Thread Tools
Feb 05, 2020, 03:03 PM
Out Standing In The Field
RexGalore's Avatar
Any old, crappy ESC with even just a linear BEC from the junk box always works for me.
Easy to find, no work, free.
Sign up now
to remove ads between posts
Feb 10, 2020, 09:06 AM
I Look, Listen, and Learn
Timbo383's Avatar
Thread OP
There are lots of ideas for the pin cushions, but alot of times I only need a couple of pins and this takes up minumim space....and it looks kinda stylish. A wine cork (free after you drink up the bottle) hot glued to the corner of my work space.
Feb 10, 2020, 09:23 AM
A Day @ a Time - Matt. 6:25-34
ruff1's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timbo383
There are lots of ideas for the pin cushions, but alot of times I only need a couple of pins and this takes up minumim space....and it looks kinda stylish. A wine cork (free after you drink up the bottle) hot glued to the corner of my work space.
Oh boy, just what I need! I was wondering how to handle this. Off to my CFO to ask him to bring me a cork since I don't drink.

Much appreciated!
Feb 13, 2020, 03:19 PM
Registered User
PC Pilot's Avatar
Micromark charges $50 for their 3 3/8 inch carbide blade. I have had enough of that and made an adapter to use the larger arbor trim saw blades. Don't remember what the Craftsman bladed had cost but found another one at Home Depot for $22.

Material used is hobby shop aluminum sheet and Gorilla tape. The tape is used as a spacer because the new blade is thinner than the old one and I couldn't sand the adapter thin enough without 2 of them taking flight into the nether world. A knife was held to the running blade to trim the extra tape.
Last edited by PC Pilot; Feb 14, 2020 at 08:07 PM.
Feb 19, 2020, 11:37 PM
Registered User
XDmToter's Avatar
Sorry if something like this has already been posted... No time to read through 350 pages of posts.

Dental Floss Control Horns.
Feb 20, 2020, 02:42 AM
Youtube channel : solentlifeuk
solentlife's Avatar
With the 'Flossers' you can even leave the short legs and bury those into the foam making the 'horn' stand proud and forward for such as flaps ..
Feb 20, 2020, 04:41 AM
Danish? Don't U eat that??
DKChris's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by XDmToter
Sorry if something like this has already been posted... No time to read through 350 pages of posts.
Shouldn't keep anyone from posting ideas IMO; More often than not, every time someone adds a "repost", it tends to add his (or her) own little twist to the general idea, possibly improving and diversifying it for everyone, and maybe even spawning new ideas in the minds of the readers. So I say keep 'em coming!


My 2 €-cent:
The flossers I can get do not have the built in toothpick in the handle, so the whole handle can be used to create longer control horns. And I have so far left the short legs partially or completely on, as they let you angle the handle part more in/forward or outward to both allow the horn to be attached far back from the hinge, which can sometimes add strength if the surface is a bit flimsy, and adjust the arm control horn for more or less "gearing" of the control, reduced control rod strain and all that more theoretical stuff. But that means you are always working with fairly large horns.

Must admit I had totally overlooked the simple fact that it also makes a fine blank for smaller horns, the way you do it. So I guess these flossers basically make a one-stop fast solution for most sizes of horns for light foamies. Perfect!
Last edited by DKChris; Feb 20, 2020 at 04:57 AM.
Feb 20, 2020, 06:11 AM
Too old to rock-n-roll...
TooJung2Die's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by XDmToter
No time to read through 350 pages of posts.
Click on View all Images in thread in any post with a photo. Posts with ideas have photos attached. You get six easy to browse pages of photos. Click on the photo that interests you. Then click on "View post" under the photo to take you to that single post.

Kind of separates the wheat from the chaff.
Feb 20, 2020, 06:55 AM
A Day @ a Time - Matt. 6:25-34
ruff1's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by TooJung2Die
Click on View all Images in thread in any post with a photo. Posts with ideas have photos attached. You get six easy to browse pages of photos. Click on the photo that interests you. Then click on "View post" under the photo to take you to that single post.

Kind of separates the wheat from the chaff.
This very old dog learned a new trick, thanks!
Feb 20, 2020, 07:09 AM
I Look, Listen, and Learn
Timbo383's Avatar
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by XDmToter
Sorry if something like this has already been posted... No time to read through 350 pages of posts.

