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Oct 13, 2016, 04:06 AM
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Dynam Hawk Sky V2 1370mm Wingspan, mini Review and Discussion


This is my mini-review of the Hawk Sky V2 RTF version. I received my Hawk Sky V2 airplane RTF version from GearBest.com. It can best be described as a beginner Hand Launch Glider (HLG).

It is available for purchase at GearBest for $152.68, or $177.23 if shipped from the Canadian warehouse.

The PNP version linked here, is also available at at GearBest.com for $111.61.

GENERAL DATA from the manufacturer:
Material: EPO foam
Brand: Dynam
4 Channels: THR, AIL, ELE, RUD
Wingspan: 1370mm/53.9in
Length: 950mm/37.4in
Flying Weight: 600g / 21.16oz, (This is inaccurate. It must be empty weight.)
Empty Weight without LG - My measurements, 594g
Empty Weight with LG - My measurements, 621g (LG weighs 26.9g)

Wing Area: 24.7 sq.dm.  
Wing Loading: 31.2g/sq.dm
Published Flying Weight: 770g
Flying weight without LG: 775g - my measurement
Flying weight with LG: 802g - my measurement
Center of Gravity (CG): 58-62mm aft of the wing’s leading edge (LE) at the root  
ESC: 30A  
Motor: BM2810mm Kv1900  
Servos: 9g x 4pcs
Landing Gear (LG): Fixed  
Battery: Dynam 11.1V 2200mAh 25C included (Actual C rating on battery says 20C)
Radio: 4Ch 2.4Ghz included, Mode 2, left hand throttle
Charger: SKYRC E6


TABLE OF CONTENTS:
Post 1 – GENERAL DATA, TABLE OF CONTENTS, PROS, CONS
Post 2 – UNBOXING
Post 3 – GENERAL IMPRESSIONS
Post 4 – ASSEMBLY
Post 5 – FLIGHT PERFORMANCE
Post 6 - TRANSMITTER and RECEIVER
Post 7 - BATTERY and CHARGER
Post 8 - My OPINION and RECOMMENDATIONS

PROS:
The overall appearance is of a well-designed and good looking airplane. The high rear-mounted motor means never having to change a prop, we hope. It has a terrific rate of climb. The clevis on the rudder is a nice touch. For those wanting to customize the look of their plane, this one comes with no decals applied. The size is terrific, making it easy for someone like me with old eyes to see at a distance. Once in a glide attitude, this plane is easy to fly.

CONS:
The assembly directions are severely lacking. The LG are weak and its attachment point is not adequate for landings other than near perfect landings on a smooth hard surface. Although the Hawk Sky V2 comes with all of the parts needed to fly, it is far from RTF. It requires more assembly than most RTF models I have put together. It requires installation of the elevator & rudder control horns & landing gear as well as the application of decals. The 2 halves of the fuselage required additional bonding in the nose area after a less than ideal launch. The 2 halves of the wing are hard to bring together due to the tightness of the CF spar. There is no skid plate or wheel to minimize damage for belly landings. A center nose wheel would be helpful to at least land on grass. I ended up doing the review with a FlySky Tx and Rx due to receipt of a DOA Dynam Tx and a 2nd DOA Dynam Tx. I would not recommend the RTF version - only the PNP version.

Other reviews I have done are below.

1. FMS Super EZ RTF
The RCGs review of the FMS Super EZ RTF version is here.
The product link is here.

2. XK A1200 1200mm wingspan RTF
The RCGs review for the XK A1200 1200mm wingspan RTF airplane glider is here.
The product link is here.

3. Halloween 1031 RTF Quadcopter
The RCGs review of the Halloween 1031 RTF Quadcopter with blinking lights is is here.
The product link is here.

4. WL Toys F959 glider
The RCGs review of WL Toys F959 glider is here.
The product link is here.

5. Dynam Cessna C-188
The RCGs Dynam Cessna C-188 RC review link is here.
The product link is here.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I have also created a DATA REFERENCE SOURCE at RCGs for the following models.

