Aileron-Rudder mix...yes or no? - RC Groups
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Mar 10, 2017, 02:04 PM
CA...gimme the CA...
whowhatwhere's Avatar
Question

Aileron-Rudder mix...yes or no?


I use an aileron/rudder mix on all my high wingers, but I've never used it on low wingers such as my GP Lancair or Millennium Master. I was wondering whether or not it's recommended on low wing warbirds, such as my GWS Corsair or my new Eleven Hobby T-28.

Anyone using an A/R mix on their warbirds? Discussion?

Thanks in advance,
Ric
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Mar 10, 2017, 05:17 PM
DFS#000178
Rampage's Avatar
I use a little bit--like 5%--on my LX Wildcat, but that's the only warbird I've got that doesn't like to be bank-and-yanked. I also used a bit on my EFlite P-38 when I was still flying her.
Mar 10, 2017, 06:20 PM
Arrowhead
Totally personal choice.

I think I experimented with it a few years back when I first started flying, but no longer bother.
Mar 10, 2017, 07:05 PM
Registered User
Never. Use the T-28 as a learning tool to become proficient coordinating turns and flying the rudder yourself, and you'll be better than 90% of rc pilots.
Mar 10, 2017, 08:56 PM
Pro Semi Driver
Johnnysplits's Avatar
I think the only mix you need is vodka and 7up!!
Mar 10, 2017, 09:34 PM
Old's Cool
I'm an old flight instructor and shun these kinds of mixes. They are just a crutch that prevents you from learning to use the controls properly. Most often, they are not even a very good crutch.

For example, an aileron/rudder mix will only be right at one particular airspeed and orientation. At a higher airspeed it will be too much rudder. At a lower airspeed it won't be enough. Inverted it will be backwards. Its a poor compromise from the outset.

Watch the airplane and learn to use the control inputs that make it do what you want it to do. Get yourself a foam 3D plane - great leaning tool even if are aren't totally into 3D.

Johnny splits, I hope you are not talking about good vodka.
Mar 11, 2017, 09:49 AM
Warbird Enthusiast
LICobra's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clingman
Never. Use the T-28 as a learning tool to become proficient coordinating turns and flying the rudder yourself, and you'll be better than 90% of rc pilots.
I agree ....+1
Mar 11, 2017, 10:42 AM
Don't forget to trim rudder!
turbinefancy's Avatar
Adverse yaw is more apparent on planes with long wings and under-cambered airfoils that fly slowly; typically gliders, WW I planes and bombers etc. You can see them dragging the tail low during a turn. Nothing wrong with lightening pilot work load by using aileron-rudder mix, or differential ailerons (more up than down ). The rolls will look much more axial with proper mix.

Above post regarding inverted flight is correct that mix will exacerbate the problem. Also having the mix does not preclude one from developing from good rudder use habits, such as using top rudder during rolls.

During my initial trimming flights, I always go through more steps than others (in listed order):
1. Carefully trim rudder by flying level directly away into wind (better if no wind), note yaw and trim it out.
2. Move CG to my liking by performing the full throttle 45 inverted climb test, if nose drop back to level faster than 3 seconds, move CG back (exception due to decalage or unde- camber).
3. Mix out any coupling for knife edge and check to see if excessive during flate turn (rudder only).

Very easy to impress others once you have the above dialed in.
Last edited by turbinefancy; Mar 11, 2017 at 11:18 AM.
Mar 11, 2017, 11:44 AM
CA...gimme the CA...
whowhatwhere's Avatar
Thanks all for the replies.

I fly my high wingers pretty much scale, so no inverted flight with the exception of GWS Estarter #4...the landing gear broke and I've been belly landing it lately. I discovered it loves flying inverted without the gear... So I cheat and use it on the high wingers.

I'll stick with my policy of none on the low wingers.
Mar 11, 2017, 03:53 PM
Fly as high as the Sun
Chinthing's Avatar
I only use a mix on planes that require more rudder than normal to make smooth turns and not drag the tail.....for example, my PZ Albatros D.va.
My only reason for doing this is a more relaxing flight, and to make it fly more like my other planes with similar inputs.
I fly the Alby slow and scale, so the mix doesn't have any negative effects on the plane.
Mar 12, 2017, 10:46 AM
Pro Semi Driver
Johnnysplits's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Burnooly
Johnny splits, I hope you are not talking about good vodka.
No, been using Prairie organic vodka for mixing. Tastes pretty good.
Mar 23, 2017, 07:26 AM
Registered User
MacKaris's Avatar
Using a bit of mixing can help to smooth out the movements of the model, both in turns and whenever you need to correct the bank angle a little - which is like every 3 seconds or so. It just basically helps to make the thing look a bit more realistic in the air. I use mixing on my Catalina and DC-3, as they look a lot better when flown smoothly and gently, but I still use manual rudder for coordinated turns (as coordinated as one can be without a slip indicator...), and for smaller or more aerobatic models the mix is a bit pointless.
Mar 23, 2017, 01:10 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by Burnooly
I'm an old flight instructor and shun these kinds of mixes. They are just a crutch that prevents you from learning to use the controls properly. Most often, they are not even a very good crutch.

For example, an aileron/rudder mix will only be right at one particular airspeed and orientation. At a higher airspeed it will be too much rudder. At a lower airspeed it won't be enough. Inverted it will be backwards. Its a poor compromise from the outset.

Watch the airplane and learn to use the control inputs that make it do what you want it to do. Get yourself a foam 3D plane - great leaning tool even if are aren't totally into 3D.

Johnny splits, I hope you are not talking about good vodka.
+1.

Nothing as good succeeding a nicely coordinated turn, without altitude loss and nose in line with trajectory. Flying a lot one's bird makes that second nature.

Next step : add a FPV cam in the cockpit stick a wool yarn and keep it in the middle.