Which sailboat to get you started in RC sailing - MODS PLEASE STICKY THIS - Page 5 - RC Groups
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May 18, 2017, 10:18 AM
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Aug 03, 2017, 02:47 PM
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rgburrill's Avatar
The issue I have with this entire thread is that it is about one thing - competition! Newcomers quite often aren't interested in competition. I have never been and never will be. I just want to sail and have fun.

With that in mind the second issue I have is the idea that boats must be in a class. That means my beautiful, self designed, self built all wood sailboat doesn't qualify in your mind. Bull. I designed that boat to test the feasibility of a new type of design for a full size boat.
Aug 03, 2017, 02:50 PM
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Since the thread is supposed to be about what boat to start with I'd say the Dumas Huson 24 and Star 30 are good starters. But then I like building things, not assembling what some factory has mostly built. My first boat was a Huson 24 and I'd still be sailing her today If a friend hadn't let her sink.
Aug 03, 2017, 07:06 PM
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Crunchy Frog's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by rgburrill
The issue I have with this entire thread is that it is about one thing - competition! Newcomers quite often aren't interested in competition. I have never been and never will be. I just want to sail and have fun.

With that in mind the second issue I have is the idea that boats must be in a class. That means my beautiful, self designed, self built all wood sailboat doesn't qualify in your mind. Bull. I designed that boat to test the feasibility of a new type of design for a full size boat.
There's absolutely nothing wrong with a scratch homebuild. I would always suggest that a would-be builder own *some* type of RC sailboat before designing and building their own - just for the frame of reference.

As for not wanting to race, please read what I wrote about that in the original post:

Quote:
But I don't want to race.

No problem. Show up with your boat. Ask questions. Watch the racing that happens. During races, pull it out of the water or sail it on the other side of the dock so you don't interfere.

In my experience, clubs exist because of racing. Sailing aimlessly around is relaxing and fun, but gets a bit tiresome after a short while. Racing is what keeps clubs going, fleets building and ultimately grows the sport of radio sailing. Does this mean you HAVE to race? Of course not. These are just my observations. Watch the racing, learn from it, keep an open mind. That is all.
So there's no pressure to race. But if your are a beginner, and even if you don't want to race, there's a distinct knowledge-base advantage to having the same boat that is popular locally.
Aug 05, 2017, 02:58 PM
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davidjensen's Avatar
My first was a Victor Blackhawk 32 which I had sitting I'm my shop for 10 years. It was a good starter but was crude in design with flat sails. the keel bent a lot under the weight of the bulb. I glassed the wood keel which helped a lot. I got a pair of sails from Rod Carr and they worked well. I love carbon masts. I sailed it against the Victoria fleet a few times and they were faster. The next boat was a T37. A fun build but again a crude design with a draggy bulb and flat sails. It has a very long boom that just kills the boats performance in medium to heavy air.
Last edited by davidjensen; Aug 05, 2017 at 03:03 PM.
Aug 12, 2017, 11:36 AM
Boomer1
Boomer1's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by rgburrill
Since the thread is supposed to be about what boat to start with I'd say the Dumas Huson 24 and Star 30 are good starters. But then I like building things, not assembling what some factory has mostly built. My first boat was a Huson 24 and I'd still be sailing her today If a friend hadn't let her sink.
My remarks on this particular discussion have more to do with the actual topic. Two friends of mine introduced me to the hobby. They convinced me I needed to get a boat right away so I could join them when they went sailing. I've been involved in boating most of my adult life so I thought it seemed like a good idea.
My friend suggested a boat to get me started, fortunately it was a Nirvana - a 32" long ready to sail package that was very affordable and came with all I needed. That was all it took, one day on the water and I was hooked. I discovered very quickly that I needed a decent radio since the AM radio the boat came with was easily taken over by almost any errant competing signal that would take control of my boat. I got a full featured 2.4ghz set up that I've been using now for 10 years.
In the ten years I've been doing this now, I've owned somewhere in the neighborhood of 35 RC boats, sail and power. I've had numerous aircraft but sold them all since I don't like taking my hard work home in a bag! One mistake and your plane is junk! No thanks!

The sad thing is the best starter boat is still the Nirvana, but sadly they are out of production with no sign of their returning. I still have a Nirvana and enjoy sailing it with my friends that have kept theirs all these years as well. So, if one was lucky enough to find a nice Nirvana for sale on line, that'd be my 1st choice. But since that is not likely there are so many opinions and choices out there.