WL Toys V913 Fixed Pitch helicopter HERE.

E-flite 1.2M Spitfire with SAFE HERE.

FMS 1400mm P-40B Warhawk HERE.

Dynam Cessna 188 AGwagon Crop Duster HERE.
Last edited by hifinsword; May 18, 2017 at 03:44 AM.
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Oct 13, 2016, 04:18 AM
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Unboxing


UNBOXING:
The Hawk Sky V2 came double-boxed. There was no damage to either the inner box or the plane.

There are 2 major boxes inside the box it comes in and a spacer box for cushioning. One box contains most of the hardware and other pieces to assemble the plane such as LG & the prop. The other box contains the Transmitter (Tx).

The fuselage, tail feathers & wing are disassembled and held in other compartments in the box.
Last edited by hifinsword; Oct 13, 2016 at 06:39 AM.
Oct 13, 2016, 04:35 AM
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General impressions


APPEARANCE:
If you prefer to customize your aircraft, this is the ideal platform to do just that. It comes without any decals applied. It is white EPO foam so it can be painted or decaled to your own design. The decals pictured below are the ones that come with it. There appear to be lots of little parts in bags.

Although you can fly it with or without the LG, I would classify it as a Hand-Launched-Glider or HLG. Unless you have access to a paved runway, you will probably not fly with the LG. Even with access to a paved runway, flying without LG will help with flight times.

CONTROL:
The manufacturer says control can be maintained at 1000 meters. That is beyond my capability to see the plane’s orientation. This is a full-range Tx/Rx system, but unfortunately I would not get to try it out. It was DOA. Once I had a comparable system (FlySky) installed, I was easily able to control the airplane out to the limits of my eyesight. I did not attempt to control beyond my Line of Sight (LOS). Doing so is not compliant with the Academy of Model Aeronautics (AMA) National Model Aircraft Safety Code, document 105 paragraph B. 9(a), which as a member, I follow. Link here http://www.modelaircraft.org/files/105.pdf

If flying FPV I would also follow AMA document 550, “Unmanned Aircraft Operation Utilizing First-Person View”. Link here http://www.modelaircraft.org/files/550.pdf LOS must be maintained at all times.

BATTERY: The stock battery is a Dynam 2200mAh 3S 20C LiPo with a Deans power connector. The general stats say it has a 25C rating but the actual battery displays a 20C rating. It weighs 181.2g.

TRANSPORT:
This is larger than most of the aircraft I fly and carry in my Honda CRV. When I do transport larger aircraft, I remove the wings. That was not the case with this Hawk Sky V2 on the first few flights. Breaking it down for transport would be difficult until I can loosen the wing spar quite a bit. It does not slide in easily. This HLG uses traditional servos connectors and I’m not so sure the servo wire connectors would survive repeated disconnecting and reconnecting.

VENDOR SUPPORT:
I found the included Dynam transmitter (Tx) defective or dead on arrival (DOA). It would not turn on. Once I relayed this to GearBest, I was notified a new Tx would be shipped to me. GearBest does not carry a separate Dynam transmitter (Tx) or receiver (Rx) so it was decided I would receive a FlySky (FS) 6Ch Tx & Rx instead. I was notified the Tx/Rx was shipped on 10/8/2016 via DHL. It arrived 10/11/2016. A week later, to my surprise, a 2nd Dynam Tx was received and was also found to be DOA. GearBest tried, but Dynam failed them. I cannot recommend the RTF version of the Hawk Sky V2.

EDIT: As it turns out, the battery tray that comes with the Tx is what was defective. Eventually I was able to get a battery tray that worked with both of the Txs.

MANUFACTURER QUALITY & DESIGN:
Dynam is the manufacturer of the Hawk Sky V2. I had problems with Dynam's hard plastic control horns in the past. The plastic breaks when compressed too much by a quick connect. It’s hard to determine what is too much. I have no reason to believe I would not have the same problem with the quick connector pre-installed on the elevator (ELE) control horn of this Hawk Sky V2. So I chose to move the quick connect on the HS V2 ELE control horn to the nylon ELE servo arm. In short I removed the control rod from the fuselage and reversed it, i.e. swapped ends. The Z-bend ended up on the elevator control horn and the quick connect ended up on the Nylon servo control arm.

