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Oct 13, 2016, 01:14 AM
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First try at making a paneled sail...


It didn't come apart, so it was a good day!

Did a lot of reading and studying photos before giving it a go. I tend to work too fast on projects and have a short attention span. But I forced myself to take my time.

I started with just making a jib. After practicing joining seams on a couple of smaller panels, I set up up a Swede Johnson sail block and got to work. I had downloaded Swede's instructions for using a sail block and decided on my camber percentage. The highest point on the sail block was marked for lining up the camber measurements.

Once the panels were joined I trimmed the jib with my template. Next was applying the luff tape, then corner fingers and grommets. Doing it all neatly without any little creases was a major PITA.

The boat sailed the same as before as far as I could tell. Sail Points next month will be the real test. My respect for sailmakers like Brad Gibson and all of the others is even higher now. It takes a lot of patience and focus that isn't easy for me.
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Oct 13, 2016, 08:28 AM
W Kuhns
BillKuhn's Avatar
Bravo!!! Nice job. I don't have the Gump to try and make panel sails. One piece yes that panel thing is great. But to much precision for this old guy. Awesome!!!
Oct 13, 2016, 09:47 AM
Registered User
One thing I do to control draft on a swede block is to mark the center of the chamber then mark a location of my sail plan for that point to line up instead of the swede method of indexing the front of the sail. More repeatable as the front of the sail gets cut off.

I use between 3 and 3.5" from the leading edge of the sail to the block high point. This is marked on the sail plan and the seam. Then when you have the oversized sheet with seams in it, line the marks up with the plan to ensure the chamber is lined up and at the depth you want.
Oct 13, 2016, 10:46 AM
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RCphotoguy's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by BillKuhn View Post
Bravo!!! Nice job. I don't have the Gump to try and make panel sails. One piece yes that panel thing is great. But to much precision for this old guy. Awesome!!!
Thank you!

Quote:
Originally Posted by slotracer577 View Post
One thing I do to control draft on a swede block is to mark the center of the chamber then mark a location of my sail plan for that point to line up instead of the swede method of indexing the front of the sail. More repeatable as the front of the sail gets cut off.

I use between 3 and 3.5" from the leading edge of the sail to the block high point. This is marked on the sail plan and the seam. Then when you have the oversized sheet with seams in it, line the marks up with the plan to ensure the chamber is lined up and at the depth you want.
Exactly... you described it better than I did.

"The highest point on the sail block was marked for lining up the camber measurements."
Oct 13, 2016, 10:47 AM
Registered User
Well, they certainly look the part. Well done! If you have pictures or more stories of your process, I'm sure other folks would like to see them.
Oct 13, 2016, 11:01 AM
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RCphotoguy's Avatar
Didn't take any pics with this one but did when I posted my single panel sails.

I'll post build pics when I make the next sail.

From another thread...

See attached photos with descriptions.

This video gave me some ideas on how to set things up etc. Building starts after about 25 sec.

Construcción paso a paso Velas para veleros de radio control (7 min 12 sec)
Last edited by RCphotoguy; Oct 15, 2016 at 11:33 AM.
Oct 13, 2016, 12:22 PM
Registered User
I salute your creativity and self reliance!
Oct 14, 2016, 02:29 AM
Registered User
VERY GOOD job! And thank you for posting that video too, it is perfect!

I am going to have to make up another set of sails for my RS540. While I don't "need" paneled sails, I do need better supplies. And will likely pick up a sail block along with my other bits.

Making up a Footy or three next. Promised my Mom one. But sometime soon, I think I will start building a larger boat...
Oct 14, 2016, 06:08 PM
Registered User
A question, where did you get your sail block? I can't find many choices. Brighton Boat Works seems to be the only place. Is it something that could "reasonably" be made up even?
Oct 14, 2016, 06:50 PM
Registered User
Here are some sail block links - making a sail block. And also making sails.

http://documentslide.com/documents/s...-to-vol-1.html
just scroll down in the window to see the book’s pages

http://home.mindspring.com/~pmyc100/Sailmaking.htm
http://home.mindspring.com/~pmyc100/Camberboard.htm

Scott
Oct 14, 2016, 06:58 PM
a.k.a. Bob Parks
Looks like something that could be made of foam with a hot wire cutter and a couple of templates. If the surface needs to be tough, a light fiberglass layer would do it.

BP
Oct 14, 2016, 07:48 PM
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RCphotoguy's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by BiggsDarkLighter View Post
A question, where did you get your sail block? I can't find many choices. Brighton Boat Works seems to be the only place. Is it something that could "reasonably" be made up even?
I ordered mine from here (link attached), and with the exchange rate, I got a 30% discount. Plus they say a $35 flate rate for shipping orders, but that is always adjusted to the actual cost in the final invoice (and it's almost always a lot less for parts orders).

http://www.radiosailingshop.com.au/i...roducts_id=891
Oct 15, 2016, 12:28 AM
Registered User
THANK YOU!!! That was actually the version I was looking for too! Went through checkout, and it would only be $50 plus shipping, whatever that ends up being... Can't do it right now, but they have a few other bits I had been eyballing anyways.

Some REALLY good links above too! Kinda a tossup between free materials and lots of effort, or already made but not super cheap.
Mar 20, 2017, 02:01 AM
Basil

Making and trimming a panel sail


I've described how I made my first two panelled sails using cardboard, a glue gun and an Xacto knife at:

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...lorer-Affinity

Working in an apartment in Paris doesn't allow me to get into shaping wood etc. What's more, I don't see the advantage of a sail block over my "one off mould" approach. With the mould, I can control the shape of every square inch of the sail.

Could someone discuss the relative merits of the two approaches? I think the sail block is faster than the one off mould approach.

Then, when my sail is made, its shape is pretty much inalterable. It's "coooked in" (dimensions, maximum camber, distribution of cambers, twist, number of panels). Pulling on any of the three corners will only create a crease somewhere on the sail. (I use Mylar.)

The resulting sail is ideal for a certain wind speed/gust condition and decreasingly so for others. If I have enough sails, I can use the one that's best adapted to the day's wind/gusts.

Could someone also discuss the relative merits of a suit of inalterable sails as to a single trimmable one?
Mar 20, 2017, 03:29 AM
Basil

From art to procedure


My "home" group is:

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...lorer-Affinity

It seems to me that for a given:

- class of boats,
- wind speed,
-gust conditions,

one can consider discussing the ideal sail shape and material. Not every one will agree on the ideal, but the range of discussion can be considerably narrowed (a given wind speed/gusts condition) and couched in terms of specific parameters (maximum camber position, twist, distribution of cambers, roach form, sail material).

One can then imagine a table with the dimensions wind speed x gust conditions, where each cell would contain the values of the parameters.

Within this framework, one could then discuss the specific adjustments (trim) necessary to a given sail planform (one cell of the table) to optimise performance for conditions that range above and below those of the cell, e.g; "wind = + 1 mph, gust condition midway between "average" and "strong"."

This would result in specific repeatable parameters. It would free the sail trimmer from re-inventing the wheel (and probably re-inventing different wheels each time) for a given wind speed x gust condition.

One advantage of this would be place the full burden of performance on the helmsman.

I have an RG65. I wonder if someone has already done this.

What do you think of this idea?


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