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Apr 18, 2016, 05:56 PM
Official Old Git!
Thread OP
Cool

Never knew trenches were so interesting


The workmanship and detail that goes into these models is fantastic.

http://www.planetfigure.com/threads/...ections.77655/

And I didn't realise the logic in the trench layout etc.
Apr 18, 2016, 06:41 PM
Redbilly Band Member
Ron H's Avatar
It sure is nice not to have been in one.
Apr 18, 2016, 08:36 PM
Registered User
Libelle201B's Avatar
Barbed wire will never stop an enemy, it will however channel them into your pre designated fields of fire, along the wire where they would be clustered, imagine a set of saw teeth each with strands of barbed wire along the edge of each tooth, and a machine gun at the base of each tooth firing parallel along that wire in both directions, not good news for any infantryman.
Apr 18, 2016, 08:44 PM
Registered User
The sump is the most important part.
Apr 18, 2016, 08:58 PM
Misfit Multirotor Monkey
Cyberdactyl's Avatar
Very nice work.
Apr 18, 2016, 09:16 PM
Trons and Fumes
wrightme's Avatar
Very interesting, thanks for sharing the link.
Apr 18, 2016, 10:28 PM
Suspended Account
Very cool. There was a show on TV not long ago showing the excavation of WW1 trenches.
Lots of bits left still.
Apr 19, 2016, 09:51 PM
Really?
dll932's Avatar
Very well done! They look like museum exhibits.
Apr 19, 2016, 11:56 PM
Not THAT Ira
Real Ira's Avatar
My Grandpa Pellitier had the misfortune to fight in WWI and survived a lot of craptastic horrors including crawling his way back from behind enemy lines and being mustard gassed and losing a toe to trench foot
. He had a very cool dagger some German prisoner had made for him out of an artillery band. He used it as a letter opener. I only know of this because I had marveled at the beauty and craftsmanship of it and he shared it's history with me. I remember asking if he was scared the prisoner would use it to kill him and escape. He just laughed and told me he let them clean his rifle too, explaining that those poor bastards had it so much better off as prisoners that they were delighted to be prisoners.

My Grandmother insisted the drawer full of medals be kept put away and not discussed because "boys heads should not be filled with war talk." I would give almost anything to hear of my grandfathers uncensored exploits.
On the 1-10 scale I consider all of the hardship in my life to be about a 2 to his 9, and I have been through some s***
Apr 20, 2016, 06:58 AM
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Libelle201B's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Real Ira
My Grandpa Pellitier had the misfortune to fight in WWI and survived a lot of craptastic horrors including crawling his way back from behind enemy lines and being mustard gassed and losing a toe to trench foot
. He had a very cool dagger some German prisoner had made for him out of an artillery band. He used it as a letter opener. I only know of this because I had marveled at the beauty and craftsmanship of it and he shared it's history with me. I remember asking if he was scared the prisoner would use it to kill him and escape. He just laughed and told me he let them clean his rifle too, explaining that those poor bastards had it so much better off as prisoners that they were delighted to be prisoners.

My Grandmother insisted the drawer full of medals be kept put away and not discussed because "boys heads should not be filled with war talk." I would give almost anything to hear of my grandfathers uncensored exploits.
On the 1-10 scale I consider all of the hardship in my life to be about a 2 to his 9, and I have been through some s***
Great story, I remember reading about these combatants sometimes crossing the lines to celebrate holidays, sharing food, drink etc and a day or so later going back to slaughter one another, war is really weird sometimes. PBS has a great tv series on that war to end all wars, great viewing for sure.
Apr 20, 2016, 07:37 AM
Useful Idiot
Quote:
Originally Posted by Libelle201B
Great story, I remember reading about these combatants sometimes crossing the lines to celebrate holidays, sharing food, drink etc and a day or so later going back to slaughter one another, war is really weird sometimes. PBS has a great tv series on that war to end all wars, great viewing for sure.
The truce was mainly enjoted by enlsted soldiers and very much frowned upon by the officer class who saw the fraternisation as dangerous.
Apr 20, 2016, 10:00 AM
Alarm Bells Softening!
Big Foot 48's Avatar
The wife-unit saw this article the other day on the horrors of WWI at the Battle of the Somme and read this paragraph to me to improve my education:
Quote:
But the British strolled, as they were ordered to. The generals had decreed that a walking pace would keep the raw recruits steady and in line. And what was the rush anyway, since all the Germans were presumed dead, killed by the bombardment?

This was a terrible error of judgment. On that first day alone, 20,000 British soldiers were killed and 40,000 were wounded, making it the worst day in British military history.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...#ixzz46NYhZPj4
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
More of the Somme: http://www.ramsdale.org/somme.htm
Apr 20, 2016, 10:08 AM
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Buran's Avatar
Trench warfare is horrible, especially when machine guns were introduced. I've read about the trenches dug all around Richmond during the U.S. civil war, no thanks.
Apr 20, 2016, 10:38 AM
Suspended Account
Quote:
Originally Posted by Real Ira
My Grandpa Pellitier had the misfortune to fight in WWI and survived a lot of craptastic horrors including crawling his way back from behind enemy lines and being mustard gassed and losing a toe to trench foot
. He had a very cool dagger some German prisoner had made for him out of an artillery band. He used it as a letter opener. I only know of this because I had marveled at the beauty and craftsmanship of it and he shared it's history with me. I remember asking if he was scared the prisoner would use it to kill him and escape. He just laughed and told me he let them clean his rifle too, explaining that those poor bastards had it so much better off as prisoners that they were delighted to be prisoners.

My Grandmother insisted the drawer full of medals be kept put away and not discussed because "boys heads should not be filled with war talk." I would give almost anything to hear of my grandfathers uncensored exploits.
On the 1-10 scale I consider all of the hardship in my life to be about a 2 to his 9, and I have been through some s***
2 of my great grandfathers fought in WW1. I had the privilege knowing and talking to one. He was a decorated cavaliere del vittorio Veneto.

2 years in trenches he spent.

Exchanging cigarettes with Austrians at the front trenches..
Apr 20, 2016, 01:52 PM
Love & a Molotov cocktail
Punkie's Avatar
My Grandad on my Dads side was in WW1, went over to France three times, came back each time on a stretcher.

No stories about the trenches, but he had started on a horse, then they got put on bicycles and he finished on a motorbike, though according to one story when the were on cycles, he had the job of looking after the officers motorbike, if they had a long ride the next day the officer would find his motorbike was difficult to start, so he had to ride off on my Grandads cycles, while my Grandad fixed the motorbike.
He caught up with them at lunchtime, having spent most of the morning drinking tea

Another story he told me was about spending time with his unit rounding up a bunch of escaped prisoners, I innocently asked about taking them back to the camp "no, we didn't bother wi that, we just stuck um up against the nearest wall and shot um."

Different times.


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