The top part of the nose of the HS V2 split in what could be called a hard landing during an attempted launch. The mid seam had been held together by a soft glue similar to Foam-Tac. I repaired it using epoxy mixed with micro balloons. The micro balloons are for strength and help hide the color of the cured epoxy. I reinforced the repair with clear packing tape (CPT) across the mid seam. It held the halves together during the cure. I also wrapped the bottom section of the nose and the forward part of the belly with CPT to provide a reinforced belly surface for grass belly landings.

A rectangular hole in the nose section of the belly is there I assume for cooling the ESC, Rx and battery. But it also provides an entry for dead grass or dirt on belly landings. This is not a good design. Either a plastic plate or an embedded nose-wheel like the AK A1200 would be a better design. The nose wheel cavity on the XK A1200 does not go into the battery bay. I reviewed it here. It does not allow dirt to enter inside the plane. I cut out the tape covering the rectangular hole on the HS V2 that was covered by the CPT, for good ventilation, but wonder if it should be covered to keep the dirt out. If you are only gliding rather than using the motor constantly for powered flight, the plane may not need the cooling vent opened. Higher vents cut out in the cheeks may be a better option?
Last edited by hifinsword; May 18, 2017 at 03:49 AM.
Oct 13, 2016, 04:48 AM
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Assembly


DECALS:
Step 1 in the directions was to glue the tail feathers to the fuselage. It comes with several tubes of glue. Some are CA and some are contact cement. I decided to put the decals on first before gluing on the tailfeathers. Prior experience told me it would be easier to do with the plane still in pieces. It took me 50 minutes to complete putting all of the decals on, and that included wiping down the surfaces with rubbing alcohol to remove any manufacturing residue left on the surface.

GENERAL INFO ON CONTROL HORNS:
The 4 fine thread 2mm screws for attaching the control horns to the elevator and rudder come in 2 lengths. You may need to poke the foam out of the 2 holes for each of the control horns. The longer screws go in the thicker part of the control surface, the most forward part of the control horn and its matching backing plate. I added some contact cement under the plates to feel more secure with their attachment. In the past have had some screws back out after the time and vibration of flight has loosened them up. Longer screws with Nylocks would be even more secure but maybe overkill for now. My experience with Dynam control horns has not been good so a change was in order for the elevator control horn.

ELEVATOR CONTROL HORNS/ROD & SERVO ARMS:
The directions are minimal. A beginner would have a tough time getting it right. The elevator control rod is the rod exiting dead center in the rear of the fuselage. I decided to move the quick connector that was already assembled on the elevator control horn for 2 reasons.

Reason 1. My experience with Dynam control horns revealed they are not good candidates for tightening something to them very tightly. The plastic cracks very easily. Since the servo control arm is nylon, a much tougher material, it would make sense to swap the ends of the rod and use the quick connector on a tougher material.

Reason 2. There is a hole on the left side of the tail part of the fuselage for tightening the quick connect screw, but itís hard to apply any force without holding the quick connect at the same time. It looked like it might be hard to adjust once the elevator was glued to the fuselage.

I removed the quick connector and moved it to the elevator servo arm up forward. That required swapping ends on the elevator control rod. After removing the servo control arm, I slid it forward out of the fuselage. I reinserted it with the straight end going into the plastic sheath from the tail end, and slid it forward to the servo arm where it could be attached using the quick connector.

Step 2 in the directions is attaching the control horns. Before doing this step I had to drill out the outer hole of the ELE control arm a little bit in order to get the quick connect into the ELE control arm outer hole. Once the quick connect is screwed into the control arm, the 2mm nut goes on the back of the quick connect where the screw part exits. I decided to replace that nut with a 2mm locknut or Nylock. I put it on with the nylon insert part of the nut down, or closest to the horn, rather than the normal way. The screw end is so short you need the nylon insert in the nut grabbing the screw immediately, rather than after the metal part of the nut is almost all of the way on.

