DX8 Gen1 & Gen2 - What Are Differences? - RC Groups
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Dec 04, 2016, 06:59 PM
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David Wile's Avatar
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DX8 Gen1 & Gen2 - What Are Differences?


Hey folks,

I have had my DX8 (Gen1) for nearly two years now, and I am wondering whether I should consider going to a DX8 Gen 2. Points concerning my particular usage are as follows:
Fixed wing aircraft only.
Use Apprentice SAFE receivers in most aircraft including E-flite P-51 Dallas Doll Mustang (flaps & retracts are combined to work with 5 channel SAFE receiver).
Not likely to need more than 8 channels.
I am able to set dual rates, but always fly at 100% rate.
No idea how or why to use mixes, but understand new transmitter does curve mixes as well as line mixes. Will this be important in future?
I may not understand mixes, but I may grow into their use in future.
Cannot imagine why transmitter voice would be useful to me.
While I do not use all the switches, I do use half of them and would use more if I ever use more channels.
I only use about ten of the 30 programmable slots available.
I do not belong to any clubs and fly mostly at a public park with a buddy.
So far, I have been able to set up all my planes on my DX8 even when the manual gives instructions for the Gen2 transmitter.
AMain has a DX8 Gen2 listed for $233 less a $15 promotion for a net of $218. Their ad says it includes a Quad Racing Serial Receiver with Diversity which provides a high speed serial data connection with up to 20 channels. What is this and am I reading the ad correctly?

https://www.amainhobbies.com/spektru...2qbxoCGz3w_wcB

My DX8 has provided me with excellent service since I first began flying nearly two years ago. I am not a power user by any means and cannot imagine ever using more than 8 channels. While I fly two warbirds with flaps and retracts, I only use five channels with the retracts and flaps combined to accommodate my use of the 5 channel Apprentice SAFE receivers. I would expect before long I would move to a plane with a SAFE Select receiver, and I would then finally be using six channels with flaps and retract separated. Using more than 8 channels? I just do not see it. So far I have not had to learn about mixes, but that may change in the future. I know there is nothing on a DX9 to make me want to spend more money, so that is not a consideration.

Based on what I have described, can folks discuss the differences between the first and second generation DX8s? I would like some ideas as to whether the new generation DX8 would make enough of a difference for me to buy the new generation. I thank you all in advance for all information.

Best wishes,
Dave Wile
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Dec 04, 2016, 07:05 PM
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ivanc's Avatar
Dave,

You pretty much covered the differences and why you may not benefit from the G2 - voice, 250 model memory, channel sequencers, more advanced set ups.

Ivan
Dec 04, 2016, 07:27 PM
AndyKunz's Avatar
Dave,

I think you're fine where you are. You have a solid radio, and the DX8G2 lacks one thing you may need - those two trimmers on the top. The DX9 is actually closer to the DX8G1 in feel and inputs than the DX8G2 is.

Andy
Dec 04, 2016, 07:43 PM
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freechip's Avatar
I have a DX8 original and will say upgrading from it to g2 wouldn't be that much of an upgrade IMO. Apart from the obvious WLT and Voice Alerts it lacks some inputs.

If you really want to upgrade consider the DX9 instead.
Dec 05, 2016, 11:28 AM
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David Wile's Avatar
Hey folks,

Thanks to you all for the comments and advice. It seems buying a Gen2 DX8 is really not necessary for my purposes, so I will keep my old reliable.

Quote:
As posted by Andy:
I think you're fine where you are. You have a solid radio, and the DX8G2 lacks one thing you may need - those two trimmers on the top. The DX9 is actually closer to the DX8G1 in feel and inputs than the DX8G2 is.

Andy
Hey Andy,

I previously mentioned that I only have a limited knowledge of my DX8 features; it seems I only learn what I need to get by. I am sitting here with my DX8 alongside me, and I am looking at the two "trimmers" you noted which are alongside the two three-positions switches, and I have absolutely no idea for what they are used. Could you fill me in on their purpose?

Best wishes,
Dave Wile
Dec 05, 2016, 11:38 AM
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freechip's Avatar
You can use them as Trimmers for various things and also as Inputs for various things.
Tail Curve and Gyro adjustment are some of the functions you can do with them.

For my airplanes I often use them for Steering Trims with models equiped with seperate steering servo.

Use Rudder Trim for the Rudder and use Left or Right Trimmer to trim the nose/tail gear for taxing.
Dec 05, 2016, 10:03 PM
Headed down the far side.
David Wile's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by freechip
You can use them as Trimmers for various things and also as Inputs for various things.
Tail Curve and Gyro adjustment are some of the functions you can do with them.

For my airplanes I often use them for Steering Trims with models equiped with seperate steering servo.

Use Rudder Trim for the Rudder and use Left or Right Trimmer to trim the nose/tail gear for taxing.
Hey Freechip,

I hate to sound so dense, but your post has gone over my head as so many other things do. I previously said I really did not know for what use the trimmers which Andy mentioned earlier were intended and asked for what they were used.

Now you tell me they can be used for "...Tail Curve and Gyro adjustment..." I started flying nearly two years ago, and I feel like a dunce to admit I have no idea what Tail Curve and Gyro Adjustment means. I never heard of it. Obviously there is no end to what we can learn in this RC flying, but it is a bit daunting for this old man.

