Scratch Build Logging Tug - Page 5 - RC Groups
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Dec 19, 2016, 03:21 PM
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CaptCB's Avatar
Judging by this photo, I would gather, they are just cosmetic. As it shows the same brass / stainless shaft combination.
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Dec 19, 2016, 04:30 PM
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Robert F's Avatar
Capt CB, If I had used the dog and bone it would have been even longer and nosier, these coupling have been centred on a lathe and run perfectly fine. As for the rudders they are not for show only. Fully functioning from milled aluminium and brass strip. Cheers Rob
Dec 19, 2016, 08:02 PM
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CaptCB's Avatar
It wasn't the "rudders" we were discussing, It was the "simulated" (or not ??) joint, were they bolt the rudders in the real tugs.
Tim was wondering, if you could "unbolt them", for removal.
Looking at how they are made, I am "guessing", that joint is a show detail, and does not actually come apart??

I have run the Dumas dogbone system, at some pretty good angels, and it was almost silent.
Two photo's of the approx 3/16'' offset in my pushboat, and it has been running like that, for over 15 years.
We changed the gearbox, and the new one was a different offset. It runs quiet, and has run the same "dogbone", since the boat was built in the mid. '90's.
Last edited by CaptCB; Dec 19, 2016 at 08:19 PM. Reason: Added photo's.
Dec 19, 2016, 10:52 PM
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Band1's Avatar
Great work on the pilot house !
Dec 20, 2016, 01:24 AM
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Robert F's Avatar
My apologies Cap CB, the picture you quoted did not show the flanges just the bare rudders. Yes the flanges are cosmetic in this instance, but do the job they were made for, the impression of reality. As for the drivetrain each unto their own, that's how we roll, however I appreciate your suggestions. Cheers Rob
Dec 20, 2016, 12:49 PM
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CaptCB's Avatar

Rob,


By hobby "standards" I tend to "over engineer / build". I use the skills from what I used to do for about 30 years, in my r/c boat building. For YEARS, both Ron Burchett, and CaptLee, (both good friends) used to tell me I was "over building". But several years back, they decided my "over building" might not have been a bad thing. As with "minor up-grades" I was still running with the best, using a boat that was built over 20 years ago.
I don't get as many boats built as some do, but I know they will be running, and competitive, for some time to come.
This is what I used to do for my real job, and after years of doing this type of work, I still "think" and "build" that way.
Happy Holidays, CB
Dec 21, 2016, 01:28 AM
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Robert F's Avatar
Nice cars there Capt CB and in that game attention to detail is everything, the difference between winning and losing or selling. I still like to learn something new and if I like it I'll use it, we all hope to evolve and make better models.

ATB

Rob
Last edited by Robert F; Jan 04, 2017 at 01:16 AM.
Jan 03, 2017, 01:13 AM
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Robert F's Avatar
Just a quick up date, the rear bulwarks have now been totally removed, I liked the way they did this on the Ken. However I'm not building Ken just using it as a guide so I did it how I think it could be done. The bulwarks have been replaced with brass rod which has been soldered and glassed into the deck. The towing bar is also brass and soldered up in the same way. The rear towing rollers are aluminium bar and mounted on ally axles. Added detail will be applied.
Last edited by Robert F; Jan 04, 2017 at 01:19 AM.
Jan 09, 2017, 01:15 AM
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Robert F's Avatar
Small up date, attention turned to the operation of the rudders and how to avoid water ingress through the rudder posts because the tops are not above the waterline. My solution was to section off an area around them and allow it to free flood. So bulk head and lid were cut to shape. All rudder components were fabricated from brass and pegged and soldered into place because it will be inaccessible after the deck is fitted. A small jig was fabricated to keep all the rudders aligned while linkages were made and fitted. Note after trials it appears water will not enter the area due to pressure result. And there is a sneak peak at the motor of choice, plenty power to spin those 70mm props. Cheers Rob.
Last edited by Robert F; Jan 09, 2017 at 01:46 AM.
Jan 09, 2017, 08:36 AM
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Sylvain's Avatar
Robert,
I always use stuffing box (I make my own) for the rudders and I fill them with grease. This way, no matter if the top of the tubes are above or under the water they will be watertight.

Wow, you decided to go the brushless way! Is that a 2:1 gearboxe? Are you going to run it on lipo batteries?

Nice work Robert.
Jan 09, 2017, 09:34 AM
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Tim B.'s Avatar
Great looking rudders !
Jan 09, 2017, 11:13 AM
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Band1's Avatar
Well done !
Jan 09, 2017, 12:36 PM
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Robert F's Avatar
Hi Sylvain I had considered stuffing boxes as it's tried and tested. Two reasons for opting not to were, 1 if the seal failed there's no way of replacing. 2 I was hoping the water coming on board would reduce the ballast needed to get her down to the water line. That has now proven wrong lol. Yes I have opted to go brushless, more efficient and self cooling. Yes it is a 2:1 reduction, planning to run on 3c lipo 11.1 v can't have enough power😉. Thanks for the kind comments.
Jan 09, 2017, 01:36 PM
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Great project and plenty to get me inspired.
Jan 09, 2017, 07:41 PM
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Sylvain's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert F
Hi Sylvain I had considered stuffing boxes as it's tried and tested. Two reasons for opting not to were, 1 if the seal failed there's no way of replacing. 2 I was hoping the water coming on board would reduce the ballast needed to get her down to the water line. That has now proven wrong lol. Yes I have opted to go brushless, more efficient and self cooling. Yes it is a 2:1 reduction, planning to run on 3c lipo 11.1 v can't have enough power😉. Thanks for the kind comments.
Wow Robert, that means 6100rpm at the props That tug is going to fly . Can't wait to see it on the water!


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