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Dec 24, 2016, 11:22 AM
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BBCC8 Spirit of St Louis FF Glow to RC Electric Conversion


This is a second entry for BBCC8

Plan from Outerzone

Spirit of St Louis (Ryan NYP 4) 34" Free Flight version powered by 0.49 glow will be converted to RC Electric
Last edited by victapilot; Dec 24, 2016 at 01:33 PM.
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Dec 24, 2016, 11:28 AM
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Dec 25, 2016, 10:13 AM
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I have long been interested in building this one, so I will be watching this thread with interest.
Have you ever seen the movie, with Jimmy Stewart in it?
If not, you should watch it. It will really get you excited to begin the build! It's also a really good movie.

How many channels will you be going for?
Dec 25, 2016, 06:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by builderdude
Subscribed.

I have long been interested in building this one, so I will be watching this thread with interest.
Have you ever seen the movie, with Jimmy Stewart in it?
If not, you should watch it. It will really get you excited to begin the build! It's also a really good movie.

How many channels will you be going for?
Unless I missed it, I checked the BBCC archive, and was surprised nobody had done this one (unless I missed it )

Yes, I saw the movie long ago. As a kid, I had an illustrated comic strip book about the crossing, very heroic! The movie is on YouTube, also available at our local library on DVD, so I'll get it again.

I plan to build as per plan, with almost no dihedral (ie scale look). Therefore 4 channels will probably be the answer. I am conflicted however, 3 channels would save weight (like my second Lysander). I'll use a lot of the construction methods from that build. I'm thinking that ailerons will be useful to counteract the effects of the struts, and also allow a nice sideslip approach as per the real plane.
Dec 27, 2016, 10:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by victapilot
Unless I missed it, I checked the BBCC archive, and was surprised nobody had done this one (unless I missed it )

Yes, I saw the movie long ago. As a kid, I had an illustrated comic strip book about the crossing, very heroic! The movie is on YouTube, also available at our local library on DVD, so I'll get it again.

I plan to build as per plan, with almost no dihedral (ie scale look). Therefore 4 channels will probably be the answer. I am conflicted however, 3 channels would save weight (like my second Lysander). I'll use a lot of the construction methods from that build. I'm thinking that ailerons will be useful to counteract the effects of the struts, and also allow a nice sideslip approach as per the real plane.
I'd definitely recommend 4 channels, as I think you might encounter adverse yaw on this planform, which will require rudder as well as ailerons.
I have never used it before because of what I consider the high cost, but have you considered a Spectrum brick? That would give you the receiver as well as the tailfeather servos, I think. But Andy Kunz could tell you more.
Then all you would need is your aileron servos.

However, take a look at my BBCC7-8 Gee Bee R2 thread. I used only one servo to actuate both ailerons. It's a little bit tricky to set up but it works well. That'll save you the weight of a second servo as well as the Y-connector and extensions.
Basically what I did was to centrally mount the aileron servo and then used torque rods inside tubes to actuate each aileron. The torque rod is bent at a 90 degree angle and comes up into the servo thingies, one on each side.
If you use that method, you'll want to mount your center aileron servo in the bottom of the wing, probably.

Anyway that's up to you...
Dec 27, 2016, 01:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by builderdude
I'd definitely recommend 4 channels, as I think you might encounter adverse yaw on this planform, which will require rudder as well as ailerons.
I have never used it before because of what I consider the high cost, but have you considered a Spectrum brick? That would give you the receiver as well as the tailfeather servos, I think. But Andy Kunz could tell you more.
Then all you would need is your aileron servos.

However, take a look at my BBCC7-8 Gee Bee R2 thread. I used only one servo to actuate both ailerons. It's a little bit tricky to set up but it works well. That'll save you the weight of a second servo as well as the Y-connector and extensions.
Basically what I did was to centrally mount the aileron servo and then used torque rods inside tubes to actuate each aileron. The torque rod is bent at a 90 degree angle and comes up into the servo thingies, one on each side.
If you use that method, you'll want to mount your center aileron servo in the bottom of the wing, probably.

Anyway that's up to you...

Good idea re the Spektrum brick, thanks! I didn't think of that, but it would work.

