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Aug 07, 2016, 06:00 AM
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Which is better: as3x vs eagle tree guardian


You have only one of these to choose from. Which and why?
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Aug 07, 2016, 09:11 AM
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Eagle tree guardian as any radio sytem can be used with it. Good quality and able to set and adjust as prefered.

AS3x can be interesting if you fly Spectrum, but there are a lot of different gyro recievers sold with ARF's that are locked in. I.a.w. you can't use them in any way you like.
Aug 07, 2016, 12:24 PM
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I prefer the asx system
Aug 08, 2016, 05:08 AM
Registered User
Eagletree without a doubt! I have three planes with each. The three with the Eagletree are easily more configurable and stable. I mainly used them to take off and land in high wind 15mph to 40mph. I've used them on a Dx6i, dx8. And a Taranis x9d Plus. The SAFE on as3x is the worst thing spektrum implemented. Spektrum could easily make it completely configurable but choose to slowly release version after version with small upgrades. Ok. Rant over.

I even prefer the lemon rx stabilizer (4 planes) over as3x. You can use your control knob to increase or decrease gain and can turn on - off stabilization as needed. Plus it's only $26. I even used it on my first nitro plane.

I've tried orange stabilizer and it is crude to say the least BUT you can turn it off and on with a flick of a switch. We hand launch planes in Hifh wind and that's all it's good for.
Last edited by WyoRip; Aug 08, 2016 at 05:21 AM.
Aug 08, 2016, 05:47 AM
A man with too many toys
I have several Eagle tree guardians and they are excellent.

They are excellent for hand launch as you can set them up to keep the wings level and climb out without touching the sticks. The 3D mode is excellent for sport flying and aerobatics on windy days.

If you have a large enough airplane the HOBBY EAGLE A3 super II is a better choice because ti has many more features. It all depends on what you are flying. https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show....php?t=2013634


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Aug 08, 2016, 02:11 PM
Registered User
Good point Rcman. I have a fpv mini Skywalker that was almost unlaunchable. Put an Eagletree guardian on it. Hold (position) the plane you want for take off and then flick one switch on transmitter to set position on guardian. Chuck plane as hard as you can and it just takes off easily with NO torque roll or effected by wind, completely level (bad toss -- cough).
Last edited by WyoRip; Aug 08, 2016 at 02:16 PM.
Aug 08, 2016, 03:43 PM
Registered User
Markran's Avatar
I bought the Eagle Tree Guardian to configure a plane for my young daughter to learn on post buddy box. Installing it in her plane was a bit of a pain because of the mounting requirements but I eventually got it done. It flies okay but getting the modes set up requires reading the manual and a bit of experimentation. It's not hard per se, if you're comfortable installing a stabilizer. However, I'm pretty busy with work, life and other projects and now, after a year still haven't gotten it to the point where I've put it in her hands to fly.

My real interest is in the anti-crash feature of limiting the bank and pitch of the plane so it can't be easily crashed on beginner solo flights. It doesn't seem like this is the primary use case of the Guardian and my sense is that's why the set up wasn't as easy as I was hoping.

Last week the new Champ S plane hit stores and I picked one up. It's simply perfect for my application as a trainer that prevents newbies from crashing (or at least resists it). Horizon has incrementally evolved their SAFE technology (which includes AS3x) over the past few years from "pretty neat" to "miraculous".

I actually tried last night to crash it on purpose and in beginner mode you would have to really work at it. I'm confident that the Guardian can probably offer a similar outcome but it's going to take some work to install, set up and test. Not a lot of work compared to many other things in the hobby but with my life lately, it managed to require just a bit more than I could string together.

The Champ S with Horizon's latest iteration of SAFE offers a remarkably simple out-of-box experience well-suited to inexperienced or just busy folks. As of today it is the ultimate beginner trainer. The increased size over the original Champ makes it substantially more stable with longer flight times yet it will still fly comfortably in a small softball field. It's quiet enough and light enough to be completely non-threatening and unlikely to cause injury even if it collides with a kid. The 2s brushless power system gives it enough thrust to be useful for learning in 2-4 mph winds whereas the original Champ required basically zero wind for first flights (it could handle a bit more once you had experience). The self-righting, stabilization, return to home, virtual fence and auto-land features work so well they are damn near magic. As a bonus, when you turn off the beginner mode it's a very nice 4 channel sport flyer with stabilization.
Last edited by Markran; Aug 08, 2016 at 04:15 PM.
Aug 08, 2016, 06:50 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by Markran
The Champ S with Horizon's latest iteration of SAFE offers a remarkably simple out-of-box experience well-suited to inexperienced or just busy folks.
I agree, but the downside is: when you grow out of that Champs S, op crash it for example.. you end up with a reciever that probably can't be used on another airplane you like to buy / build.
Aug 08, 2016, 07:36 PM
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Markran's Avatar
> "you end up with a reciever that probably can't be used on another airplane you like to buy / build. "

Not necessarily. As I mentioned, I was never that thrilled with my original Champ, so after a year of sitting unloved in the hanger, I stripped the brick out of it and recycled the Champ parts into this inexpensive Stingray kit which was made specifically to give new life to old Champ components.

