How to connect lead out lines to belcranks - RC Groups
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Sep 11, 2016, 05:12 PM
fix-n-fly
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How to connect lead out lines to belcranks


Hello - I am returning to control line flying after several decades. I have purchased a Brodak Lightning Streak kit Junior that I plan to make electric. I am having a little difficulty using the crimp method to attach lead out lines to bell crank and to eyelets.

Several questions:

1. How big should the outside loop should be on the thimble? Not looking for precise answer, but the one time I tried this the loop stood above the thimble about 3/16 to 1/4" and I am thinking this is still too much. Not sure about the leadout wire size provided in the kit.

2. Does anyone put CA glue in the compressed thimble and put heatshrink over the assembly?

3. What is the best tool to cut the braided lead out wire? I have a pair of wire cutters, but this leaves the wire splintered.

Any assistance is appreciated.
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Sep 11, 2016, 05:33 PM
Registered User
Bicycle cable cutters do a neat job of cutting braided cable with no fraying.
Like this: https://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Produc...2_124659_-1___
Sep 11, 2016, 06:19 PM
fix-n-fly
Thanks Gnu4FF - will take a look at this.
Sep 12, 2016, 04:26 AM
Diesel Danny
danny mz's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by fix-n-fly
Hello - I am returning to control line flying after several decades. I have purchased a Brodak Lightning Streak kit Junior that I plan to make electric. I am having a little difficulty using the crimp method to attach lead out lines to bell crank and to eyelets.

Several questions:

1. How big should the outside loop should be on the thimble? Not looking for precise answer, but the one time I tried this the loop stood above the thimble about 3/16 to 1/4" and I am thinking this is still too much. Not sure about the leadout wire size provided in the kit.

2. Does anyone put CA glue in the compressed thimble and put heatshrink over the assembly?

3. What is the best tool to cut the braided lead out wire? I have a pair of wire cutters, but this leaves the wire splintered.

Any assistance is appreciated.
Could you please provide a photo as I am not familiar with that kit but willing to help any C/L flyer.

* Danny M *
Sep 12, 2016, 09:14 AM
Registered User
StayQuiet's Avatar
You're not alone here. I'm getting back into CL flying after a long, LONG time, and I'm struggling with the line ends (especially trying to get two lines the same length) myself.

This is from a Brodak Flying Clown kit. I put a finish nail in a board to help keep tension. Fed the wire through the crimp sleeve per directions, and used a small set of needle nose to slide it tightly in place, then pulled the rest of the cable tight to eliminate the HUGE loop I was left with. Finally crimped the sleeve. I soldered the wire where it was going to be cut - NOT part of the end loop - and used a Dremel cutoff wheel, then wrapped it with wire wrap.

I botched the first set so badly I had to order more lead-out wire. I'm trying to develop a "jig" of some type to help me keep the lengths equal.
Sep 12, 2016, 11:06 AM
Registered User
Found this for something to watch
How to Wrap flying lines for Control Line models (10 min 46 sec)
It is not crimped, but something to watch. Some guys wrap them and use epoxy. Lately I have been crimping them and using some very thin 3/64" or so copper tubing for lines. Leadouts, I use downrigger line that is about .030". It does not solder well, it must be stainless. Either way, I get the wrap or crimp tube right up to the eyelet, and try to get two wraps on the eyelet if there is room. I also try to wrap the loose end back over to go through the wrap or eyelet again so it does not slip. For solid lines, I wrap them with copper wire from suitable stranded wires raided from stranded electrical cords. The diameter is smaller than some of the hobby shop types, and they are not really available everywhere. I give the solid wires a twist, making sure both wires have a twist so they lock together, rather than the loose end wrapping around. They don't slip so easily that way. I hate when that happens.
Sep 12, 2016, 11:15 AM
Morning Light Mountain
badbill's Avatar
I have been using this method for a while now. It is easy and quick, works great!

Bill Davenport
AMA 28141
Sep 12, 2016, 05:12 PM
fix-n-fly
All - thanks for the feedback. I have been looking at a video on Youtube which kind of shows what I am trying to do.
Making "Crimp" style leadouts for Control Line planes (12 min 13 sec)
. This is not too bad, but looping the leadout wire back through the thimble and trying to get as small as possible is a pain. I like the methods also from aspeed and badbill - will spend a little more time looking at these. I have already had to order more thimbles and leadout lines. Tower Hobbies seems to have the best online price as I am 60 miles away from a hobbyshop that carries this.
Last edited by fix-n-fly; Sep 12, 2016 at 05:14 PM. Reason: additional info
Sep 19, 2016, 01:57 PM
Registered User
If you are using crimping/swaging to secure the lines around the thimble, be sure to have the wire pass through the tube being crimped/swaged three times. This is per the AMA rules regarding termination of control lines. See page 8 here: http://www.modelaircraft.org/files/2...CLGeneral4.pdf
Dec 09, 2016, 07:47 AM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by D_Ryan
If you are using crimping/swaging to secure the lines around the thimble, be sure to have the wire pass through the tube being crimped/swaged three times. This is per the AMA rules regarding termination of control lines. See page 8 here: http://www.modelaircraft.org/files/2...CLGeneral4.pdf
I follow this AMA guide line too. I don't bank on CA for keeping line connections together.
Oct 21, 2017, 06:47 AM
Registered User
Hi,

Is this supposee to be used to attach control lines (thimble) to lead out lines and how does it work?
Oct 21, 2017, 10:17 AM
Now I have to land that thing?
PGregory's Avatar
The center metal sheath slides to either end to open the opposite end. On the clip, you have to depress the wire of the end to which you are sliding, there is a small detent in the sheath if you look at it closely. Doing this reveals the opposite wire end and you just slip it over the terminal of the leadout thimble. Then, fully slide the sheath the other direction on the clip , and connect the open clip to the thimble of your line. Close clip (center sheath), and you are ready.
If that isn't clear I will post a short video.

That clip you show looks like the small size clip. For the LS Jr. the thimbles will probably be "medium" and the little clips have a hard time making onto bigger thimbles, fyi.

For a little more info, see the thread I started just this week on a related topic, finding just the thimbles for terminating lines/leadouts HERE
As usual, other great info surfaces when you ask a question on RCGroups .

MBS was pointed out as another good place to source control line supplies.

I had to repair (and hence, shorten) a set of lines this past week and it is not hard to use the crimp method. I didn't need a jig, and any line-length adjustment can be done at the handle, if needed. This was on .015 lines.
Oct 21, 2017, 01:29 PM
Registered User
Thank you PGregory, just the information I were looking I did order a 0.012 control line kit from brodak and am currently building a sig akromaster to try c/l
Oct 22, 2017, 09:55 AM
Registered User
I usually do 3/4 of a turn over a nail to get the radius started and then the length is pretty close. Then when sliding the crimp tube and jiggling the lines, at least you know where you started. I got the 1000 ft spools from MBS. Great deal and a good guy that is into control line.
Oct 23, 2017, 11:42 AM
Registered User
Norm Furutani's Avatar
Like Gnu's recommendation, I prefer the bypass style cutter for both cable and small piano wire. Mine is the Xuron brand.

Norm


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