RUDDER CONTROL HORNS/ROD SERVO ARMS:
The control rod for the rudder comes out of the tail section and up and to the right of the vertical stabilizer. It uses a clevis to attach to the rudder control horn so there is no need to worry about cracking the plastic control horn. The hole in the one side of the clevis is not completely through and may stop the clevis pin from completely engaging. Make sure the clevis pin hole is clear and that the clevis is tight on the control horn. A clevis keeper (fuel line or heat shrink) is recommended if it does not feel secure. No clevis keeper was provided.

GLUING THE TAILFEATHERS:
I used the included contact cement to glue the horizontal and vertical stabilizers to the fuselage. The directions on this are fairly straightforward. You could use the included medium CA or your own preference of glues.

INSTALLING THE PROP:
My pictures are self-explanatory. Again, the included directions are lacking here. The propeller backing plate slides over the hex nut on the shaft. Make sure the nut is inside the hex-shaped recess of the backing plate. I put a washer on the shaft next. It could be an extra washer, and you could leave it off, but there are no directions to indicate it. My experience is that there should be a washer here. The prop goes on the shaft with the front edges of the prop against the longer plastic screw mounts on the backing plate. Another washer goes in front of the prop. The Nylock nut goes over the entire assembly. The spinner goes on next, held on by 2 small self-threading screws.

LANDING GEAR (LG):
Unless you are able to fly off very short grass or a paved surface, you will most likely want to remove the LG and belly land this plane. The field where I fly keeps the grass at 1.25 inches. Even at that short length, the small wheels grab the grass and rip the entire LG and plastic gear holder off the airplane. This happened to my Hawk Sky V2 on its first landing on grass. As previously mentioned, I added CPT to the front third of the belly and the entire nose area to minimize damage to the area when belly landing.

WEIGHT:
The empty weight of the plane without LG is 594g. The LG weighs 26.9g. Empty weight with LG would be 621g. With the stock battery at 181.2g, the flying weight is about 775g without LG. Total weight with LG would be 802g. All figures are measured numbers with a digital scale. There may be a few extra grams of tape on the nose of the plane and some Foam-2-foam glue on the control horn plates that would not be on a fresh plane out of the box.
Last edited by hifinsword; Oct 14, 2016 at 10:08 AM.
Oct 13, 2016, 04:51 AM
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Flight performance


CENTER OF GRAVITY (CG):
The advertising general data recommends a CG of 58-62mm aft of the wing’s LE. The document that comes with the plane shows a drawing with a CG of 50-55mm AFT OF THE COCKPIT’S REAR EDGE. THAT’S WRONG! If you place the stock battery as far forward as possible in the batt bay, the CG is 55mm aft of the LE, not the aft portion of the cockpit. That is the most aft limit of the recommended CG per the drawing. The plane will fly at that CG but shows a nose-heavy tendency. That makes sense, since that CG is also forward of the 58-62mm recommended CG in the GENERAL DATA published.

MAIDEN FLIGHT:
The maiden flight was with the battery as far forward as possible in the nose with the CG at 55mm aft of the wing’s LE. The plane was very flyable but there was some slight porpoising in flight once power was off, reducing glide time. I moved the battery so its rear edge was in-line with the rear edge of the Velcro patch on the battery tray. In that position the CG measures 63mm. That is where I was able to get the best glide performance with some UP ELE. With the battery placed aft of the Velcro patch on the battery tray, the CG comes out slightly tail heavy, and the plane becomes harder to control under power but glides well with some UP ELE.

From my BLOG Link HERE:

“The manufacturer's recommended Center of Gravity (CG) is a good starting point, not the ending point. You don't pick a CG point and make it balance there. You balance your plane and find out where that point is. The "ideal CG" is that CG which achieves hands-off straight and level flight with no trim to the control surfaces.”

LAUNCHING:
If you have a level paved or hard-packed surface, this plane will take off easily with the supplied LG. I had no problem on takeoff on the maiden flight from a sidewalk in the local park. Even though there is no tailwheel steering, the rudder handles yaw well.

