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Mar 06, 2016, 05:17 PM
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5 volt supply for reciever on 12 volt battery?


Just wondering what people are using to supply 5 to 6 volts to there receivers when there using 12 volt batteries? I know a BEC can be used, but which one,thats if the ESC doesn't supply a separate cable to go to the receiver to supply the 5 to 6 volts. Also can anyone suggest what 12volt batteries and a good charger to use for the larger lead acids? I am talking mainly about these larger lead acid batteries for scale tugs and such. Thanks.
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Mar 06, 2016, 05:21 PM
Sea Dragon-Lover
Umi_Ryuzuki's Avatar
Dimension Engineering has some great switching regulators.
They don't burn off the excess voltage in heat, so they are very efficient.

This is the standard regulator,
https://www.dimensionengineering.com/products/de-sw050

And this one can supply 3amps and has an adjustable voltage setting.
https://www.dimensionengineering.com/products/de-swadj3

Depending on the size or amperage of battery you want, Gel cells come in a great variety.
Back up batteries for alarm systems or UPC are available in many home or hardware stores.
Batteries Plus locally have 1amp(1000mah) batteries and larger in 6 and 12 volts.

I typically use a wall wart from Batteries Plus for the lead acids.
They have them for 6 and 12 volts.
https://www.batteriesplus.com/charge...rker?q=charger


Last edited by Umi_Ryuzuki; Mar 06, 2016 at 05:27 PM.
Mar 06, 2016, 05:35 PM
Registered User
Might want to try M.A.C.K.ís, BEC unit # L27x5.
http://www.mackproductsrc.com/radios_p2.htm
Mar 06, 2016, 06:22 PM
Registered User
Also Castle Creations has one that is adjustable and puts out 10 amps so you can run as many aux servo's, switches, etc. as you can dream up.
Mar 06, 2016, 08:58 PM
Registered User
Guard-Officer's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikes112
Just wondering what people are using to supply 5 to 6 volts to there receivers when there using 12 volt batteries? I know a BEC can be used, but which one,thats if the ESC doesn't supply a separate cable to go to the receiver to supply the 5 to 6 volts. Also can anyone suggest what 12volt batteries and a good charger to use for the larger lead acids? I am talking mainly about these larger lead acid batteries for scale tugs and such. Thanks.
I am pretty sure almost every ESC in teh Marine market has a BEC built in and will supply your receiver the necessary voltage to run with only the control wire plugged in. no need for additional wires. Unless you want to run a very large number of servo`s for functions, there shouldn`t be a need for any additional BEC.
That being said, a dedicated BEC provides more current for those extra functions and is apparently more reliable. Though I have not had any issue with the stronger/ better built esc`s.

Cheers
G-O
Mar 06, 2016, 09:38 PM
Registered User
Pololu makes a wide variety of electronic whizz bangs.

Voltage regulators https://www.pololu.com/category/131/...age-regulators

I also like their RC switches and multiplexers https://www.pololu.com/category/142/rc-switches

In Australia I get them from http://core-electronics.com.au/
Mar 07, 2016, 12:53 AM
Registered User
CaptCB's Avatar
I will second CaptLee's choice.
I put the heavy duty one (20A) in a friends tug, almost 4 years ago. The 10A, will work fine for most tugs and workboats. It is designed for 7a "continuous draw," on 12v input.
Mar 07, 2016, 08:14 AM
Registered User
Robert Pulse's Avatar

Ubec


Mike
What radio system are you using?
Im just curious as i have never had any problem with powering my recievers with the electronic speed controls. If you are using speed controls like the old dumas mechanical ones you would need a separate power supply, but most new ones support battery eliminator circuits. Am i missing something that you are trying to power and thus the need for a ubec?
Bob
I stand corrected, i did have an instance with a robbe dusseldorf that was drawing 19 amps and kept cutting off. I had too big of a prop on the drives. I had to disconnect the power from the speed control and use a separate battery for the reciever.
Last edited by Robert Pulse; Mar 07, 2016 at 08:21 AM.
Mar 07, 2016, 02:31 PM
Registered User
CaptCB's Avatar
If you read the OP, he is using a speed control that DOES NOT, have a BEC circuit. Common, on some of the more heavy duty speed controls designed to work at voltages above 7.2.
Also, IF you are using 1 or 2, "extreme duty" servo's, a ESC, with a BEC system, with a rating of 2-2.5 amps (standard rating), won't cut it. capntroy, and I are using servo's on our rudders, that under extreme use, on 6v, can draw 2.0+ amps. PER, servo. Years ago, we "smoked" the BEC circuit, on a very expensive ESC, because, we did not take this into consideration.
Mar 07, 2016, 07:42 PM
Registered User
Robert Pulse's Avatar

