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Mar 31, 2016, 04:28 AM
Youtube channel : solentlifeuk
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac50L
Bakelite - I couldn't remember the plastic type name this morning, too grey haired is the problem.

The newer ones in nylon, when you undo the screws, nothing happens (so the screw can't get lost) so you have to force the screw out or cut the nylon to get the brass body part (that you want) out.
Yes agreed but its no problem. Quick few strokes with a hobby knife and job done.

Whats nice about the nylon ones ... the size range compared to the old Bakelite ones.

Nigel
Latest blog entry: Difference of Forums
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Apr 01, 2016, 12:10 PM
I Look, Listen, and Learn
Timbo383's Avatar
Going try to link a video I discovered.
exacto knife jig (2 min 8 sec)

Wow, it works, getting better at this Internet stuff
Apr 01, 2016, 09:42 PM
Registered User
Stumbled onto the webpage below that has a wide variety of home made tools. Some are relevant to scratch building such as foam cutters, model building, vacuum forming, paint booths, etc. If you have some spare time - there are some interesting ideas there.

http://www.homemadetools.net/categories
Apr 02, 2016, 09:06 AM
I Look, Listen, and Learn
Timbo383's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by fishflying
Stumbled onto the webpage below that has a wide variety of home made tools. Some are relevant to scratch building such as foam cutters, model building, vacuum forming, paint booths, etc. If you have some spare time - there are some interesting ideas there.

http://www.homemadetools.net/categories
Thanks for that link, gonna take a while to go thru all that.
Apr 04, 2016, 02:13 AM
Watt Waster
Tsavah's Avatar

Easy Bake - PVC Pipe


Quote:
Originally Posted by psychedvike
I picked up an electric oven on the free list on craigslist. ... My biggest problem is finding space in my garage. ... If you do grab one like I did just be sure to wire it correctly.
An oven is an expensive option since it costs to use, buy, place, and repair on the rare occasion. Even worse, it is often too small for the task when PVC pipe, or some other plastic needs to be warmed up. A little background on my experiment - I needed to warm and shape 7' long PVC pipe pieces for a tent frame project. My solution - a plywood box with scrape foam glued on the outside. The plywood box only needs to be as wide as the desired shape of the item to be made, so mine only needed to be 4' x 4'x 8'. I was using 1" schedule 40 PVC pipe cut to 7' lengths I wanted to curve, but not flatten. The pipe did have a little give, but as soon as I let go they would spring back to straight. I used 1"x 2" wood to outline the box parts so I could assemble it with screws. That way it would be easy to take apart for storage later until needed again. I did put one sheet of plywood on the top so any heat that collected inside would stay put for a while. I elevated the wood oven about 12" above a small, tail gate party BBQ grill I place in the center. I had a few cinder blocks and wood scrap laying about, so I used them to elevate the wooden oven.

I put around 8 BBQ briskets in the small, thin metal, use once, or twice and throw away tail gate grill. Once the coals were going strong, I slid the grill under the box and let it heat up the pipe. The PVC pipe doesn't need a lot of heat to soften, but it is best to do the job slowly so as not to discolor, or burn a blister into the surface of the plastic. Of course you could use other heat sources to do the same thing, but I was being cheap. One option is a heat lamp, but you may want to slowly rotate the pipe until it becomes soft enough for forming. Others have used a combination of electric room heaters and hot hair guns that can blister paint for removal. I have also seen modern cavemen use an open wood fire to slowly warm PVC pipe as it was slowly rotated until it softened and then placed into a wooden form to make a bow for shooting arrows. Some use a more modern approach and heat sand, funnel it into the PVC pipe and once the pipe starts to deform, pour out the sand quickly and place the PVC pipe into a shaping form, normally made of wood. Many of those were used to flatten the pipe by used C clamps on the outside of the wood boards for the application of force.