Hand-launching is another option and skill altogether. I much prefer a rolling takeoff. Hand-launching my other planes only requires some throttle and a soft pitch almost parallel to the ground. But they are ultra micro and micro planes. This plane requires a hard toss at an angle of at least 30 degrees and if you can manage it, an even higher angle. A change to a more aft CG will help. My first toss was a low angle pitch that ended on the ground with the LG ripped out. I thought I just needed more power so I went WOT on the next toss. The result was another ground impact, with the nose split at the top. The repair was easily done with some epoxy and CPT. I’ve now perfected hand-launching planes of this size.

EDIT in blue font: After 2 failures I learned from my mistakes. I decided I had to both, 1) really put some muscle into it and 2) launch with the THR wide open. I also max'd out the UP ELE trim using the FS Tx. With my Spektrum Tx and Orange Rx I added a MIX with UP ELE to GEAR down MIX. If you're used to bringing up retracts, flipping the GEAR switch after getting airborne brings the ELE back to normal. It doesn't matter that this bird doesn't have retracts. The mix still works. The 3rd launch took off and quickly found vertical.

Landing this plane in grass is no problem. Because of its tendency to glide easily, approach speeds can be high. Unless you are using an aft CG in the low 60mm range, and are skilled enough to bleed off speed prior to touchdown, the Hawk Sky V2 will be difficult to land on a paved surface for a beginner pilot. Regardless of whether you hand-launch or do a ROG, DO NOT LAND IN GRASS with the LG attached!

RATE OF CLIMB:
My previous experience with gliders is a WL Toys F959 micro glider and the XK A1200 1200mm wingspan RTF airplane glider. The XK A1200 review is here. I am not an expert glider pilot, but this is not a high performance glider either. But the wings are very high lift and the plane has a low wing loading. At wide open throttle (WOT) with a 2200mAh 3S LiPo, this plane climbs almost straight up like a banshee. It's very impressive!

After a couple of flights, I have most of the wrinkles ironed out and was able to get almost 19 mins on a flight while using the battery only 4.9mins. The voltage was 11.37V so there is probably at least 1 more minute of runtime on the battery, and several more minutes of glide time. And I’m a beginner glider pilot. I am sure a better glider pilot could wring quite a bit more out of this plane.

STABILITY:
With the plane properly balanced, the plane will do most basic aerobatics such as rolls and loops. It handles inverted flight very easily. With a CG at the recommended 55mm, the HS V2 very maneuverable under power. With power off and gliding, you will find it diving. A forward CG will limit the HS V2’s ability to loop from without some speed. With an aft CG it will loop from straight and level flight without a hitch. I recommend placing the battery as far aft as possible unless you have some UP ELE trim or a mix for UP ELE. Without UP ELE trim, more weight added to the tail would give you the best attitude for the gliding, but I have decided not to add weight. I’d rather use the trim.

Gliding was easiest once the plane has slowed down to its terminal speed without power. The best gliding attitude was with the battery aft for a CG close to 63mm. You may need with some UP ELE. Prior to the slowdown, the plane will exhibit some porpoising but that will go away once the terminal speed is reached.

BEST GLIDE ATTITUDE:
The best glide attitude was with the CG in the low to mid 60mm range. That equates to the battery being just forward of the servo tray. There is a slot in the wooden tray that holds the servos and battery. Put the battery just in front of that slot and you should need very little or no UP ELE trim for the best gliding profile.
Last edited by hifinsword; Nov 14, 2016 at 05:32 AM.
Oct 13, 2016, 05:02 AM
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TRANSMITTER and RECEIVER


DYNAM Tx & Rx:
The included Tx and Rx were Dynam. But due to the Tx being DOA, a 4Ch basic FlySky (FS) Tx and a 6Ch Rx were sent to me and used.

