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Apr 04, 2016, 08:48 AM
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Greg,
I placed my order on Sunday but the group shipping could really save us something. Maybe Josef could check into that for us. I just have to remember to put money in my PP account.

Pete
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Apr 04, 2016, 09:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PDARR
Greg,
I placed my order on Sunday but the group shipping could really save us something. Maybe Josef could check into that for us. I just have to remember to put money in my PP account.

Pete
Hi Pete,

I can send up to 4 kits in a box.
Shipping:
4 kits (> 5 kg ) = 49 EUR
1-3 kits (< 5 kg) = 35 EUR

Josef
Apr 04, 2016, 05:21 PM
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Thread OP

Slite Fuselage - Finish


I have elected to finish my Slite in fiberglass and epoxy. The reason has to do with the rough fields we fly off of, here in the South West. There are lighter finishes, for sure; most of which are much easier and quicker to apply than what I intend to do. In fact, if you are a dab hand at Ultracote, that would probably be the best finish: Pretty quick, good looking and durable enough. Even so, I have built other airplanes from Josef, and met the design weight using the method I am about to show you here.

Remember the masking tape? Well, it comes into its own, here. I grabbed a hobby-vise and put it in my work stand, and the vise holds the taped boom.

I cut strips of glass cloth for top, (three pieces), bottom (one piece) and both sides (one piece each side). I made no attempt to cut close outlines or adhere to fancy seams. All the overlaps, ragged edges, baby's hair-type whiskers and excess goes away once the epoxy cures, and we finish sand before painting.

The criteria for sizing each piece is to (1) overlap the seems where the longerons peek through; and (2) over lap each other. In fact, there will be no less than five or six layers around the nose before we are done with this part.

I mixed a new batch of West Systems epoxy for each sequence: top, then bottom, then one side and then the other side. Afterwards, I used small pieces of scrap to cover any bare patches of balsa. I applied glass directly over the tow hook slot, and the hatch latch.

The result looks very not like a good-looking airplane, but please be assured: it cleans up just fine after the glass cures. I will use either a sharp razor blade or some fine sand paper.
Apr 04, 2016, 09:24 PM
Registered User
Hi Greg,

So when the PURES craze took off I ordered two kits from Joseph, and sadly with two kids and a house remodel that's not going as quickly as my wife would like the kits are still in the box. But that's not a complaint.

The PURES still looks awesome. However, and this should not be read as a dig in anyway, yet, the new Slite is miles ahead of the PURES and now makes the PURES look like an ancient gentle lady in comparison. So now I'll have to get a couple of slites to go with my PURES'.

BTW, have you ever considered putting some 1.7 kevlar on the bottom of the fuse for hard landings?

Just curious, and keep up "gods" work.

Cheers,

Steve
Apr 04, 2016, 10:41 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
Steve:

I know how family issues work. As long as family is first, you will do fine. Guess how I know.

As for things on the bottom, I've tried a number of different items, and flown off some amazing surfaces. In Las Vegas, we flew in a flood basin that was level and broad, but covered in crushed rock. If you missed the carpet we tacked down for landings, you lost about a 1/16 inch on each landing. The best we found was to use nylon blocks, drilled and hard-mounted with screws just behind the tow hook, along with vinyl trim from an auto parts store. The vinyl trim came with very sticky backing - just peel off and put some under the nose. Ugly? Sure, but you conserved sailplane material.

With the fiberglass finish, it's possible to land in hard dirt without too much fuss or damage. It's hard, tedious work but the best I've found for these parts.

Are you good with covering? Try Ultracote on the fuselage. It should work well.

Yours, Greg
Apr 04, 2016, 11:27 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by glidermang
Steve:

I know how family issues work. As long as family is first, you will do fine. Guess how I know.

As for things on the bottom, I've tried a number of different items, and flown off some amazing surfaces. In Las Vegas, we flew in a flood basin that was level and broad, but covered in crushed rock. If you missed the carpet we tacked down for landings, you lost about a 1/16 inch on each landing. The best we found was to use nylon blocks, drilled and hard-mounted with screws just behind the tow hook, along with vinyl trim from an auto parts store. The vinyl trim came with very sticky backing - just peel off and put some under the nose. Ugly? Sure, but you conserved sailplane material.