There are other ways to do the same thing - heat form PVC pipe, but those are the most popular methods I know about.
Latest blog entry: Center of Gravity - Airplanes
Apr 04, 2016, 02:51 AM
Watt Waster
Tsavah's Avatar

Best Way to Glue with Urethane Adhesives


Quote:
Originally Posted by springer
... That's why many of us use Gorilla Glue white, ... It foams, though so you have to watch amount you use, and wipe up or pick off the expansion.
Foaming glues like the Gorilla brand urethane glue are often used as if a good filler due to the foaming action. That is a mistake and there are many videos about this, but they are normally found in wood working projects. Youtube has a wealth of information about urethane glue and some of the videos are comparing various glues commonly used in the RC airplane hobby. The catch is they tend to apply way too much urethane glue while conducting tests, so naturally it foams out of the joint and the common reaction is to say it is too messy. If you want a very strong bond using urethane glue there are three basic rules to follow - use only enough glue to apply a very thin film and make sure it is water mist cured under pressure with tight fitting joints. The type of joint can be a deciding factor and the butt joint is the weakest type, which is when urethane glue becomes the obvious king of glues.

If done well, urethane glue can recycle just about all of your scrap foam after cutting the pieces into 1" strips, or thinner strips when needed. If the strips are glued edge to edge over a form, jig, fixture, or what I call a build-over plug, or frame of a fuselage, or wing, you can make a very lightweight foam shell that is stiffer than the original foam board due to the many glue joints between the strips of foam board. The trick is the many foam seams are stiffer, yet lightweight and make the finished thin foam shell much stiffer.

Of course if you are still applying too much glue, it will foam out of the seam between the strips of foam board and it will be necessary to use common rubbing alcohol to wipe off the excess glue as it foams out of the joint. Once the urethane glue starts to stiffen, the alcohol is no longer effective and it becomes necessary to wait until the glue has fully cured. Not an easy fix, so the best thing to do is learn how to use very thin films of glue, a fine mist of water and tight fitting parts of foam. Once a builder/pilot learns how little urethane glue is needed in a tight fitting joint cured while under pressure after a fine mist of water, a small bottle will be more than enough to build six, or more park sized RC model airplanes even though there are a lot of edge to edge joints in the thin foam shell fuselage and wing.
Latest blog entry: Center of Gravity - Airplanes
Apr 04, 2016, 06:44 AM
I Look, Listen, and Learn
Timbo383's Avatar
On another subject about glue, I use gorilla glue and I would use a regular spray bottle and the water was more splattered than misted. Then I took one of my used up over the counter allergy nasal spray bottle and filled it with water. Now I get a very even fine spray mist and the gg foams up more uniformed. Much better then hyperventilating trying to breath on it
Apr 04, 2016, 09:29 AM
Youtube channel : solentlifeuk
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In fact PU glue only needs water if really dry. I rarely bother misting with water now, I use PU without. It foams and sets fine.

Nigel
Latest blog entry: Difference of Forums
Apr 04, 2016, 09:51 AM
I Look, Listen, and Learn
Timbo383's Avatar
Ok, here's a useful tip for glue guns for those that don't know....or didn't know, like me.....don't lay your gun on the side while it's on, glue can leak inside and gum up stuff interior of the gun. When I used it in a tight space, I needed more room so I would push back the kickstand and lay it down while I held the two pieces together, then set it back up afterwards. Repetitive times like that caused me to purchase a new gun. I opened the old one up and found a lot of glue had leaked inside. No wonder the gun felt heavier every time I used it, I thought I was just getting older and weaker.
Apr 04, 2016, 09:58 AM
treefinder
springer's Avatar
Great comments about Gorilla Glue! All the items about how little is needed is why I always tell folk the first time they use it, no matter how little they think they are using, they WILL use too much!

The method of adding moisture is also another interesting issue. I find that in winter when the inside air is dry is when I really need to add moisture. I have sprayed from bottle, used a tooth brush and alternately brushed or spritzed it, and used a moist washcloth and swiped the joint. They all work, though I think I like the washcloth best as it gets "just enough" but not too much most of the time. Like Solent, I find that in Michigan, in the summer, humidity is high enough to not need any additional water, so your local environment will determine how much you need.
Apr 04, 2016, 10:25 AM
serial scratchbuilder
Granted's Avatar
Hit your favorite garden center and get a $2 hygrometer, over 60% humidity and you don't need extra water.
Apr 04, 2016, 03:12 PM
Watt Waster
Tsavah's Avatar