WARNING: I also own a 6 Ch FS Tx. I decided to try it with the HawkSky V2. But the ELE channel was incorrect. So I went into the Tx settings to reverse it. Although I know the channel sequence is AETR for Futaba-based protocols like FS, I had TAER (DSMX/Spektrum) on my mind when I reversed channel 3 instead of channel 2! Immediately the plane went full throttle. Luckily it was secured and nothing was near the prop. So it didn't go anywhere or hurt anyone. I also quickly moved the throttle full up and the throttle was off. ALWAYS make sure your plane is secured when reversing channels. If you're on the THROTTLE channel, this is what can happen.

FLYSKY Tx & Rx:
The FS Tx & Rx came with the FMS Super EZ which I reviewed here.

BINDING THE FlySky Tx with the FS Rx:
In order to bind the FS Tx to the FS Rx, you would think you would add a bind pin, power the Rx, push the bind button on the Tx and power it on. This is how I do it with my Spektrum/DSMX gear. After trying this a few times and getting nowhere, I decided to try a procedure I had seen at the field with another pilot using a Futaba system. He moved both sticks IN & DOWN. VOILA! That's what it took to bind my FS system. Maybe the BIND button is supposed to work on the FS Tx, but I couldn't get it to work. Maybe someone reading this can clue me in on how to use it.

ELEVATOR UP TRIM:
With the basic FS Tx & Rx, I started testing by using an UP ELE mechanical trim of about 15-20 degrees. The battery was as far forward as possible with a CG of 55mm. With this CG placement, you will need constant aft ELE stick for gliding. If you are maneuvering, a forward CG without any ELE trim is fine. I then moved the CG aft to 63mm by placing the battery where the batt was inline with the Velcro or the hole aft of that. With a CG in the low to mid 60mm range, you can glide the HS V2 much better than with a CG of 55mm. A small amount of UP TRIM may help. Mine was either no deflection of the ELE, or the thickness of the trailing edge of the ELE foam surface, about 3mm UP ELE deflection with an aft CG in the low to mid 60s.

SPEKTRUM Tx & ORANGE Rx:
In order to use my computerized Spektrum Tx, I installed an Orange 6Ch Rx. I don’t own a 4Ch Rx but you could use one if you desired. I set up a GEAR > ELE mix to take advantage of the mixes that are not available with a basic Tx.
Last edited by hifinsword; Nov 14, 2016 at 05:42 AM.
Oct 13, 2016, 05:41 AM
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My OPINION and RECOMMENDATIONS


MY OPINIONS:
Is this a beginner's plane? I debated whether or not to post this in the Powered Glider forum or here in the Beginner's Airplane forum. I decided this is indeed an easy plane to fly - easy enough for a beginner to start with as a first plane.

But it is not without its foibles. A beginner may need some help hand-launching. The manual is devoid of much instruction. The assembly may not be that easy for someone without some intuition of what goes where and how. Hopefully posts and threads like this one will assist newbies get their Hawk Sky V2 airborne and flying without much trouble.

A beginner will need to know to adjust the CG and do some trimming on the ELE for an easier flight. Without it the plane will tend to nose-dive. Other options such as trimming the motor with more down-thrust were not explored but are possibilities.

RECOMMENDATIONS:
If you know you want to continue in this hobby, I recommend buying the PNP version at GearBest and supplying a better Tx and Rx that has the ability for dual rates, expo and some mixing for some selectable up elevator trim.

If you are unsure about continuing in this hobby, get the Hawk Sky V2 RTF version and follow the recommendations on CG. A basic Tx and Rx will work well for this 4Ch hand-launched glider if you have the CG in the 60-63mm range.
Last edited by hifinsword; Oct 14, 2016 at 10:33 AM.
Oct 13, 2016, 07:08 AM
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Can anyone comment on using a FlySky Tx and the binding sequence? This is in reference to my comments in POST 6 above.
Don
Last edited by hifinsword; Nov 14, 2016 at 05:52 AM.
Oct 17, 2016, 11:28 AM
pull up -- PULL UP!!!
Good review -- one nit: Under Launching you described two hand-launch failures. And immediately followed with the comment you've perfected the technique. Seems like you kinda quickly got from A to B, without what's in between.

