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Aug 01, 2016, 10:34 AM
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Mini-Review

Dumas "Rusty" the Shrimp Boat


When the opportunity comes up to build another work boat there's just no way I'll let it go by. The subject of this review falls well into the class of boats I like to build and run.

The kit contains all of the necessary parts to built the model, except the drive hardware which is available in a package from Dumas. Ordering the drive hardware along with the kit is a good idea, because not long into the build you'll need at least the stuffing box to keep going.

Construction is primarily of balsa, lite ply, birch ply, & Sintra. The strip wood supplied is of balsa and bass wood, with more then enough supplied to complete the model. Also included are a complete step-by-step instruction booklet along with nearly 70 detail drawings, and a full size layout drawing to aid in construction.

One piece of advice that I will always offer when getting started building a Dumas kit is to read the instructions, including all of the notes and building tips, and study the detail and full size layout drawings before construction begins. If you do that, and follow the instructions along the way, the build will go flawlessly. So let's get started. . . . .
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Aug 01, 2016, 10:37 AM
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Building the Display Stand


The first step in the process is to build the display stand. It's a simple set up, and will come in handy as the build progresses.
Aug 01, 2016, 10:48 AM
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Laminating the Keel Parts and Building the Hull Frames


The keel parts are laminated from two layers of lite ply. Carpenters glue or epoxy can be used, but I used Cya and clamped the parts together once they were aligned.

The hull frames are built up directly over the pattern sheets provided. The frames were built up one at a time then set aside for assembly later.
Aug 01, 2016, 10:56 AM
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Building the Keel


The keel is built up using a bass wood stick and the previously assembled parts. The stuffing box is an integral part of the keel, so you'll need it before you can proceed. Shims are needed to center the keel parts on the stuffing box so that it's centered in the assembly. When everything was in place and aligned, the parts were assembled using 15 minute epoxy.
Aug 01, 2016, 11:02 AM
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Assembling the Hull Frames on the Keel Keel


The location of each hull frame is marked on the keel using the keel assembly drawing for reference. Once the keel is marked up, the jigs are glued in place on the building board using the dimensions provided in the instructions. The keel is then placed on the jigs and the frames aligned and glued in place. Then with all the frames in place, the sheers are fitted and glued in place.
Aug 01, 2016, 11:08 AM
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Assembling the Bulwarks


The bulwarks in the kit are made from lite ply. However, being a big fan of Sintra, I used the kit parts as patterns and made up new parts to use on my model. Before the parts were glued in place they were joined and the seams filled with Bondo and sanded into contour.

However, if you use the kit provided parts, there's a procedure called out in the instructions to pre-mold the curve into the front section. Once that's done, the parts are aligned and glued in place.
Aug 01, 2016, 11:12 AM
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Fitting the Frame Stiffeners


Support pieces are glued in place between the frames to stabilize the cross pieces. Dimensions are given for each of their locations.
Aug 01, 2016, 11:21 AM
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Planking the Hull


The hull was sanded to contour the frames and level everything up, then is planked with strips of 1/8 x 1/2 balsa beginning at the keel. I will often times deviate a bit from the recommended sequence, but this time I decided to follow the steps to the letter and was pleasantly surprised at just how well the process went. The six bottom planks were done first, each going in with no trimming required. I did wet the outside of the wood to soften it a bit making the twists and bends a bit easier to accomplish.
Aug 01, 2016, 11:29 AM
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Working Down the Sides


The side planking was added beginning with a straight run allowing it to make it's own curve, Then 3 sections were added at the front to fill the gap left above the first plank. Once that's done, the next plank is added with no trimming required.
Aug 01, 2016, 11:33 AM
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Adding the Remaining Planks


From this point on, all of the planks will need to be trimmed and fitted. It's not a huge deal, but take your time to fit them properly and thing will go well. Then once all of the planks are in, there will be a small gap that needs filling which is done by fitting a small section of planking into the gap. You can see how the piece was sized looking at the photo showing all of the reference marks used to size the section.
Aug 01, 2016, 11:42 AM
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Fitting the Bow Blocks


The bow blocks are cut from a 1" thick balsa block. The blocks were glued in places and carved to rough shape.
Aug 01, 2016, 11:46 AM
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Sanding, Shaping, and Filling the Hull


The entire hull was block sanded to rough shape. Then a coat of drywall mud was squeegeed onto the hull and when dry block sanded again. Then to fill the last of the irregularities a second coat of putty was applied, and when dry will be finish sanded to prep the hull for fiberglass.

Stay tuned, there's lots more to come. . . . .

PAT
Aug 03, 2016, 05:34 PM
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Fiberglassing the Hull


The hull was finished sanded, then a 2 oz. fiberglass sheathing added. When the layup had cured, the cloth was trimmed and the external keel, rub rail and cap rails were added. And finally, a mix of epoxy and micro-balloons was applied around all of the edges to seal them on. From here we'll go back inside and seal up the inside of the hull and the last of the bare wood on the outside. Then the hull can be prepped for paint.

PAT
Aug 03, 2016, 08:22 PM
Grumpa Tom
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Nice work as always Pat. You make it look so simple, as always.
Aug 04, 2016, 12:31 PM
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Kmot, I appreciate that, but sure can't take all the credit. These more recent Dumas offerings are so well engineered that they really aren't that hard to build. I've known Tom (the designer) for several years, have built the majority of his more recent designs, and have watched him "mature" in his design style with each new offering. Dumas offers some really nice designs and I've truly enjoyed building every one of them.

PAT


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