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Nov 11, 2016, 01:20 PM
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Guizzo 17's Avatar
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Build Log

BBCC8- I-baga 14 C/L stunt to electric R/C


With the good season over, I'm back to the bench with my new projects.

When I started building model airplanes I was a teenager and I mainly built C/L stunt planes, since this was what my friends and chaperon used to do.

One of the models I had built was the I-Baga 14. It was designed on 1961 by Marino (father) and Valter (Son) Bagalini which where modelers for passion and aeronautical engineers for duty. Valter was one of the best stunt modeler and Italian champion for two years. Sadly he left us quite young.

The model was one of a kind and I recall that it was a great flier. I built mine and it ended incredibly light even if I didn't choose my balsa from the lightest possible. Ready-to-fly it was a mehre1.1 kilo, definitely not common for a stunt model that times!

It's time now to build a new one convert it to electric R/C. Actually I'm going to build two planes, the second for a friend of mine, and since I prefer small models to large ones, I'm going to build a 75% version of the original. This will bring the 1.4 meter model to almost exactly 1meter. I hope to stay under 500g ( 18oz ) so a 150 ̴ 200W outrunner will provide plenty of power.

I'll try to stay as close as possible to the original building method but some changes are in order, like reducing a bit the side thrust for instance!

At the moment I'm retracing the plan with the due changes.
Last edited by Guizzo 17; Dec 22, 2016 at 04:02 PM.
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Nov 11, 2016, 04:44 PM
I like real wooden aeroplanes!
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Looks like another fascinating project Guizzo. I remember the "I-BAGA" C/L aerobatic models from contest reports in Aeromodeller.
Nov 14, 2016, 12:26 PM
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Thanks SD; I hope it'll be interesting at least!
I like C/L but they are not for me anymore, however they have the right proportion to be good R/C models and, at this dimensions, I'm sure is less tricky than my Radian (which, regardless the first results, now flies well and do not need gyro stabilizers!).
I forgot to say that the plan is in Outerzone.

The vertical tail is built with scraps balsa and sanded and tapered to shape .
L.E. On the original was poplar rod and I recall a bit flimsy on my model.
However, for this reduced scale version the use of C/F tube it's an overkill, but since nowadays it's cheaper than poplar rod, I use it!
Nov 24, 2016, 04:42 PM
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Working on the wing now!
Each wing panel requires two plywood and eight balsa ribs for a total of 40 ribs for two models.
I first cut the plywood ones and using them as a guide, I cut the remaining from 1.5mm balsa. Not a job I particularly like, specially considering that the wing has two upper and two lower spars and I had to cut the notches for them, plus four recesses for the leading and trailing edge covers! The first four root ribs are lightened internally to make the required spaces for servos, cables and landing gears.
The original model had a NACA 0018 wing section that I slightly altered making the profile flat from the rear spar to the trailing edge. Doing this I may lay the parts on the building board and be sure to make a straight panel.
Just to relax a bit while I was cutting the ribs, I prepared the wing tips laminating them with 4 layers of 1mm balsa and 4 layers of 0.6mm spruce. I also cut the ailerons from 4mm balsa which are just waiting for the covering.
Nov 24, 2016, 04:50 PM
I like real wooden aeroplanes!
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Looks like these two will be to your usual immaculate standard Guizzo. It's a long time since I built two of the same design together, something I used to do regularly in my long ago F/F contest days - two Dixielanders, two Eurekas, two Caprices etc. The interesting thing was that it used to take significantly less time than 2 x building a single example. Advantages of mass production I guess.
Nov 24, 2016, 06:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sundancer
It's a long time since I built two of the same design together, something I used to do regularly in my long ago F/F contest days - two Dixielanders, two Eurekas, two Caprices etc. The interesting thing was that it used to take significantly less time than 2 x building a single example. Advantages of mass production I guess.
I guess you are right but actually I don't know if it'll take much less time.
Differently to what you used to do, this is the first trial where I built two identical model at once.
I usually have several different planes laying together on my building room and some of them are quite old and not finished yet.
Will this possibly be evincive you are right!
Nov 26, 2016, 11:19 AM
RFJ
RFJ
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Quote:
I remember the "I-BAGA" C/L aerobatic models from contest reports in Aeromodeller
1966 World Champs 7th place
1968 World Champs 7th place

