Weathering Foam ARFs - RC Groups
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Jan 16, 2017, 03:22 PM
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Weathering Foam ARFs


Hi, I am new to weathering my foam ARFs and I am looking for some advice.
I have an airbrush and I have been comfortable with some dirt and exhaust stains put on with an airbrush. I have been reading on weathering for hard plastic models but don't see where many of the technics apply to foam arfs and I am looking for some ideas.

My questions are:
1) for foam arfs that hav molded in panel lines, what are some effective ways to get the look of a pin wash? A traditional wash might not work because of the foam beads throughout the surface which would also capture the wash instead of just the panel lines. I am worried that a fine tip marker might not get in the panel line groove of some of the newer planes, with finer panel lines and I am struggling with the color, even if I could get the ink in there. My choices seem to be black or a light brown, which I fear will not show on the painted foam (olive in one case). I could airbrush lines, but then the actual molded in line would not really have the darker color in there.

2) chalk or non chalk pastels. Similar problem on keeping the coloring where I want it. Any tips on oil/grease/dirt beyond what I can do with a panel line and airbrush? I am thinking lines and streaks on piston engine cowlings, etc.

Lastly, if anyone can point to some really good info on weathering foam arfs specifically, I would appreciate it. I think I have gone through most of the youtube videos, which largely focusing upon airbrushing.

Thank you,
Jeff
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Jan 20, 2017, 10:00 AM
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I'm not an expert and I will try charcoal powder and clear mat coat on my freewing tomcat but on my warbirds, so far I used airbrush and dry brushing with some good results.

For panel lines i place a masking tape just on the panel and airbrush it in the way of the airflow with some dark grey

For dirt I airbrush black and brown

For scratch I dry brush with aluminum or steel pain.

I use Tamya acrylics

A few pics :























On the corsair I washed the center of the panels with a lighter blue mix













Here you are. If you have specific questions let me know
Last edited by Shung; Jan 20, 2017 at 10:15 AM.
Jan 26, 2017, 12:18 PM
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Thank you Shung, I really appreciate your post. I think I have seen an E-Flite P-51 you did a while back. It was stunning, if I am thinking of the right guy and the right plane.

While your post is helpful, I would still like additional responses to my questions specifically about a pin wash for foam and pastels. I am learning to airbrush, but I am not there yet.
Thanks again,
Jeff



Quote:
Originally Posted by Shung
I'm not an expert and I will try charcoal powder and clear mat coat on my freewing tomcat but on my warbirds, so far I used airbrush and dry brushing with some good results.

For panel lines i place a masking tape just on the panel and airbrush it in the way of the airflow with some dark grey

For dirt I airbrush black and brown

For scratch I dry brush with aluminum or steel pain.

I use Tamya acrylics

A few pics :























On the corsair I washed the center of the panels with a lighter blue mix













Here you are. If you have specific questions let me know
Apr 25, 2017, 09:57 AM
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wmetcalf's Avatar
These examples have all been done with acrylic paints, pastels, alcohol washes, and fine-line markers. No airbrushing. All painted by hand.

Techniques involve dry-brushing and wet-brushing various acrylic tones and colors, rubbing on pastels with paper towels, cloths, and brushes, filling in panel lines, and adding additional lines and rivets. ink/alcohol washes are sometimes used to tie areas together and simulate dirty washes that occur on all aircraft stored outdoors. No final overcoat is used for protection as handling of the aircraft is minimal.

Materials are all professional-grade artist materials available at art-supply stores. Every project is a new experiment in effects and techniques, as every airplane comes from the factory with different materials and challenges. By using materials that can all be removed or wiped away if a mistake is made, the fear of "ruining" the model is greatly reduced. In fact, adding and re-adding material often gives the weathering more detail and nuance. You have to go into this without worrying that you'll mess up your pretty new model. Commit.....or forget about it.