Here's the deal, whatever a new sailor picks it should be able to create a positive experience for the newbee! Anything less and we lose a new sailor to something else to amuse them. I was not ready to build a boat because I knew nothing about RC sailboats or if I would even enjoy sailing one. Turns out I did like it, perhaps too much But the Nirvana's design features were exactly what I needed to get me hooked.

I wanted another boat! Didn't want to spend a lot and didn't know much so I ended up getting a very inexpensive Monsoon from Hobby King. I liked it's appearance and it's price was attractive. Had it for 2.5 years - learned a lot by having both boats. My friend owned the best looking RC sailboat I'd ever seen and I knew that I'd have one no matter what it took to get one. The boat was a Yamaha Round the World built by Tamiya. It took some months to find one, but I got one! After 10 years and having more the 35 boats, it is still my favorite RC sailboat.

Perhaps if I had been able to get that boat first I might have never lusted for other boats. Don't think so. I like toys! So moving forward what is a good started boat?

I too like kit boats but they are not for everyone. But a great starter kit would be a Victor 32. If you are a turn key person, then consider a DF65 or it's larger big brother the DF 95, both fun boats and not expensive. Another get started boat is the 1 Meter Seawind which is priced nicely at $360.00 with everything included. There are so many choices. Pick one you like the looks of an buy it! You can always sell it if you don't like it! We are not talking about tons of money here.

Join the fun! It won't hurt.
Boomer
Last edited by Boomer1; Aug 12, 2017 at 02:49 PM.
Aug 12, 2017, 02:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boomer1
... I've had numerous aircraft but sold them all since I don't like taking my hard work home in a bag! One mistake and your plane is junk! No thanks!

Here's the deal, whatever a new sailor picks it should be able to create a positive experience for the newbee! Anything less and we lose a new sailor to something else to amuse them. I was not ready to build a boat because I knew nothing about RC sailboats or if I would even enjoy sailing one. Turns out I did like it, perhaps too much ...
I cannot agree with these two items enough!!!

Second in my book is, you can build and experiment with very little worry and concern that all your work will end up in a pile.

And the basics of sailing are easy to get down, with the right boat. The right boat comes first, and even for an avid scratch builder, the right first boat really is NOT a scratch built thing, or even a kit built boat. Get one that gets you out on the water ASAP with minimal fuss, and also has good setup information available. Tuning these little sailboats is kinda difficult because it isn't easy to learn to sail, and try to figure out how the subtle changes change the feel of the boat. As a newbie, it just won't mentally translate. Get the sailing part down first.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Boomer1
If you are a turn key person, then consider a DF65 or it's larger big brother the DF 95, both fun boats and not expensive. ...We are not talking about tons of money here.

Join the fun! It won't hurt.
Boomer
I also vote for the DF65 for the simple fact that it is the most sailed RC sailboat in the world. Production won't be stopping anytime soon either, they are already on version 6! And there are awesome tuning guides to get a "base" tune dialed in bang on. This base tune is more than good enough to start racing with even.

If price on it is still too high, the Hydro Pro Affinity is a very similar boat. I suspect the DF65 tuning would get the Affinity dialed in close enough too, since it uses most of the same parts. Right now this boat is $91 + $12 shipping in the States. You will need a radio, receiver, and either 4x AA batteries, or a life battery pack.

I LOVE my DF65! I took some time to read over a few basic sailing books like Bond's Handbook of Sailing. But the most important thing might be to simply print out a basic sailing circle guide so you can figure out how to position sails for the direction you want to go. Googling "Sailing Circle" brings up dozens of images like the one below.

My first outing with the DF65 was my very first time ever sailing (well successfully anyways, I built a sailboat many years ago that sunk my first time out...) Anyways with a base tune set, I was able to not only get the boat going the direction I wanted, but was able to get it back to shore with no outside help. After just that first outing, I had the confidence to go out in bigger winds.

I had NO former sailing experience. And I can easily get the boat around various marks now with no fear of a broken pile of balsa. I have flown planes on and off for over 25yrs. I still crash them more often than not. And have built more than a couple planes I never even flew for fear of ending up with that pile. In just 6 months, my sailing skills are easily past my flying ones. I have no fear of putting one of my handmade boats out on the water, or even just sailing a new boat I haven't skippered before.


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