Might be a Freebie, or Two - Ideas and Schemes


Quote:
Originally Posted by graywoulf
... I found out too that DTF does not necessarily stay flat when laminated even if laid out on a flat surface. I guess that I need to make some type of press to hold it flatter while the glue ( Dupont Super 77 ) dries. And which of all of the glues you guys have used do you think dries faster?
A while back I visited a recycle shop for building supplies. They had a nice collection of thick window glass of various sizes, so I bought around a dozen for $1 each. Glass is a really nice flat surface for all sorts of RC model airplane objectives, or needs. If you wax it with auto wax real good, most glues won't stick. Of course there is always the plastic food wrap and wax paper options. If I need to laminate two sheets of soft foam board, I tend to use urethane glue at a rate of one drop per square foot, spread it really thin with a gift, or credit card and remove as much as I can with newspaper bits until all that is left is a thin film. Of course you have to work quickly before the glue tries to start setting, but it is easier to place the next piece of foam board on the glued surface and place another thick sheet of glass on top until a few hours later. It is important to remember urethane glue will cure faster if a fine mist of water is applied to the surface first. Even the urethane foam in a can often used as a gap filler cures faster if the spot is misted with water before the foam is inserted.

I do use spray glue for mounting paper products, fabric netting, soft foam sheets, thin fiberglass cloth, and such to the surface of foam board and other materials. I often lightly spray both surfaces before they are pressed together, but it is important to apply a thin film of spray glue rather than a heavy application. Before the spray glue can start to set I like to use a firm foam roller, or even a paint roller on the outside surface to press the thin covering against the foam board. It helps work out wrinkles, bubbles, and other such defects in the lamination. If there is a chance the glue can get on the roller's surface, I first set in place a thin plastic food wrap layer, or wax paper to keep the roller clean. This is necessary if I am pressing fabric , or netting down on foam board since the glue can penetrate the weave, or netting and spoil the roller's surface if I don't.
Latest blog entry: Center of Gravity - Airplanes
Apr 04, 2016, 03:54 PM
Watt Waster
Tsavah's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by balsa or carbon
Also carbon fiber rod frames covered in mylar film or kite fabric .

This plane is carbon fiber frame covered in mylar film :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rLz5s73qNRE
That is a good example of what I would like to do in lightweight thin foam board, but outside when it isn't too breezy. If it is windy, all bets are off. So my focus is on super low wing loading, big airframe, and very likely a fragile model, like the one shown, except full fuselage rather than a profile. Seen a few examples of really big all foam model aircraft that were flown slow and graceful, but I don't think I can cart about a 6 foot fuselage just yet. Another one might have been a little larger. So far the best examples were jets using EDF motors. One idea that seems to be working out in the basic tests I have done suggest I will need to purchase a large supply of foam plates, cut out 5" squares from the center, and do a larger build-over plug, or frame to make a very thin foam shell. It will be a lot of urethane gluing to foam rings, but properly applied urethane glue doesn't add much weight, but stiffens the foam. Not a quick build process, but surprisingly effective as long as I don't need heavy RC gear. Still working out some details.
Latest blog entry: Center of Gravity - Airplanes
Apr 04, 2016, 04:07 PM
Watt Waster
Tsavah's Avatar

Rudder Too Small?


Quote:
Originally Posted by graywoulf
Well as per your request here are some pictures of my first "foamie" build. ... is 24"X24" basically. ... Comments and suggestions are most welcome and appreciated.
You are likely right about the rudder being a bit too small. Your design suggests you will be doing a lot of high alpha flying about at a low airspeed, which will limit how much influence the current rudder size will have. I am thinking a rudder that is around 30% taller might work better, but it will make the model a little more tail heavy. That may turn out to not be an issue since it sounds like you are using a monster battery pack. A flying disk like design that small with a large battery pack is likely to have a high wing loading, rather than a low wing loading normally used with these designs. Of course the maiden flight will tell all, but you may want to not install the RC gear until you have done a dozen test glides to determine where the best CG will be.
Latest blog entry: Center of Gravity - Airplanes
Apr 04, 2016, 07:03 PM
"Fly, yes... Land, No"
OutcastZeroOne's Avatar
Need a good source of good quality magnets or double sided tape? Look at your local high end car stereo shop. I work at one and these magnets are from replaced satellite radio antennas. The double sided tape and velcro I get from various kits. Back-up parking sensors and even some camera kits. This strip of double sided tape I got from a 3rd brake light camera kit for a Sprinter van.


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