What percentage to use mixing aileron's and rudder? - RC Groups
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Sep 02, 2016, 09:07 PM
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Newbie1980's Avatar
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What percentage to use mixing aileron's and rudder?


Just upgraded from a DXE to a DX7.Wanting to know how much percentage of mixing to use with aileron's and rudder. Being a novice pilot should I even mess with mixing? My mini apprentice in beginner mode has a mix but intermediate and expert don't. Setting the expo seems to help . So figured I'd check in to mixing.
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Sep 02, 2016, 09:15 PM
High Lift Coefficient
Sailhigh's Avatar
Depends what you're flying. Most of us sailplane guys mix them while flying high aspect ratio wings to counter adverse yaw. On short low aspect ratio wings it may not matter as much.
Sep 02, 2016, 09:22 PM
Registered User
Newbie1980's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sailhigh
Depends what you're flying. Most of us sailplane guys mix them while flying high aspect ratio wings to counter adverse yaw. On short low aspect ratio wings it may not matter as much.
It's a H9 p51 mustang S . 54" wing span. I'm thinking prob won't do much. But thought I'd get some input from experienced pilots.
Sep 02, 2016, 09:42 PM
Registered User
I never mix rudder and ailerons. My opinion is that neither of them do what I want unless I tell them to do it.
Sep 02, 2016, 10:55 PM
S.A.D. member
ivanc's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by peterlngh
I never mix rudder and ailerons. My opinion is that neither of them do what I want unless I tell them to do it.
Same here - aileron and rudder are never used 100% in synch. For example coordinating a turn requires maintaining some amount of rudder during the turn while ailerons are used to bank the plane into the turn and then bank in the opposite direction to take it out of the turn while during the turn the ailerons are at or close to neutral.

Ivan
Sep 02, 2016, 11:46 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by ivanc
Same here - aileron and rudder are never used 100% in synch. For example coordinating a turn requires maintaining some amount of rudder during the turn while ailerons are used to bank the plane into the turn and then bank in the opposite direction to take it out of the turn while during the turn the ailerons are at or close to neutral.

Ivan
Yep. There is a time and place for "bank and yank" but, to me, three control axes, plus throttle, mean three four) separate control inputs. Or, as I continually tell student pilots, "the left stick is your friend". This is especially true with a big, heavy, fast warbird.

Take a look at any of the many "crash compilations" on YouTube. Most of the crashes are botched landings and most of them could have been avoided if the pilot had just used a little rudder and/or throttle instead of "chasing" the glide slope with aileron and elevator.

If one is not comfortable using both sticks? Get something like an Ugly Stick and learn to use all the controls like a full-scale plane before trying to fly a scale bird.

Aileron controls bank. Rudder controls heading. Elevator controls attitude. And throttle controls the sink rate. It really is as simple as that but a whole lot of RC pilots, through inadequate understanding and training, never seem to grasp it.

Cheers!
Sep 03, 2016, 01:36 AM
TigreJohn
Considering your plane and radio, I would be more prone to set up an aileron differential first before a rudder mix. Get rid of the adverse yaw before you use the rudder mix. On most planes, even with those with a symmetrical airfoil, a downward aileron movement creates more drag than an equal up aileron movement. Although you want to use right aileron, the drag differential wants to make the plane turn left which makes you use more aileron (or rudder) to offset it. A caveat: if you are going to be a 3D pilot, don't use it. It can hurt you inverted.
Last edited by jjkupinski; Sep 03, 2016 at 01:42 AM.
Sep 03, 2016, 05:10 AM
Registered User
Newbie1980's Avatar
Thanks everyone for the feedback. All the info is helpful. I'll just leave the mixing alone for now.
Sep 03, 2016, 05:47 AM
Registered User
Put the mix on a switch and try it, this way you can learn if you like it or not. Fly high and turn the mix on and try it out, you might like it, start at low number like 5%, increase or decrease to your liking. The mixes are there to help you out, you just need to learn when to use. Attached is an article that explains various mixes.
Sep 03, 2016, 07:01 AM
Registered User
Newbie1980's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Hallo
Put the mix on a switch and try it, this way you can learn if you like it or not. Fly high and turn the mix on and try it out, you might like it, start at low number like 5%, increase or decrease to your liking. The mixes are there to help you out, you just need to learn when to use. Attached is an article that explains various mixes.
Thank you
Sep 03, 2016, 11:22 PM
S.A.D. member
ivanc's Avatar
Mixes are used to compensate any undesirable coupling tendencies in the airframe. Everything else is done with the two sticks and one or two additional switches if the plane has flaps and/or retracts.

Ivan