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Dec 17, 2015, 05:59 PM
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Poke it wAstick's Avatar
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Need a laugh? Read the FAA IFR. Here are a few gems.


I encourage people to scroll thru the actual FAA regulation.

Some of it is pretty funny.

Some of it less so.
http://www.faa.gov/news/updates/media/20151213_IFR.pdf


Here are a few things that I found entertaining:

Average model fleet size:
“On average, model aircraft owners are assumed to own an average fleet size of 1.5 sUAS.”
Page 180.


These new regulations are going to save us a lot of money:
“Table 7: Cost Savings of the Baseline versus the Part 48 Rulemaking ($M)”

These new regulations are going to save us (hobby & commercial uas pilots) $327,000,000 over the next 5 years.

That’s right. According to the FAA, the old system ,where hobby pilots don’t register, would cost uas pilots (hobby & commercial) $382,000,000 thru 2020. The new regulations will cost us only $55,000,000.

So be thankful. The FAA is going to save us millions!


A recommendation by Del Air for registration:
New UASs are locked. Turn on your new UAS in an area with wi-fi. The UAS will detect that it is unregistered and contacts the FAA website. The owner will enter their registration info into the UAS. The FAA will text a code to the owner’s phone. The owner enters the code in the UAS to unlock it. Happy flying.
Page 165.


Have your papers:
“The agency notes, however, that during operation of the sUAS, a Certificate of Aircraft Registration must be readily available to the person operating the sUAS, so that they may provide it to federal, state, or local law enforcement when requested.”
Page 133.
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Dec 17, 2015, 06:11 PM
Crash 'em if you got 'em
waytooslow's Avatar
I love how they cherry pick section 336. leave out the part of the FAA being preventing from rule making
Dec 17, 2015, 07:36 PM
Registered User
Atomic Skull's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Poke it wAstick

Average model fleet size:
“On average, model aircraft owners are assumed to own an average fleet size of 1.5 sUAS.”
Ahahahahahaha. NOBODY has just *1* model let alone "1.5"

Quote:
Originally Posted by Poke it wAstick


A recommendation by Del Air for registration:
New UASs are locked. Turn on your new UAS in an area with wi-fi. The UAS will detect that it is unregistered and contacts the FAA website. The owner will enter their registration info into the UAS. The FAA will text a code to the owner’s phone. The owner enters the code in the UAS to unlock it. Happy flying.
Page 165.
How exactly is that going to work with an RC helicopter airframe kit that is sold as box of unassembled CNC aluminum and carbon fiber parts with no electronics?
Dec 17, 2015, 08:44 PM
Master of the Figure "9"
hogflyer's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomic Skull
Ahahahahahaha. NOBODY has just *1* model let alone "1.5"



How exactly is that going to work with an RC helicopter airframe kit that is sold as box of unassembled CNC aluminum and carbon fiber parts with no electronics?
They have to pass more rules and laws for you to know how.....
Dec 18, 2015, 03:19 PM
Foam Wrecker
BillBlair's Avatar
The "cost savings" to the taxpayer allowed by this new rule are actually the "cost savings" due to the use of a web site instead the paper registration path. The total government and registrant resource cost of the rule is $56 million through 2020.

http://www.faa.gov/news/updates/media/20151213_IFR.pdf

C. Summary of Costs and Benefits

In order to implement the new streamlined, web-based system described in this IFR, the FAA will incur costs to develop, implement, and maintain the system. Small UAS owners will require time to register and mark their aircraft, and that time has a cost. The total of government and registrant resource cost for small unmanned aircraft registration and marking under this new system is $56 million ($46 million present value at 7 percent) through 2020.

In evaluating the impact of this interim final rule, we compare the costs and benefits of the IFR to a baseline consistent with existing practices: for modelers, the exercise of discretion by FAA (not requiring registration) and continued broad public outreach and educational campaign, and for non-modelers, registration via part 47 in the paper-based system. Given the time to register aircraft under the paper-based system and the projected number of sUAS aircraft, the FAA estimates the cost to the government and non-modelers would be about $383 million.

The resulting cost savings to society from this IFR equals the cost of this baseline policy ($383 million) minus the cost of this IFR ($56 million), or about $327 million ($259 million in present value at a 7 percent discount rate). These cost savings are the net quantified benefits of this IFR.


Treatment of the Value of Preventing Fatalities and Injuries in Preparing Economic Analyses

https://www.faa.gov/regulations_poli...ary%202008.pdf

"The mean of these five values is $5.8 million, which we believe would appropriately reflect the conclusions of recent studies as well as the practice of other agencies."

So, in order for that probably low ball estimate of $56 million spent on the program over five years to be economically viable according to the FAA's own value per human life figures, the rule will need to save two lives every year.

How many have died thus far? ZERO. How likely will pilot registration be in preventing deaths. Near ZERO, IMO.


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