With the fiberglass finish, it's possible to land in hard dirt without too much fuss or damage. It's hard, tedious work but the best I've found for these parts.

Are you good with covering? Try Ultracote on the fuselage. It should work well.

Yours, Greg
Hi Greg,

I'm actually much better with glass, resin, putty, and the like as a retired and recovering professional boat builder.

I can get by with covering, though it's always a struggle.

One other thing I found at the RC car place was this ultra slick sticky back plastic. Sort of like UHMW but only about 1/64 thick. We used it on our bungee launched slopers years ago.

Looking forward to your progress.

Cheers,

Steve
Apr 05, 2016, 03:26 PM
Hates Palm Trees
Wow! This build log has only been going for 2 weeks and already 2500+ looks.

Greg..................Keep up the great work!
Apr 05, 2016, 07:29 PM
Registered User
Greg,
I'm assuming that either tail version can be built from the kit. I didn't see a choice when I placed my order. Man that is a beauty of a kit.

Pete
Apr 05, 2016, 11:23 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
Pete:

We specified which tail when we ordered. Contact Josef to make sure you get what you want. Some of the parts come in either kit, but only a few, smaller ones.

Until I can weigh and fly the two kits on my bench right now, I cannot make any statement about advantages either way.

Yours, Greg
Apr 05, 2016, 11:48 PM
Registered User
Thread OP

Slite Fuselage - Finish


Today, after the epoxy cured overnight, I finished out the fuselages.

Like I pointed out earlier, there are easier, probably lighter finishes. The finish I did is tailored to local (rough) flying fields, and is designed to be durable first, pretty second. I am under the impression that all the people building these in Europe use Ultracote, not glass or paint.

After trimming off excess fiberglass (a new razor or #11 blade works well, followed by light sanding), I began once more sanding in earnest. I started with a block and 220 grit, then transitioned to a simple sheet of 220 grit. There will be lots of bumps, folds and valleys to knock down, and the goal is an overall, matt finish. Fortunately, the epoxy dust (while still toxic) is heavier than balsa dust, so settles to the ground quickly.

At this stage, I did the hatches and fuselages separately. Once sanded, I then re-fit each hatch onto its respective fuselage, and they staid on the fuselages to the end.

Once I was satisfied with the smoothness, I mixed some light weight spackle with a few drops of water, and made a slurry. Glop this on, nice and thick, and be sure to fill any voids or pockets. Spread it around with an old credit card or hotel room card. Wet enough, and it will fill any exposed glass weave you can see or feel. Let it set up about an hour, then start sanding once more. The spackle sands quickly and clean, and won't clog your paper.

When the spackle is smooth (and it feathers out very nicely), I used rattle can primer, Rust-Oleum, I think. The primer is difficult to sand, except with wet-or-dry, but if you've filled well with spackle, there won't be a need.

I finished out with two color coats, again, just using rattle-can paints with a satin finish.

The product won't be new-car-quality, but is tough and attractive. In this case, the V-tail model will have wings and tail covered in a mix of transparent and opaque red Ultracote, with black accents and hinge lines. The conventional tail model will be New Mexico Red-and-Yellow.

Sharp eyes will pick out that I have not finished the tail pylon for the conventional tailed model. I will try to finish that in Ultracote, not paint.
Apr 06, 2016, 10:08 AM
Registered User
slowmatch's Avatar
Lovely build Greg, and design Josef

Please can anyone tell me what the rib wood thickness is on the Slite and Pures? By the look of it they are not capped in anyway?

Thanks,
Jon
Apr 06, 2016, 10:17 AM
Registered User
vw4style's Avatar
2mm balsa and 2mm plywood
Apr 06, 2016, 12:04 PM
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slowmatch's Avatar
Thanks so that's slap between 1/16" and 3/32"
Apr 06, 2016, 12:51 PM
supreme being of leisure
ZAGNUT's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by slowmatch
Thanks so that's slap between 1/16" and 3/32"
5/64"

probably a bit of 5/32" balsa and ply in the kit as well.
Apr 06, 2016, 01:10 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
It's a German kit: all wood thicknesses are in millimeters. The thinnest balsa is 2mm, the thinnest plywood is 1mm.

Yours, Greg


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