Then you say to "Use Rudder Trim for the Rudder and use Left or Right Trimmer to trim the nose/tail gear for taxiing." This is killing me to have to ask such questions, but why would you use these trimmers instead of the regular trimmers alongside the sticks? I does not seem stupid to me to ask these questions, but it certainly makes me feel stupid. It the answers are so obvious and should be known by me, please give me a break - I really do not know. As I said earlier, I have been flying nearly two years and using my DX8 very happily, but I do tend to not learn any more than I need to meet my flying requirements.

Thanks for your response and consideration.

Best wishes,
Dave Wile
Dec 05, 2016, 10:15 PM
S.A.D. member
ivanc's Avatar
Dave,

You can assign two different channels to be controlled by the rudder stick - one for the rudder and the second for the steering wheel - either front or rear. Normally you would use the rudder trim to trim out the rudder. Now you can assign the additional trimmer to trim the steerable wheel so your plane steers straight on the ground with the rudder stick centered.

Ivan
Dec 06, 2016, 01:17 AM
Registered User
If you want to fly helis sometimes you can use the trils to change the gyro gain for the tail. The gyro controls the tail. If the gain is to low, the tail stops soft. If the gain is too high, the tail oscillates. So it is handy to adjust it during flight. By using the trim you can have different settings for different headspeeds (which is needed)
At least that is what I am using it for.
The second trim I am using to change the headspeed. Sometimes you get resonances and it is handy to change the headspeed a little. This can be done easily during flight using the trimmer.
You see, the trims can be useful for different types of models
You can or cannot use them.
Dec 06, 2016, 04:40 AM
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freechip's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Wile
Hey Freechip, I hate to sound so dense, but your post has gone over my head as so many other things do. ...snip...
Then you say to "Use Rudder Trim for the Rudder and use Left or Right Trimmer to trim the nose/tail gear for taxiing." This is killing me to have to ask such questions, but why would you use these trimmers instead of the regular trimmers alongside the sticks? ...snip... Thanks for your response and consideration.
Best wishes,
Dave Wile
Quote:
Originally Posted by ivanc
Dave,

You can assign two different channels to be controlled by the rudder stick - one for the rudder and the second for the steering wheel - either front or rear. Normally you would use the rudder trim to trim out the rudder. Now you can assign the additional trimmer to trim the steerable wheel so your plane steers straight on the ground with the rudder stick centered.

Ivan
+1 - I'm sure in my original response I said using a seperate servo but I may have failed to mentioned also using seperate Channel BUT the above response to you nailed it.
Dec 06, 2016, 10:08 AM
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David Wile's Avatar
Hey folks,

Thanks so much for the responses from you all. For the limited type of fixed wing flying I do, I suspect I am not too likely to be using these trimmers in the near future. I am also not too likely to ever use all the switches and other bells and whistles on my DX8, but I am glad that I bought it when I started. I was going to say I was only using five of the eight channels available to me on my DX8. However, I am now thinking that using an Apprentice SAFE receiver in my Dallas Doll would actually be using seven of the eight channels available to me on the DX8: four channels for the throttle and three axis controls, one channel for the combined retracts and flaps, one channel for the SAFE flight mode control switch, and one channel for the Panic button. If that is correct, I am getting close to the eight channel limit of the DX8.

Best wishes,
Dave Wile
Dec 06, 2016, 10:16 AM
AndyKunz's Avatar
Yes, that would put you close. But I still think you have plenty of radio for a while.

I used to live out near you. I went to college at Messiah for a year. For several years I tried to get a job in that area, but seeing how it's developed since then, I'm kinda glad I didn't. I've taken most of my kids, one at a time, to Brothers on 15 to eat. Lots of good memories about that area.

Andy
Dec 06, 2016, 10:21 AM
Surface, Air & Water Rc Toys..
freechip's Avatar
@David Wile - Not familiar with the model you spoke of BUT chances are the throttle would all be on one channel via Y harness. If you are infact talking about having all 4 throttle channels on seperate channels make sure you use a receiver Capable of Preset Failsafe in order to have proper Failsafe function for those other 3 throttle channels.

With the DX8 the AR8000 of course would be perfect since it has the right Failsafe Functions for that job.
Dec 06, 2016, 01:18 PM
Headed down the far side.
David Wile's Avatar
Hey Andy,

Yes, we live within two or three miles of Messiah. For the past few months I have been thinking about buying a seaplane even I do not have a pond nearby. Then I thought of the pond at Messiah Village along Route 15. If their pond is big enough for me to take off and land, I think I will ask permission to fly there. It should not be a danger, and their guests may find the show very entertaining.

I have been agonizing about which plane to buy: the E-flite Icon A5 or the Flyzone Seawind. They both have advantages and disadvantages to me, so I will likely buy whichever one comes up with a really good sale price this winter. I would like to try the SAFE Select of the Icon A5, but if I get the Seawind, I will put an Apprentice SAFE receiver in it. The retracts and flaps on the Seawind are also quite appealing.

Come back and see us some time.

Best wishes,
Dave Wile
Dec 06, 2016, 01:54 PM
AndyKunz's Avatar
I am putting the SAFE receiver from a Mini Apprentice in a flying boat I'm working on. It's pretty similar in most regards except weight. I can't wait to see how it turns out.

At one point MC had an aviation club that was building a homebuilt. I don't know if the prof or club still is around.

You need to try when the soccer fields are flooded in the spring. Then you can fly under the covered bridge! The pond at MV is kind of close to the highway, isn't it? I'd be concerned about hitting a north-bound windshield accidentally.

My daughter almost went there this fall. They've really beefed up the music program since I attended.

Andy