These projects take a lot more time than most people realize, but they are very interesting to do and getting the whole thing to come together in a believable manner is very engaging. Getting a convincing effect is what it's all about. There are plenty of helpful images on the web, but mostly I just think about how wind, weather, maintenance, hangar rash, and battle damage would affect various surfaces (this could be a tank or an automobile). You can be creative and do your own thing. You don't have to copy anything to be successful. These are relatively small objects and exaggerating effects will actually add more life. Perhaps the most important thing is to apply whatever techniques you use equally to the entire aircraft.
Aug 05, 2017, 03:10 PM
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Happy to see this posting I was going to start one but this is good. I started with Vallejo products this is an unbelievable line of products. Have fun.

https://www.scalehobbyist.com/catago...ocknumber&so=a

http://www.acrylicosvallejo.com/en_US
These are websites where to buy paint. The other is the website to Vallejo paint, great info on painting and weathering. There are brush on and airbrush paints, plus all different types of washes. Take your time and read there are about 150 pages in the downloads.
I am in the process of learning to airbrush a lot of fun.

Ken
Aug 06, 2017, 12:39 AM
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One other quick tip that I picked up somewhere is to use Post-It notes instead of painters tape when you're dry brushing or chalk blending to highlight panel lines. Painters tape can pull of the foamie paint, even when it's been 'de-tacked' on jeans or carpet, etc.

I'm certainly an amateur compared to the amazing examples of the prior posts. If anyone has decent info on how to get a great looking wash, either powder or pastel, I'd love that info. I've made a few practice attempts on damaged wing pieces and wasn't happy with the results.

One thing that I've been doing this past week for the first time is simulating rivets. I've experimented with a few different methods, but I found that using a hobby syringe with a fairly large tip makes for an interesting effect. Just a bit of pressure and a little twisting motion and it's there. It doesn't take too long, either... just turn on some good tunes and go at it.
Aug 07, 2017, 09:50 AM
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To show tan on dark blue what colors are you used using?

Ken
Aug 07, 2017, 11:41 AM
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wmetcalf's Avatar
Pigments range from transparent through translucent, to virtually opaque. Almost any bright color you choose will have some degree of transparency, and also be the most prone to fading in Sunlight. Earth colors (Umber's, Sienna's) are the most opaque.

Putting a bright, high-keyed color over a dark color, or over ANY color for that matter, usually requires the use of an under-painting first. White is most often used because it will energize any transparent color put on top of it. Even white paints are not necessarily opaque, and there are several types of white, some with denser pigment than others. This means that even a white under-painting may require several coats to create a smooth and even effect. The cost of paints also reflects how much pigment is present in the mixture. With most paints, you get what you pay for. A high quality gallon of Cadmium Red artist Acrylic can cost $600.

So called "model paints" are no different than any others in pigment characteristics. What you do get is usually a binder or medium that is formulated for easy application by airbrush, or by paint brushes without leaving brush marks. But there is no magic. A transparent color will still be transparent, and the formulas used to enhance application may actually increase transparency.

It is best to avoid putting a lighter color over a darker color. It will always entail more work than you may like.
Aug 07, 2017, 03:08 PM
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I don't know about all the above but I do know that if I put Tan on dark blue it goes to black.

Ken
Aug 07, 2017, 08:19 PM
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Perhaps mix in some yellow? Test it first, though.
Aug 07, 2017, 09:01 PM
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I have been playing with it, come close but didn't write down what I did. Have some Badger Railroad colors coming see what they do. May have to just go with smoke or smoke transparent. The whole idea is just a subtle hint of color and have not been able to get that yet. Like I said learning to airbrush, air pressure and trigger pressure to get it right isn't as easy as it sounds but the learning is fun.

Ken
Aug 07, 2017, 10:59 PM
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wmetcalf's Avatar
Adding airbrush medium will apply less color but you risk getting a glossy finish from excess medium. Really, the only way is to learn to adjust the paint flow and pull the trigger very slightly. Then you can apply subtle layers and build up to what you want through repeated coats.

I have several professional airbrushes, but the hassle of mixing and cleaning them is why I use the methods I described earlier when I'm just treating a foamy.
Aug 10, 2017, 07:04 PM
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Bragdon weathering powder (developed for model railroad weathering and scenery) have a pressure sensitive, dry adhesive that will stick to most non-glossy surfaces. It is activated when the powders are brushed/rubbed on. If the plane is not handled much the adhesive keeps the powder fast without a topcoat. If you do topcoat it will "hide" most of the powder, requiring a heavier application to get the desired end result - this is true of any powder/chalk.
Aug 29, 2017, 06:57 AM
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I have been busying testing airbrush paints and methods of applying them to models, in few days I will post some photos. One of the methods I will be using is outlined in the thread Fading Base Coat.
Also I will post some YouTube showing how to do a quick color change. I change color in about 30 seconds.

Ken


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