Dental Floss Control Horns.
Yes it's been posted, but you are the first to show detailed pictures on how it done, so you get the credit for being first on that.
I personally like to use the gift cards from retail outlets for my smaller plane's horns. You get a variety of colors and patterns when you "shop" around for them.
Feb 25, 2020, 05:28 AM
Registered User

Magic repair stuff


Hopefully, this is not a repeat, nor a copy of someone else's great idea. Anyway, as I posted pn my own club's site:

I think I deserve the Nobel "Piece" Prize for this (little pun there, in case you missed it).
I had a plane that encountered a hard object and suffered scraping and gouging outboard on the wing. Some bits of foam were missing or permanently compressed, so it would require building up with something that was strong, light, sandable and paint worthy.

Two materials: light spackling compound and polyurethane glue (Gorilla glue or other brand). Spackling has water in it; water is the accelerant and foaming agent for polyurethane glue. A perfect match.

Put a dab of spackling onto something. Add a drop of the glue. The ratio is minimal glue to spackle. Mix thoroughly. Apply to the affected area with a spatula, broken prop or credit card, squeeze it into any crack and build it up just a bit for now. Do not be overly generous, as this mixture will expand somewhat. You will have a few minutes of working time before the mixture starts to stiffen.

Wait a few minutes. Notice the expansion. Go back and press it down some, it takes awhile to become really hard. Don't worry about getting things perfectly even.

Now, or perhaps in a little while, make up another small batch and apply it to build up more, if needed. Again, wait, etc.

After the repaired area is filled, it will be easy to slice and/or sand off any excess. Apart from slight colouration, the repaired area can be perfect in appearance and strength. Paint adheres to it. It is at least water resistant, if not 100% waterproof (if you dunk your plane, it should not matter, just don't expect it to sit submerged overnight and still be OK).

This repair sets much quicker than spackling by itself, it is stronger than just spackling, practically as strong as the poly glue by itself and neater than gobs of hot glue.
This is a great way to repair foam, balsa, etc. Easy to work with and quite strong - stronger than the surrounding structure.
Feb 25, 2020, 07:58 AM
Youtube channel : solentlifeuk
solentlife's Avatar
A variation on the Spackling with PU glue is just glue mixed with water .....

We all have nose cones that end up cracked / smashed / split and we all wish we had filled them before flying ..

Well ... pour PU glue in ... bit of water and mix ... ... let it foam up ....... best do it in small bits so you don't have it overflowing !!

Here's the test I did with old crap nose by side ....



I 3D printed new nose and filled it ... I let it fill all to the top and then using hot knife cut back to fit the front of model in ...



That nose will now outsurvive the model !!
Feb 25, 2020, 09:44 AM
Registered User
Peteohms's Avatar
Deer slayer, I posted this in December. The first time I posted this was November 2004. I developed this technique when I was building blue fan fold fomies.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Deerslayer
Hopefully, this is not a repeat, nor a copy of someone else's great idea. Anyway, as I posted pn my own club's site:

I think I deserve the Nobel "Piece" Prize for this (little pun there, in case you missed it).
I had a plane that encountered a hard object and suffered scraping and gouging outboard on the wing. Some bits of foam were missing or permanently compressed, so it would require building up with something that was strong, light, sandable and paint worthy.

Two materials: light spackling compound and polyurethane glue (Gorilla glue or other brand). Spackling has water in it; water is the accelerant and foaming agent for polyurethane glue. A perfect match.
.......
Feb 25, 2020, 05:47 PM
I Look, Listen, and Learn
Timbo383's Avatar
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peteohms
Deer slayer, I posted this in December. The first time I posted this was November 2004. I developed this technique when I was building blue fan fold fomies.
Well, I guess it just proves the "great minds think alike " theory.
Feb 27, 2020, 06:28 AM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by Timbo383
Well, I guess it just proves the "great minds think alike " theory.
Or, as my father used to say, as a second part of that expression, " and fools seldom differ."

I did mention up front that this may not have been my original idea. I certainly want to give credit to the real inventor of this process. It has helped me with a couple of very nasty repairs, as well as saving a couple of other fellows' toys from going into the dumper.

As Yogi Bera once said, this is like deja vu all over again. (Or, was it Yogi Bear that said it? See, there I go again!)


Quick Reply
Message:

Thread Tools