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Feb 26, 2016, 01:09 AM
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Smashed my drone, need some advice :)


Hey guys!
I bought a Ninja 250 drone from Helipal not long ago.
I was flying it with relative ease until I panicked a little and crashed it.

I seem to have ceased two motors and snapped an arm. I was wondering if anyone could give me any information on how to Change motors and also how to tell if the esc is still working.
Any information would be fantastic!
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Feb 26, 2016, 01:32 PM
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Sator Codex's Avatar
Im not sure im the man.
But post some pictures might help.
Feb 26, 2016, 07:52 PM
Effort weeds out idiots.
flyandride's Avatar
Helipal's website says it's a one piece main frame but it's hard to tell from the pictures. They show a lot of parts but no arms or frame. You may have to buy another frame and move everything over. They have the motor on their site.
Feb 26, 2016, 08:30 PM
Registered User
I usually find the easiest way to test motors and ESCs is by connecting a motor I know is working to an ESC on the arm I'm not sure about. If the motor works it's a bad motor. If the motor doesn't work it could be the ESC or wiring to the ESC.
Feb 27, 2016, 06:42 AM
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blis's Avatar
I would step by step power up each device separately and ensure none of the magic smoke escapes. You dont want to connect a suspect ESC, to a CF or vice versa or even have a Motor hooked to a bad ESC or RX

Start with PDB, the CF, RX, then ESC and then Motor. The motor windings will show signs of insualtion damage if they are bad, or bearings shaft etc.. RC Model Reviews has a video on LC motor testing, it checks the inductance to ensure the three phases are all the same. From there the motor is pretty much mechanical, shaft and bearings.
Feb 27, 2016, 10:03 PM
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Thread OP
Thanks or your help guys.
The arms are screwed to the frame, which is good.
I got in touch with helipal and they said they are waiting for the spare parts for the ninja to come in.
At very least there will be spares on the way.
I'll have a look at some videos.
I just have to teach myself soldering now haha!
Feb 27, 2016, 10:18 PM
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blis's Avatar
ChocFrog,

Soldering is all about temperature and having enough of it to heat both points of contact and you often feel you should have been born an octopus to do it properly.

Some tips:

The most important tip I can give you with soldering is to remove some of what is already and always clean your tip adding more fresh (pre fluxed) solder to help with more surface area and heat transfer between the iron and that which you are soldering. Use the lead stuff if you want to make life easier, Green is hard to use. Buy some solder removing braid to help you get existing solder off cleanly. GOOT is good.

Pre tin every wire and connection, place the soldering iron at 90 degree to the wire, and dab each side of the iron until the solder bridges and melds across the wire. This is where heat comes into play, a 60 what iron is essential for heavier gauge wires and a flat side tip is better than a pointy on.

When soldering to boards, apply the tip of the iron to pre-tinned board, it will sink heat faster than a wire and if you don't you'll get a cold solder. A cold solder doesn't have a shiny finish.

I like using blutac to hold wires in place, it can be anything, a vice, pair of vice grips, soldering helping hands, or whatever you can find to give you the third and fourth hand. Two people soldering can be three times quicker, specially when you are new at it, so find a friend.

Lastly prepare to heat shrink over all wired connections, it's likely if you don't have the array of irons or a good variable temp iron you'll burn some of the insulation back and expose wires, the heat shrink will insulate them. If it's taking longer than six seconds, there's not enough heat, it's going to happen, don't stress, it's only a guide to let you know if you're hot enough or not.

When using the iron, always clean the tip before each solder, contamination is your biggest enemy. When you've finished, leave the iron coated in solder to protect the tip from oxidising.

Good luck.
Feb 28, 2016, 04:03 AM
Registered User
Thread OP
Thanks a lot for the info blis!
That will come in handy! Simple trial and error I guess, I'm not worried about failing at it, if you don't fail, you don't learn.
Thanks again!
Feb 28, 2016, 04:20 AM
Registered User
blis's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chocolatefrog
Thanks a lot for the info blis!
That will come in handy! Simple trial and error I guess, I'm not worried about failing at it, if you don't fail, you don't learn.
Thanks again!
Use the solder sucking braid, don't over heat it, if it goes pear shaped at first, suck it off and try again.


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