My V1 HawkSky launches well at full throttle, high angle toss, aided by extra elevator reflex put in using DX6 Flight Modes. Once aloft, I switch off the extra elevator trim. Prior, it used to swoop low upon release.
Oct 17, 2016, 03:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hard line
Good review -- one nit: Under Launching you described two hand-launch failures. And immediately followed with the comment you've perfected the technique. Seems like you kinda quickly got from A to B, without what's in between.

My V1 HawkSky launches well at full throttle, high angle toss, aided by extra elevator reflex put in using DX6 Flight Modes. Once aloft, I switch off the extra elevator trim. Prior, it used to swoop low upon release.
Thanks for pointing that out, and for your comments. Let's just say I am a fast learner. It only took 2 failures with a somewhat wimpy toss, to realize I really had to toss the Sky Hawk hard and with some up angle. And the THR had to be wide-open. After a few more successful flights I realize it doesn't have to be as hard and high as I was tossing it. But for a beginner hand-tosser, like me, with a few more tosses, I can get airborne without overdoing it with the real hard toss. My advice to someone new to hand-tossing, is to really give a good hard toss at an UP angle, and at WOT. You can dial it back as you gain experience. I added an EDIT in that post to try and clarify the launch.
Don
Last edited by hifinsword; Oct 17, 2016 at 04:21 PM.
Oct 22, 2016, 08:03 AM
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The Hawk Sky V2 was my first plane. I actually have two of them. I probably have 50 flights on them, give or take. In no particular order, some thoughts.

For the most part, extremely forgiving flight characteristics, thanks to Bixler-ish design. So much so, that I believe this to be a far better value than the often touted and highly respected Apprentice as a first plane.

At half throttle and trimmed out, it tracks well and feels intuitive even to an inexperienced pilot. Design is somewhat self-righting.

Its very floaty. So much so that I usually chop the throttle prior to last turn for FA. Lots of wing surface and zero throttle is required for flair prior to touch down.

As with any gliderish design, it can be more than a handful in gusty conditions. I flew mine twice yesterday in 10 MPH with gusts to 20 MPH and I felt like someone handed me an ill-handling 3D plane. Had to really fly this thing with lots of down elevator due to gusts to stave off severe climbing. Had the surprise of my life when it caught a heavy gust turning in to the wind and the plane snapped inverted. Through a miracle, I just moved through the roll and continued to fly like I did it on purpose. My flying buddy gave me some serious side eyes! (As info, I intentionally put it up twice in questionable flying conditions to work on my piloting skills in non-bluebird weather. I knew I was pushing it and accepted the risks.)

The biggest fault with this plane is the landing gear. I think the wire used is from the same material as the cheap white clothing hangers. I dislike the landing gear so much that I have stripped it from one of the Hawk Skys and hand launch.

I don't know if there is an RC plane out there that can take a bigger beating than this plane. I have cart wheeled it a number of times. I crashed it in to a dead tree at speed and then helped the land owner chop the tree down to get the plane back. I have landed it on my friends roof, only to have it nose off in to the ground. I corkscrewed it to the ground at speed after losing orientation and making poor stick choices. And more nose overs than I can count. Setting aside a myriad of dents and dings, I have had to repair an aileron and dealt with the horrid landing gear more times than I can count. I'll address landing gear separately.

In summary, this is a fantastic trainer and also a sound platform for dipping one's toe in to vids and or FPV. It tracks well taking off (if you keep a sharp eye on your landing gear. It floats landings which will initially cause beginners to overshoot landings (hence my roof landing). But that floatiness allows extra time for the new pilot to make intelligent stick decisions, instilling confidence.

Finally, the PNP version can be had for right around 100.00 shipped right now. That is an incredible value in my eyes.
Nov 14, 2016, 05:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoomie517
The Hawk Sky V2 was my first plane. I actually have two of them. I probably have 50 flights on them, give or take. In no particular order, some thoughts.

For the most part, extremely forgiving flight characteristics, thanks to Bixler-ish design. So much so, that I believe this to be a far better value than the often touted and highly respected Apprentice as a first plane.