I want this to be a plane that I can give to a recently certified pilot, maybe as a "graduation" gift. So it should be light, robust, and not too expensive. If I build it like the Lysander, it should be a quick build. That one weighs 10oz.
Apr 27, 2017, 02:59 PM
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I'm looking at using a 16g 2211 motor. This is a great little motor, I have one ready to go. Only downside is it has a 2mm shaft, so better not crash it.

https://hobbyking.com/en_us/hextroni...er-1700kv.html

Need to run on 2s, will use a 10A ESC.

I'll make my shopping list and pick up some items, including balsa, at the Joe Nall coming soon!
Apr 27, 2017, 04:52 PM
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I typically don't like to select a motor until the airplane is almost fully built, in its bones, and all the electronic gear is added. I can then get an accurate weight prediction and use that plus the wing loading to select the motor I want.

Or hit it with massive overkill, then I know I have enough power.
Usually I use the first method.
Apr 27, 2017, 07:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by builderdude
I typically don't like to select a motor until the airplane is almost fully built, in its bones, and all the electronic gear is added. I can then get an accurate weight prediction and use that plus the wing loading to select the motor I want.

Or hit it with massive overkill, then I know I have enough power.
Usually I use the first method.
Makes sense, the variety of motors on the market is endless.

I chose this motor after looking at the plans and positioning a few motors that I have over them. Note that the fuselage of this model is quite slim, so motor dimensions was the main factor. Secondly, I have one spare. I guess that if I can get the weight around 8-10oz, it will fly well.

I think that some aviation pioneers built the plane around a specific engine. For example the De Havilland Puss Moth was built to take the existing Gypsy engine. They basically built the best plane they could for the engine they already had.

I have used both of your methods as well. The first method is generally more successful for me.
May 17, 2017, 03:34 PM
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Getting started


I'm building this with 1/16" sheet sides, steamed and prebent. This should suit this plane which has a box fuselage aft. The front will need to be built up with balsa per plan (more or less) and carved to transition to the round front. Mid bulkhead frame is 1/2x1/8 lite ply
May 19, 2017, 07:35 AM
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Snaps


The plan shows the rear of the wing attached to the fuselage with dressmaker snaps. Same for the struts. So I went out and bought some to try. The size on the plan matches the mid-size on the card (2/0), and they seem plenty strong

Seems to be a brilliant idea, but now I'm wondering how to "sew" on the snaps. Must avoid getting glue into the spring area.
May 19, 2017, 10:52 AM
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They should have a ring of six holes in the perimeter, IIRC. You use those to stitch it to the wood, just like we did for hinges.

Andy
May 19, 2017, 11:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AndyKunz
They should have a ring of six holes in the perimeter, IIRC. You use those to stitch it to the wood, just like we did for hinges.

Andy
I'm thinking of sewing them to little ply circles then glueing.
Jun 06, 2017, 12:24 PM
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Fuselage


The front end of the fuselage transitions from square cross section to round. The plan uses 1/4", I built up two layers 1/8"

edit> Forward hatch laminated with 1/16 balsa, will sand to round
Last edited by victapilot; Jun 25, 2017 at 08:13 PM.
Jun 30, 2017, 09:47 AM
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Wing


Quote:
Originally Posted by builderdude
However, take a look at my BBCC7-8 Gee Bee R2 thread. I used only one servo to actuate both ailerons. It's a little bit tricky to set up but it works well. That'll save you the weight of a second servo as well as the Y-connector and extensions.
Basically what I did was to centrally mount the aileron servo and then used torque rods inside tubes to actuate each aileron. The torque rod is bent at a 90 degree angle and comes up into the servo thingies, one on each side.
If you use that method, you'll want to mount your center aileron servo in the bottom of the wing, probably.

Anyway that's up to you...
That's what I'll do! I have some torque rods from a GWS kit that I will use.

The plan offers two suggested wings, one with scale rib spacing and 1/32" ribs, the alternative has fewer 1/16" ribs. I'll do the 1/16" option, 16 ribs. I use balsa from National Balsa, and was impressed that a stack of 16 measures close to 1 inch thick . Quite precise!
Last edited by victapilot; Jul 03, 2017 at 06:41 PM.


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