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Aug 03, 2016, 06:51 AM
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The Part 107 Certificate Test: Industry Asks FAA for Changes


http://dronelife.com/2016/08/02/indu...part-107-test/

"Finally, the letter asks the FAA to ensure that the test doesn’t overreach, and includes only the skills really necessary to operate a drone. 'It is critical to the public’s acceptance of the aeronautical knowledge test that it be focused on the knowledge, skills, and behaviors needed to operate a UAS,” says the letter. …we are concerned that the aeronautical knowledge test may be unduly burdensome if it includes questions pertinent only to operations in controlled airspace appropriate for manned aircraft pilots.'"
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Aug 03, 2016, 07:49 AM
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Text of letter to FAA
http://www.suasnews.com/2016/08/smal...on-letter-faa/

"The FAA requires remote pilot applicants to understand radio communication procedures to avoid safety risks at Class G airports, yet use of radio communications is not required. The FAA states that the knowledge of these procedures will provide the ability to employ the Common Traffic Advisory Frequency (CTAF) as a valuable resource. It is one thing to require a remote pilot to know of this resource, and another to require an understanding of the radio communications procedures."
Aug 03, 2016, 07:54 PM
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Learning how to use the CTAF for situational awareness is pretty simple and a valuable tool. Sounds to me like someone is just too lazy to learn something new.
Aug 03, 2016, 08:32 PM
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I can't speak for the Small UAV Coalition. Myself, I am enjoying learning aeronautics and conventional pilot knowledge, and look forward to a high standard for testing for the remote pilot certification.

My issue is that FAA has not provided a good handbook resource specific to remote piloting, leaving us to pick through the various pilot training materials to piece together a personal knowledge base for taking the test.

My guess is that we are for the most part a population unfamiliar with FAA resources.

For example, I know from the sUAS airman certification test standards document [PDF] what CTAF is. But I have no idea how to learn about it, and what I need to know. Will I need to gain some practical experience using CTAF in order to have the knowledge needed?

For example, how much do we need to know from Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowlege [PDF] or Airman Knowledge Testing Supplement for Sport Pilot, Recreational Pilot, and Private Pilot [PDF]?

So, not lazy at all... just looking for FAA to organize and present resources pertinent to the sUAS airman certification test standards. Otherwise, I'm just feeling a little lost in the dark... a dunce perhaps, but not lazy.
Last edited by bluesgeek; Aug 03, 2016 at 08:34 PM. Reason: corrected link for Airman Knowledge Testing Supplement
Aug 04, 2016, 10:32 PM
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From what I'm understanding from my reading, having a VHF radio on site would be a good idea anyway.
Aug 05, 2016, 08:11 AM
Multirotors are models too!
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Originally Posted by bluesgeek View Post
From what I'm understanding from my reading, having a VHF radio on site would be a good idea anyway.
A VHF that covers airbands at that
Aug 07, 2016, 07:00 AM
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Originally Posted by bluesgeek View Post
From what I'm understanding from my reading, having a VHF radio on site would be a good idea anyway.
And knowing where to find the various frequencies that apply (tower, CTAF, ATIS/ASOS/AWOS). And there's also that issue of being capable of interpreting what a pilot is saying in a position report.

Here's a test - You're operating two miles south of a Class G airport. On the CTAF you hear a pilot call "Podunk traffic, Skylane 32731 two-mile 45 for the left downwind 21. Podunk."

Do you have any idea where to look for this aircraft or determine if he's even near you?

Having a radio won't help if you don't know what frequencies are relevant based on airspace class, and what is being said on the radio.
Aug 07, 2016, 12:25 PM
Multirotors are models too!
Quote:
Originally Posted by UAVCFI View Post
And knowing where to find the various frequencies that apply (tower, CTAF, ATIS/ASOS/AWOS). And there's also that issue of being capable of interpreting what a pilot is saying in a position report.

Here's a test - You're operating two miles south of a Class G airport. On the CTAF you hear a pilot call "Podunk traffic, Skylane 32731 two-mile 45 for the left downwind 21. Podunk."

Do you have any idea where to look for this aircraft or determine if he's even near you?

Having a radio won't help if you don't know what frequencies are relevant based on airspace class, and what is being said on the radio.
If you are flying via Part 107, you should probably have a sectional for the area you are in.
Aug 07, 2016, 10:56 PM
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Yep, a sectional is nearly a requirement for Part 107 operations. Otherwise, it will be really difficult to know what airspace you are in.
Aug 11, 2016, 08:24 PM
BirdsEyeView Aero
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The FAA is not involved with training. They provide the Airman Certification Standards, and generally the market at large supplies the training material and courses. The candidate for the rating is responsible for obtaining the knowledge and experience to satisfy the ACS.

What the problem is that since this is a brand new rating from a brand new Regulation, the training market is going to lag behind the regulation until such time that people start demanding the training, and vendors understand how to present the materials in the most efficient and logical manner.

This happened when the Recreational and Sport Pilot ratings first came out.

These guys so far seem to be the most prepared for the best cost:

www.uavgroundschool.com
Aug 12, 2016, 09:55 AM
BirdsEyeView Aero
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http://jrupprechtlaw.com/part-107-ac...tion-standards
Oct 11, 2016, 11:47 AM
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I bet in reality, that the vast majority of the people who get the 107 license never look at a sectional again.

A better solution is to use an app on your smartphone that can warn you about the current area that you are flying in. However, NOT one that prevents your drone from taking off (i.e., DJI).
Oct 12, 2016, 08:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VintageSlots View Post
I bet in reality, that the vast majority of the people who get the 107 license never look at a sectional again.
Probably true, but they'll be looking at one in two years when it's time to study for the recertification test... Easier to retain the knowledge through use, then to try to relearn all the material right before recert time. But that's just me, and I have a bad memory.


---

As for the test content as a whole, yes, some of it is sorta irrelevant. Some is plain out mandated and the FAA has no choice regarding its inclusion (ADM). My thought process is that the test is so easy as-is, that if you can't pass it, you put no effort into it at all and don't deserve to be in the NAS for money anyway.
Oct 13, 2016, 01:11 PM
Traranisaurus TX
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty105 View Post
A VHF that covers airbands at that
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluesgeek View Post
From what I'm understanding from my reading, having a VHF radio on site would be a good idea anyway.
Keep in mind that you must have a Ground Station License to operate a handheld transmitter. An Amaturer Radio license would not suffice, since the Aviation frequencies are not within the amaturer radio bands. Not to mention the fact that amatuer radio privileges cannot be used for commercial purposes in the first place.

http://wireless.fcc.gov/services/ind...craft_stations

That said, there are always exceptions. You might get away with using a handheld transmitter in an emergency situation (e.g. to avoid an imminent collision with a full scale aircraft). You could also legally listen to the CTAF on a handheld (or a scanner) without a station license, as long as you do not transmit. This would be a good idea, as it would give you an idea of where nearby aircraft might be flying at low altitudes.
Oct 13, 2016, 04:00 PM
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Woo hoo. One of my 107 waivers was just authorized. This one is to allow me to fly at night.

I submitted the request on 8/29


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