At half throttle and trimmed out, it tracks well and feels intuitive even to an inexperienced pilot. Design is somewhat self-righting.

Its very floaty. So much so that I usually chop the throttle prior to last turn for FA. Lots of wing surface and zero throttle is required for flair prior to touch down.

As with any gliderish design, it can be more than a handful in gusty conditions. I flew mine twice yesterday in 10 MPH with gusts to 20 MPH and I felt like someone handed me an ill-handling 3D plane. Had to really fly this thing with lots of down elevator due to gusts to stave off severe climbing. Had the surprise of my life when it caught a heavy gust turning in to the wind and the plane snapped inverted. Through a miracle, I just moved through the roll and continued to fly like I did it on purpose. My flying buddy gave me some serious side eyes! (As info, I intentionally put it up twice in questionable flying conditions to work on my piloting skills in non-bluebird weather. I knew I was pushing it and accepted the risks.)

The biggest fault with this plane is the landing gear. I think the wire used is from the same material as the cheap white clothing hangers. I dislike the landing gear so much that I have stripped it from one of the Hawk Skys and hand launch.

I don't know if there is an RC plane out there that can take a bigger beating than this plane. I have cart wheeled it a number of times. I crashed it in to a dead tree at speed and then helped the land owner chop the tree down to get the plane back. I have landed it on my friends roof, only to have it nose off in to the ground. I corkscrewed it to the ground at speed after losing orientation and making poor stick choices. And more nose overs than I can count. Setting aside a myriad of dents and dings, I have had to repair an aileron and dealt with the horrid landing gear more times than I can count. I'll address landing gear separately.

In summary, this is a fantastic trainer and also a sound platform for dipping one's toe in to vids and or FPV. It tracks well taking off (if you keep a sharp eye on your landing gear. It floats landings which will initially cause beginners to overshoot landings (hence my roof landing). But that floatiness allows extra time for the new pilot to make intelligent stick decisions, instilling confidence.

Finally, the PNP version can be had for right around 100.00 shipped right now. That is an incredible value in my eyes.
I agree with you. This plane can take a beating. If you're going to use the LG, it needs reinforcement. It's probably easier for a beginner to stay with hand-launching though. It does self-right, a plus for a beginner. A beginner needs lots of space to land. Until they get comfortable slowing it down at the right time, they will most likely overshoot. What I really like about it is the size. This is a lot of plane for the money! And at just over $100 for the PNP, a good plane for a beginner, or anyone.
Don
Dec 13, 2016, 11:44 PM
Registered User
Kingbird49's Avatar
I'm helping a buddy build one of these. It's his first plane and my second Dynam plane. We're having trouble getting the wing spar to slide into the holes provided in the wings. Don't want to force and ultimately break anything. Has this come up in any of your builds? Is there a foam-safe lubricant we can spread on the spar to help it slide into the wings? Thanks for any insight you might have on this.

Cheers!
Doug
Dec 14, 2016, 01:20 PM
Blue Skies
hifinsword's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kingbird49
I'm helping a buddy build one of these. It's his first plane and my second Dynam plane. We're having trouble getting the wing spar to slide into the holes provided in the wings. Don't want to force and ultimately break anything. Has this come up in any of your builds? Is there a foam-safe lubricant we can spread on the spar to help it slide into the wings? Thanks for any insight you might have on this.

Cheers!
Doug
Mine was a tight fit as well. What I did was twist the tube and try to cut a mm or 2 into the end of the spar hole. Don't put too much pressure on it but enough to cut in a little as you twist. It was enough to seat the tube all the way in. I didn't need any lubricant but talcum powder would be better than a liquid lubricant if you need something. If you have a brass or aluminum tube the same size diameter, it would be easy to sharpen the end from the inside with a round file and cut out the hole a little more. I didn't have anything like that but that's a very effective way to cut foam. You can also sharpen the inside edge of the stock spar with a half round or round file but don't overdo it. The sharp edge will cut quickly. Hope this helps.
Good luck Doug,
Don


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