I actually enjoy the Champ parts in the Stingray body even more than I enjoyed them in the original Champ. There are "Second Life" kits or plans like this for many of most popular mass produced planes, and I have a feeling the Champ S+ is going to be *wildly* popular

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show....php?t=1761053

The Champ S+ is notably more sturdy than the original Champ. If you do manage to crash the Champ S+ enough to damage it, you almost certainly weren't flying it in beginner mode. Being a flagship beginner plane, parts will be readily available. My LHS has always carried a deep inventory of replacements for all the original Champ parts. It's true they aren't exactly cheap but my two most similar planes, the UMX Carbon Cub and original Champ both took a lot of abuse over years (because they are so twitchy and wind-vulnerable) and I just kept patching them with tape and glue. They got uglier (or, as I like to say, gained personality) but they kept flying. Ultimately, I only ever bought new parts for cosmetic reasons, which I consider optional.

At the end of the day, I agree with you. Separate components are the way to go. But only once a pilot is more experienced in the hobby. I encourage intermediate pilots to buy components and scratch build both to save money and have access to unique flying experiences. I often recommend gear like the Taranis (an almost infinitely flexible radio) and Lemon receivers (cheap, simple and reliable) because they make our dollars go a lot farther BUT not for beginners.

I'm usually no Horizon fan boy because as an advanced pilot I'm not their target but with the Champ S+ they've made a plane I think can help the hobby grow by leaps and bounds and that's exciting.
Latest blog entry: Champ S+ Fly Away
Aug 09, 2016, 06:13 PM
Chasin' that Neon Rainbow
Grantham Kid's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by RC Man
I have several Eagle tree guardians and they are excellent.

They are excellent for hand launch as you can set them up to keep the wings level and climb out without touching the sticks. The 3D mode is excellent for sport flying and aerobatics on windy days.

If you have a large enough airplane the HOBBY EAGLE A3 super II is a better choice because ti has many more features. It all depends on what you are flying. https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show....php?t=2013634

.
I had a Guardian and found it a pain to set up properly.
First one was a dud and it was replaced under warranty after I lost a couple of planes.
Then my PC died and I got a Mac so Guardian was useless to me as I couldn't program it.

You need a laptop at the field for them.

The A3 Super II has a small program box that can be thrown in your kit. It is a much better option. It is 6 Axis as well with it's on-board accelerometers, and, of course has the all important remote gain.
Lets face it, technology moves on and Guardian, while it was/is good, is older technology now.
Aug 09, 2016, 06:39 PM
A man with too many toys
The A3 Super II also has Sbus input that cuts down on wiring. That's my favorite but may be too heavy for some real small park flyers.


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Aug 09, 2016, 06:58 PM
Registered User
atreis's Avatar
Not sure if anyone has pointed out to the OP that AS3X and the Guardian aren't similar. The former is strictly stability control without self-leveling while the latter has self-leveling. A more appropriate comparison would be AS3X with SAFE, the Eagle Tree Guardian, and the A3 Super II.

My preference: Apprentice SAFE receiver. No fiddling. Just install, bind, and fly.
Latest blog entry: TopFlite DC3
Aug 09, 2016, 07:21 PM
Really?!?
ChrisS's Avatar
I normally do not mess with such things, but recently had need for a device to keep the wings leveled on a camera platform. The Guardian has been phenominal for this. Setup was slick, I didn't even turn the pots, just put the gain on a knob and dialed it back in flight until the plane stopped hunting. Super product in my book.

Looking back, I can remember a couple planes that might have lasted a bit longer had I had one of these. A particular model that comes to mind was an 88 inch DH-88 Comet that was a screaming bitch to get off the ground or if you got it just a tad too slow. That thing just wanted to drop a tip and dig a hole. I think the Guardian would solve this. In fact, I still have that model, my have to dig it out and give it a go again.

Chris


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