ArmSafe Arming Kit - RCGroups.com Review

With electric models now commonplace, safety is a growing concern for motors that can spin up without warning.

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Introduction

Product:ArmSafe Arming Kit
Options:14/12/10AWG
Manufacturer:Schumacher Products LLC
Price:$12.94-$14.33
Available from:HorizonHobby.com
PDF Manual:Click Here

Everyone has heard the stories, seen the pictures, been at the field or God forbid been an actual victim of an injury caused by a spinning propeller. With electric models now commonplace, safety is a growing concern for motors that can spin up without warning. Schumacher Products LLC developed the ArmSafe Arming Kits to give the pilot complete control of when their electric aircraft is armed.

I'd been curious about these systems for some time, and I decided when building the Hangar 9 Extra 330SC for review that this would be a good time to try one! Horizons' product page for the Extra even suggested the right one for that power system. There are 3 different options available with 10, 12 and 14AWG wiring to match your power requirements. With the E-Flite Power 60 & 6s lipo setup on this particular airplane pulling over 80 Amps, Horizon correctly suggested the 10AWG kit (SUD0305) which is rated for 100 Amps continuous, and 150 Amps burst. The 12AWG kit (SUD0304) is rated for 80-120 Amps, and the 14AWG kit (SUD0303) will handle 50-75 Amps.

Installation

The kit itself is relatively simple, with just a few parts. Included in the ArmSafe Arming Kit, you'll get 18" of wire, heat-shrink, aluminum mounting ring, plug mount, mounting bolts, female ultra plug and the actual arming plug.

The installation of the ArmSafe is quick and the instructions take you through each step. Begin by locating where you want the plug on your fuselage, ideally near the nose or close to your electronics. Trace the inside of the aluminum ring and the 3 mounting holes onto the plane. Carefully cut out the hole and test fit the black base.

Now turn on that soldering iron and start by connecting the red wire from your ESC to the female ultra plug. Then use the provided wire to go from the other prong on the ultra plug to the positive end of your battery plug. Make sure before you cut the length of wire, that you've made it long enough to go from your ArmSafe mounting location to your battery inside the fuselage.

Slide the female plug through the aluminum ring and out through the hole in the plane. From the outside, slide the black mount onto the plug and secure with the 2 grub screws. Don't over tighten these, as it'll deform the mount and it wont fit onto the aluminum ring! Finally, slide the black mount into the fuselage hole and secure with the provided bolts into the aluminum ring on the inside.

Operation

To operate, simply plug the arming plug into the base. This completes the circuit and arms your system. You may notice a spark when plugging in the arming plug, but this is completely normal. Don't loose your arming plug! I'd suggest zip-tieing a female ultra plug to your transmitter to store your arming plug when it's not on the plane itself. You could also use a string or cord to keep the plug connected to the mount on the plane.

Summary

The advantage of using the ArmSafe system is giving you total control over your electronics until you're at the line, ready to fly. It's easy to become complacent with our airplanes, forgetting that there's a sharp propeller spinning thousands of rpms up front. All it takes is a tiny distraction or a single bump of the throttle for something to go wrong. With ArmSafe you can safely plug in your battery and secure the canopy, carry your plane and equipment to the field, and finally arm the plane when it's time to fly. For the low cost and the ease of installation of the ArmSafe kit, I'd definitely recommend using these for an extra layer of safety on your electric aircraft.

Last edited by Nikolei Zinsli; May 19, 2016 at 09:11 PM..
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May 28, 2016, 09:21 AM
Registered User
D_FAST's Avatar
Interesting.
How does it stay in place once armed?
Can vibrations wiggle it loose?
If so, then what?
May 31, 2016, 03:45 PM
"Get off the runway!"
Da Big_G's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by D_FAST View Post
Interesting.
How does it stay in place once armed?
Can vibrations wiggle it loose?
If so, then what?
Friction keeps it in place. It's a Deans connector. Been using them for years...never an issue. Get the one with the keeper string....ask my why...
Jun 05, 2016, 05:36 PM
3D Junkie
ZacFlyer's Avatar
I have one of these and it is great! It has a really strong friction fit.
Latest blog entry: DX7s
Sep 27, 2016, 11:42 AM
Registered User
Or you could make one using a male and female deans. The male comming from a dead battery,solder the ends together and dip in any plastic dip. You can take a rubber grommet and do a bit of carving to fit the female. Some hot glue and a little bitching should do it.
Sep 28, 2016, 01:47 PM
Registered with FAA since 2016
Rhea's Avatar
I don't have male connectors on my batteries. I hope you don't either.
Oct 10, 2016, 04:14 PM
Kilmary Kid
There is a competitive arming switch system based on Anderson Powerpole connectors. I've installed it on a couple of my airplanes. I had some problems with intermittent connections--you put the arming switch plug in and didn't complete the circuit. Since the item was "factory made" I expected it to work every time--and it didn't. I'm going to try one of these systems since I figure that there'll be less chance of failure to connect when you push the male Deans plug home.
Oct 10, 2016, 11:39 PM
Registered User
vollrathd's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikemyersgln@c View Post
There is a competitive arming switch system based on Anderson Powerpole connectors. I've installed it on a couple of my airplanes. I had some problems with intermittent connections--you put the arming switch plug in and didn't complete the circuit. Since the item was "factory made" I expected it to work every time--and it didn't. I'm going to try one of these systems since I figure that there'll be less chance of failure to connect when you push the male Deans plug home.
Yeah
I've run into two failures of the Deans connectors that appeared to be the result of mixing the original Deans connectors with some counterfeit units.

Here is that thread I created a month or three ago.
https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...s#post35546629

For me, all of my models running under 3000 Watts use the APP connectors. They work well, with current running up to 80 Amps.


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