Bec


I guess I never saw the need for a servo that would need that much power to operate. I understand speed controls without bec but why does your rudder servo need that much power? How large is the boat /ship your steering? Is it a tug or is it a go fast boat? I know some go fast boats need stronger servos but most of the boats i have had you could blow on a disconnected rudder and it would easily move. Sorry i missed the non bec speed control.
I have even used the cheapy proboat speed controls on 12 volt sealed lead acid batteries of all different sizes and have only smoked one due to seaweed getting into the props.
Bob
Last edited by Robert Pulse; Mar 07, 2016 at 07:55 PM.
Mar 07, 2016, 08:08 PM
Sea Dragon-Lover
Umi_Ryuzuki's Avatar
On two of my boats, the SDM tug, and the VS drive Fireboat, both need more
amperage than the average ESC bec can provide.

The SDM because the steerable drives can be overpowered by the drive shaft.
So the servos need to be high torqe metal gear servos. Otherwise the drives, or
rudder, will rotate as the model reaches full rpm on the motors.

The VS drives are running four servos to control the pitch of the drive blades.
So they will over tax an ESC bec, and cause a brown out leaving the boat intermittently dead in the water.

Mar 07, 2016, 09:19 PM
Registered User
Robert Pulse's Avatar

Vs drives


Umi
Are you using 12 volt lead acid or lipos? Vs drives dont count lol. Different animal all together your using two vs drives are you not? Two servos each? In order to make them work properly you need high torque for them to be effective. If you used standard servos it would make them much harder to control. I agree on a tug of any size, stronger servos would be needed. I look at my one meter that uses a quarter scale servo for the sheets, but i use 4 duracell aa batteries and change them maybe two times a year.
Last edited by Robert Pulse; Mar 07, 2016 at 09:40 PM.
Mar 07, 2016, 09:41 PM
Registered User
CaptCB's Avatar
One tug that I built a few years back, has a nozzle, that like most of the boats I build, turns 45-50 degrees, EITHER side of center. At full throttle, & full over, it is putting a lot of pressure on the servo. So, just like Aimee, we use servo's that are: heavy duty, high speed, metal geared. and duel ball bearing. They are approx, 94 to 130+ oz in, on 6v. Even our 12'' Truckables, have a ball bearing servo, in the upper 70 oz in range, almost, 1.75 times, a "standard" servo.
Mar 07, 2016, 09:58 PM
Registered User
Robert Pulse's Avatar

High torque


I presume my new 2x springer is going to have a problem then as it has a standard servo and a 3.5 in prop and a 4 inch square rudder. Power is an airplane starter motor. Twin 15 amp hr sealed lead acid batteries 12 volt. Dynamite crawler esc with bec.
Btw it was running on one of the pro boat esc's when I got it.
Bob
Apr 17, 2016, 09:20 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
Thank you for all your advice. In response to Robert Pulse, I am using Novak's Super Roosters, and it seems to work great. Actually I am able to repair them if any one needs as I have already repaired a few and have already replaced some of the mosfets in them. I use that and Futaba's 27 Mhz am 4 channel systems. Question I now have is I can hook up 6 cell 1.2 volt nicad or ni-mh batteries for 7.2 volts with no problems, and according to the Super Rooster specs I can hook up to 10 cells for a total of 12 volts. So I did hook up a bench top power supply and powered a Super Rooster at 12.3 volts with no problem, but when I hooked up a 12 volt lead acid battery it melts the connector right away and there are sparks when I am attaching the battery? I did measure 12.8 volts on the lead acid battery which is not too far from 12.3 volts, and the voltage drops when you hook up a load. So what am I doing wrong with the lead acid battery? I hear a lot of people using 12 volt systems in there boats. The bench top supply is not limited in terms of current supply. Here's a link to the Super Rooster.
http://www.teamnovak.com/download/in...ter_superr.pdf
Last edited by mikes112; Apr 17, 2016 at 09:49 PM.


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