Ray
Last edited by RFJ; Nov 27, 2016 at 06:21 AM.
Nov 27, 2016, 01:13 PM
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Guizzo 17's Avatar
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Right RFJ, those are the chaps! I recall that Valter qualified among the first five in the European championship during that years but Im not sure...

more steps ahead!
I left for last the chores to glue the trailing edges to the root wing sheetings and spars.
I remember I made something similar years ago while a friend asked me to help covering a foam wing core with balsa.
We spent quite a lot of time laying shoulder-to-shoulder the sheets and trying to make the joint flat and true.
No matter what we were using, PVA glue or balsa cement, the joints were a mess. We wasted precious balsa sheets in our attempt and the final result left us unpleased.
It was with this reminiscence that I begun to do the task, but this time I followed the instructions I read in an old Flying Model article and I coupled the parts with tape first, then I spread along the joint a thin amount of ambroid and layed the parts on the board with weights on top. The result was pleasant, gratifying and uneventful. I even made a trial using Cyano, surely it is faster but not so good since some pieces of tape stuck to the balsa.
Nov 27, 2016, 04:31 PM
I like real wooden aeroplanes!
Sundancer's Avatar
Yep, that's the way to join balsa sheeting Guizzo - hinge them with tape, use balsa cement, weight or pin down. Works every time and when sanded the joint just disappears.
Nov 27, 2016, 06:01 PM
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You are right SD. But that time, when I first tried to join the balsa sheets I didn't know the trick!
This time, doing it the right way it worked so well that I have obtained an invisible joint without sanding! And this is important, since the balsa Im using to cover the wing is just 1mm.
By the way, for the original and bigger model the balsa L.E. wing cover was just 0.75mm!
Dec 10, 2016, 02:01 PM
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This week I was able to glue the upper part of the trailing edge and the top-rear root covering (Picture 1).

It took me quite a lot of time to solve how to install the aileron servos, then I chose what I thought was the simplest way.
The servo trays are made gluing a 1mm plywood to 3mm balsa sheet.
Each tray is held in place to the lower spars which are locally reinforced with 3mm plywood. ( Picture 2-5).

The trays are externally shaped to conform to the wing section. To avoid sanding unwanted parts, I used paper tape ( Picture 6- 8).

The original model used a removable but rigid landing gear which was adequate for a stunt model that normally makes very smooth and soft landings; however, for an R/C conversion, a more flexible gear may save the entire wing from destruction during possible harsh landings.
The track of the gear, adequate for a C/L model, is a bit narrow for R/C, anyway I'll keep it unchanged in order to maintain the original look.
I used 2,5mm piano wire for the legs (I still have to learn how to bend it!) and, to sew them to the plywood shear webs, I copied the smart method JMP blackfoot had adopted for his "Bombette". (http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2728196).
A small section of a collapsible antenna tube acts as a bearing to let the torsion bar freely bend (Picture 9).

Two pieces of cardstock were used to hold the legs with the proper camber and rake angle while sewing and gluing the landing gear to the shear webs (Picture 10).

Last, I cut a slit to the servo trays where the legs come out and made it sufficiently wide to let the gear bend freely (Picture 11 - 12).
Dec 10, 2016, 06:23 PM
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owlsabie's Avatar
Lovely work!
Dec 11, 2016, 01:58 PM
56
Hello Gizzo ,

file added with the results ; can you give me if you know the surname of the italians to complite the scores .
I make the results files of all the world champs for my federation (FFAM). It is a long work !

Regard all

Guy


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