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Dec 19, 2004, 10:33 PM
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I really NEED my fingers...to pick my nose, and do all sorts of other useful things.
Having been bitten too many times(including in my diesel phase, I owned stinkers up to .35 size)...it's just no fun anymore!
I use electric start on EVERYTHING nowadays. I have a small starter I use on stuff all the way down to 01s.
I do sometimes use the spring starters, though. They serve an addition purpose on the reed valve engines, they make sure they start in the correct direction. Seen a few planes launched with the engine going backwards, it's pretty funny!

Wuss? I'll have you know I make my own glue and grow my own balsa!
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Dec 25, 2004, 12:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serceflyer
Is there a "pull-string" method for starting one of these engines? Or, is it called a "starter-pull?" I've read references to this, but have no clue what it means.Thanks
Do you mean like these?
Dec 25, 2004, 01:05 PM
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Or this?
Dec 25, 2004, 01:28 PM
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There are other types, too. As a matter of fact, OK got sued by WenMac for ripping off their starter, and had to make wenmacs in compensation. That was the spring type starter without the pull string.
Dec 26, 2004, 12:57 AM
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Ian Easton's Avatar
Mine looks like post # 18
Dec 26, 2004, 01:13 AM
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I'd stay away from that wrapping the string method...it's kind of dangerous! Get a cox spring starter, safer and easier.
Dec 26, 2004, 01:13 AM
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Send me a SASE and I'll give you one.
Dec 26, 2004, 08:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by easytiger
There are other types, too. As a matter of fact, OK got sued by WenMac for ripping off their starter, and had to make wenmacs in compensation. That was the spring type starter without the pull string.
Good grief! You must be older than myself to recall that. Seriously--I just learned something. My day isn't wasted. Could that have had a bearing on why OK shut their doors also?
In the pic of the one with the recoil starter note that the engine has a velocity stack installed in the carb throat. Note how small the intake passage is in the new stack. I've noted this on several of the Cubs over the years and wondered why they would have done this. While a velocity stack (according to a conversation with Joe Wagner) can do several good things one as restricted as the one in the photo would limit the amount of air that could be ingested also, thereby reducing power output. I find myself wondering if this was done to engines intended to be sold to 'newbies' because it would also make them easier to start, more mild-mannered and, possibly, easier to needle. Comments?
So long as O K Cubs are the subject-----does anyone reading this have a Cub reed valve corpse that they will turn loose of cheaply? I need one to cannibalize for parts for a carburetion experiment. And on that topic, who built reedies except Cox, OK, K&B and Wen-Mac? Tom
Dec 26, 2004, 10:08 AM
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olmod's Avatar

reed mmmm


I bought new a Frog webramatic or reedamatic 150 too long ago to remember, but i did have an ok cub as new that someone had fitted a long series plug in and couldnt' get to go lol i put in the right size and no probs' but it intrigues me people saying that they were a newbs motor,my experience was i thought it was about a 150 (big mistake)and i put it in a control liner semi profile trainer and it screamed its tits off i was so dizzy i was glad to land it
Dec 26, 2004, 01:09 PM
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Ian Easton's Avatar
Now that you mention it, my cub, with the string pull, also has the velocity stack. I bought it brand new a year ago and wondered about that stack and if I should remove it. I did smooth the needle a bit to help fuel metereing to be a bit more precise (I read about doing that hear somewhere).
Dec 26, 2004, 01:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian Easton
Now that you mention it, my cub, with the string pull, also has the velocity stack. I bought it brand new a year ago and wondered about that stack and if I should remove it. I did smooth the needle a bit to help fuel metereing to be a bit more precise (I read about doing that hear somewhere).
You may have read something about the Cub needle valve being so coarse as to transition from too rich to too lean in less than a turn as posted by Larry Renger on the 1/2A forum on RCU IIRC. His recommended 'fix' was to press out the stock NV assy and substitute one removed from a Cox product engine backplate. In the coarse of converting a Cub to use an RJL diesel head I tried that.
The Cox assy was smaller than the one I removed from the OK engine. I survived that by substituting a NV assy from a DC engine. I have subsequently discovered that the Cox product engines had more than one NV assy however; the 2nd one I noticed appears (I didn't measure it--only noted a significant difference in diameter) to indeed make the 'fix' feasible. So, should you try it, be aware that you must have the RIGHT Cox assy for it to work. I think it's a great idea--------now that I am aware of the possibility of a foul-up, to lose the too coarse Cub needle and sub the much finer Cox assy. The Conversion is still unfinished but I anticipate the DC NV will make arriving at a 'needle' much less painless. HTH, Tom
Dec 27, 2004, 09:38 AM
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Ian Easton's Avatar
I can't remember where I read it but I took a fine needle file and smooth emery cloth and just smoothed the needle a bit - it seemed to work fine.
Dec 27, 2004, 09:40 AM
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I think Larry Renger and those guys might be a little fussy...honestly, I have never had a problem with the metering of the stock OK needle...but I can't see the harm of the mod, either.
You have to watch out, though, OFTEN OK cubs have built in manufacturing flaws, like burrs in the spraybar, that kind of thing.
Usually fixable.
By the way, Ted Brebeck says OK cub engines is for sale, the whole company, so he can focus on trains...
May 17, 2019, 03:03 PM
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E-Challenged's Avatar
OK Cub engines had a very short venturi which didn't help fuel draw from a remote tank. The few I fiddled with had modest power and weren't eager to start. The display box was quite attractive though.
May 19, 2019, 03:11 PM
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rchopper56's Avatar
Thru all of mine away or traded them in to AHC for the discount on an order placed. The ones that I had were used for control line but as soon as I had my first COX Babe Bee ($3.95), the OK engines were gone. Did not like the power or difficulties in starting.

Gene


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