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Jun 21, 2016, 10:11 AM
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FAA Press Release – FAA Finalize Rules for Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems


For the sake of consolidating information on Part 107, I'm closing this thread and referring to this article and discussion in Model Aircraft & Drone Advocacy.

https://www.faa.gov/news/press_relea...m?newsId=20515

Summary of FAA 107 Rule PDF

Part 107 Rule PDF

FAA: Becoming a Pilot

FAA: Enroll in Part 107 sUAS Course

FAA: Knowledge Testing Centers [PDF]
Last edited by bluesgeek; Jun 22, 2016 at 02:57 PM. Reason: Closing thread
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Jun 21, 2016, 10:22 AM
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What is meant by:

"Maximum altitude of 400 feet above ground level (AGL) or, if
higher than 400 feet AGL, remain within 400 feet of a
structure."
Jun 21, 2016, 10:25 AM
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"Transportation of property for compensation or hire allowed"
Jun 21, 2016, 10:36 AM
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branflakes's Avatar
i think that specifically says we cannot fly at midnight anymore, and that implies its for the 2lb ones not for ultra lights who may do LED night battles, the small weighted ones are still allowed 400 feet at night with lights right? ive been hoping they don't kill phantom night flights responsibly flown. case in point, the sick footage im about to get on jul 4th, w that be illegal next yr
Jun 21, 2016, 10:42 AM
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mx42689's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluesgeek
What is meant by:

"Maximum altitude of 400 feet above ground level (AGL) or, if
higher than 400 feet AGL, remain within 400 feet of a
structure."
This is interesting. I wonder if it is meant for building inspection purposes? Like flying a drone up the side of a building and as long as its 400 or closer, you can fly at any altitude?
Jun 21, 2016, 10:51 AM
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C. Costs and Benefits [from PDF]

"...FAA anticipates that this final rule will provide an opportunity to substitute small UAS operations for some risky manned flights, such as inspection of houses, towers, bridges, or parks, thereby averting potential fatalities and injuries.

"The FAA has analyzed the benefits and the costs associated with this final rule. The estimated out-of-pocket cost for an individual to become FAA certificated as a remote pilot with a small UAS rating is $150, which is less than the cost of any other airman certification that allows non-recreational operations in the NAS. 4

"The final rule will enable a new industry to unfold while imposing relatively low individual costs. "

4 To become certificated as remote pilot with a small UAS rating, an individual is only required to pass a knowledge test. The certification does not require an individual to attend ground school or to pass a practical skills exam, both of which are required to receive an airman’s certificate for sport pilot and above.
Jun 21, 2016, 10:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by branflakes
i think that specifically says we cannot fly at midnight anymore, and that implies its for the 2lb ones not for ultra lights who may do LED night battles, the small weighted ones are still allowed 400 feet at night with lights right? ive been hoping they don't kill phantom night flights responsibly flown. case in point, the sick footage im about to get on jul 4th, w that be illegal next yr
From page 224 of the Rule: PDF

"To address the concerns expressed by commenters requesting higher operating altitudes in proximity to buildings, towers, power lines, and other tall structures for the purposes of inspections and repair, the FAA is establishing new provisions in the final rule that will enable those operations in a way that does not compromise aviation safety. Specifically, the FAA notes that 14 CFR 91.119 generally prohibits manned aircraft from operating in close proximity to structures. Section 91.119 requires manned aircraft to stay 500 to 1,000 feet away from the structure, depending on whether the area is congested. Because manned aircraft are not permitted to operate in close proximity to structures, this rule will allow a small unmanned aircraft to fly higher than 400 feet AGL as long as that aircraft remains within a 400-foot radius of a structure up to an altitude of 400 feet above the structure’s immediate uppermost limit. Allowing higher-altitude small UAS operations within a 400-foot lateral limit of a structure will enable additional operations (such as tower inspection and repair) while maintaining separation between small unmanned aircraft and most manned aircraft operations."
Jun 21, 2016, 11:04 AM
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mx42689's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluesgeek
From page 224 of the Rule: PDF

"To address the concerns expressed by commenters requesting higher operating altitudes in proximity to buildings, towers, power lines, and other tall structures for the purposes of inspections and repair, the FAA is establishing new provisions in the final rule that will enable those operations in a way that does not compromise aviation safety. Specifically, the FAA notes that 14 CFR 91.119 generally prohibits manned aircraft from operating in close proximity to structures. Section 91.119 requires manned aircraft to stay 500 to 1,000 feet away from the structure, depending on whether the area is congested. Because manned aircraft are not permitted to operate in close proximity to structures, this rule will allow a small unmanned aircraft to fly higher than 400 feet AGL as long as that aircraft remains within a 400-foot radius of a structure up to an altitude of 400 feet above the structure’s immediate uppermost limit. Allowing higher-altitude small UAS operations within a 400-foot lateral limit of a structure will enable additional operations (such as tower inspection and repair) while maintaining separation between small unmanned aircraft and most manned aircraft operations."
This is incredible! The FAA did it right regarding this rule.
Jun 21, 2016, 11:08 AM
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"Visual line-of-sight (VLOS) only; the unmanned aircraft must
remain within VLOS of the remote pilot in command and the
person manipulating the flight controls of the small UAS.
Alternatively, the unmanned aircraft must remain within
VLOS of the visual observer."

So FPV without a spotter is illegal? So I'm going to be breaking the law when I'm alone practicing FPV pylon racing out in the middle of a field flying 5 feet off the ground 99% of the time and never over 50 feet in the air in my racing 250mm class miniquad?

I often fly FPV by myself.
Jun 21, 2016, 11:12 AM
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JohnCC's Avatar
Wow, so, if I'm understanding this right, I can fly a drone commercially for AP work for example with the certificate? That is really good news, needing a pilot's license to fly commercially was such BS.

Quote:
So FPV without a spotter is illegal
FPV without a spotter has been "illegal" for some time now even for non commercial use.
Jun 21, 2016, 11:12 AM
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branflakes's Avatar
from that caption, I couldn't understand the night flight rules can someone clarify regarding just night flights
Jun 21, 2016, 11:14 AM
What goes up, hopefully lands!
Repaid1's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plur303
"Visual line-of-sight (VLOS) only; the unmanned aircraft must
remain within VLOS of the remote pilot in command and the
person manipulating the flight controls of the small UAS.
Alternatively, the unmanned aircraft must remain within
VLOS of the visual observer."

So FPV without a spotter is illegal? So I'm going to be breaking the law when I'm alone practicing FPV pylon racing out in the middle of a field flying 5 feet off the ground 99% of the time and never over 50 feet in the air in my racing 250mm class miniquad?

I often fly FPV by myself.
Ease up and read: Today, the Department of Transportation’s Federal Aviation Administration has finalized the first operational rules (PDF) for routine commercial use of small unmanned aircraft systems (UAS or “drones”)
Jun 21, 2016, 11:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by branflakes
from that caption, I couldn't understand the night flight rules can someone clarify regarding just night flights
None of today's ruling applies to hobby use. This is all about commercial flights. Looksike a lot of good stuff happening in the future. These rules seem reasonable. On to the first delivery of a drone by an Amazon drone under control of a certified drone pilot.
Jun 21, 2016, 12:21 PM
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branflakes's Avatar
Thanks!
Jun 21, 2016, 01:23 PM
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So wonder how long it will take before the testing gets up and going. The ruling of the law goes in August andf they state 180 day you after that to get the knowledge test done.


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