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Sep 24, 2021, 10:58 PM
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scott page's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Too Many Toys
I often use Auto Level for the entire flight (except on Launch) as it can turn a 1.6m Bixler into a high performance 2m+ Glider on the right day.
In fact I've out flown a Phoenix 2000 or ASW on an average/fair day more than a few times.
And just for kicks, I'll come in at 50 or 60 feet, park it in the sky like a kite, then try a completely vertical landing, only creeping a few meters forward.
You need a bit of a breeze to do it. My mates laugh "a wannabe Heli Pilot" they say. It can take 2 or 3 mins to land sometimes.
Ok -- I'll admit HERE that I've done that too - -but I'll never admit to my flying buddies. Ya -- the AL is pretty amazing at making a mediocre glider into a pretty fantastic glider when the thermals are booming. However I would NEVER recommend somebody use AL to "learn to fly" - nor would I teach them that way.

BUT

I did set up a trainer so that the AL is switched on when both sticks are centered and stabilize is active when they are more +/- 5 from center. This way the student can drop the sticks in emergency and the plane will autolevel. The secret to making this work is they have to be taught to trust the transmitter to save them and drop the sticks. If they fight it they may fight it into the ground.
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Sep 25, 2021, 07:50 AM
Registered User
pilotpete2's Avatar
I have to confess that I was somewhat dismissive of stabilization until I tried a S6R in a seaplane, now I'm hooked!
I do have one question regarding positioning a stabilized receiver. Would mounting the rx off the centerline of the fuse be an issue, say mounting it to the side of the fuselage?
Sep 25, 2021, 08:36 AM
Registered User
Josef086's Avatar
I have one in a Eflight Twin Otter. I have not tried it out on floats yet. I have flown around with it in AL and found it does what I want it to do as apposed to the SAFE RX that is normally found in the plane.
Sep 25, 2021, 08:40 AM
USA
d_wheel's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by pilotpete2
I have to confess that I was somewhat dismissive of stabilization until I tried a S6R in a seaplane, now I'm hooked!
I do have one question regarding positioning a stabilized receiver. Would mounting the rx off the centerline of the fuse be an issue, say mounting it to the side of the fuselage?
I don't think you will find a consensus on this question. It has been discussed for years in helicopter forums and no one, that I have seen, has come up with a concrete answer. I am in the group that believes that it makes little difference where the sensors are mounted. They could be mounted in the wing tip and still work fine. The gyros would only sense their orientation. The accelerometers will be affected by centrifugal forces, which increases as they are moved away from the center of rotation , but this is not significant in something as small as a model aircraft.

That being said, best practice is to always mount the stabilizer as close to the CG as possible.
Last edited by d_wheel; Sep 25, 2021 at 10:02 AM. Reason: Spelling
Sep 25, 2021, 09:18 AM
Registered User
pilotpete2's Avatar
My (ample) gut sez you're right
I'm going to try an Archer SR6 in a Crash Test hobbies Widowmaker. Putting the rx on the centerline may compromise the strength of the wing joint, so I was thinking of recessing it off center.
I'm in the process of getting a new to me Extreme Flight Vanquish ready. I did a really nice job with a receiver tray.....until I went to secure the wing bolts
This may be a situation where velcroing it to the fuselage side may practical
Sep 25, 2021, 11:49 AM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by scott page

I did set up a trainer so that the AL is switched on when both sticks are centered and stabilize is active when they are more +/- 5 from center.
That actually sounds really cool! Could you share your OTX settings for that pls??

Cheers, DSA
Sep 25, 2021, 12:42 PM
Ninja
ooOoo's Avatar
I have one plane I fly that I turned the AL gains way down in the LUA, like to 10 or 15. When I let the sticks to center the plane will slowly level out much like it would if I was flying it manually. I like that it doesnít jerk the plane to level. Seems like it would great for an FPV wing, which Iíll try some day.
Sep 25, 2021, 07:46 PM
Registered User
scott page's Avatar
Found a new use for Auto Level today. While a couple hours north at a regional float fly there was a bridge to a dock that looked too much like a limbo challenge. We all were tempted -- then I got the idea to enable auto level and flew under the bridge three times in a row. The bridge was about 5' high - too low to stand under.
Sep 25, 2021, 07:55 PM
Ninja
ooOoo's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by scott page
Found a new use for Auto Level today. While a couple hours north at a regional float fly there was a bridge to a dock that looked too much like a limbo challenge. We all were tempted -- then I got the idea to enable auto level and flew under the bridge three times in a row. The bridge was about 5' high - too low to stand under.
That looks like it was incredible fun!
Sep 25, 2021, 08:35 PM
Registered User
Josef086's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by d_wheel
I don't think you will find a consensus on this question. It has been discussed for years in helicopter forums and no one, that I have seen, has come up with a concrete answer. I am in the group that believes that it makes little difference where the sensors are mounted. They could be mounted in the wing tip and still work fine. The gyros would only sense their orientation. The accelerometers will be affected by centrifugal forces, which increases as they are moved away from the center of rotation , but this is not significant in something as small as a model aircraft.

That being said, best practice is to always mount the stabilizer as close to the CG as possible.
I think you need to get into a pretty big model plane before you can start to see the difference
Sep 27, 2021, 09:00 AM
Team WarpSquad [ L ] Learner
Too Many Toys's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by d_wheel
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I am in the group that believes that it makes little difference where the sensors are mounted. They could be mounted in the wing tip and still work fine.
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That being said, best practice is to always mount the stabilizer as close to the CG as possible.
The SXR itself will try to get the Plane exactly back to the orientation of where it was set during the Self Check.

So whatever piece of real estate anywhere on the plane you choose, Fuselage, Wing Tip, Tail, upside down inside
the Canopy the SXR will try to make it Level with the same Attitude set exactly as during the Self Check.
It shouldn't matter a great deal in most cases. On very fast planes with a high gain set you may get speed wobbles, lower the gain.
In the centre and @ CG is usually a good place to start.

Quad copters can act a little strange if their flight controller is offset too much, but remember those
motors are not only steering but keeping the aircraft airborne (lift) at the same time, dual tasked.

Yes Scott, way too much Fun, Stop it !


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