 12.4 is super easy to manage, no prebend (ANYTHING under 12mm will require it), set the mast to the sail and go get the fingers worked out on the course. It will take a LONG time before you're losing a boatlength here and there due to the extra windage of 2.4mm. Remember, you've already got the whole rig... carrying the extra 2.4 for much easier tuning ability far outweighs the difference at this stage of the game. And they were only $15, so once you got to the point of putting blame on the rig, it was a low cost upgrade.... food for thought.
Apr 21, 2017, 04:19 PM
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Dirk25's Avatar
Unreal, thank you all. I found a good article as well at http://www.dellquaysc.co.uk/images/M...ailSetting.pdf

With all the info I have now I should be able to set it up successfully.

Dirk.


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