Shop our Airplanes Products Drone Products Sales
Thread Tools
Dec 07, 2015, 04:46 AM
Registered User
Joseph3LK's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by RaymondM
All right now to get it in the air.
Looks a little unruly to be honest! lol

Flying Kraken!



just had to.
bro is that FFXI? i loved that game!
Sign up now
to remove ads between posts
Dec 07, 2015, 04:50 AM
Registered User
Levendis's Avatar
The street art Kraken is amazing...what is the location? Would love to see it in person.
Dec 07, 2015, 04:53 AM
Multirotor Promotor
RaymondM's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joseph3LK
bro is that FFXI? i loved that game!
Joeseph, don't rightly know friend, I just found it on a search . It is cool looking though.
Dec 07, 2015, 05:28 AM
Registered User
Joseph3LK's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by RaymondM
Joeseph, don't rightly know friend, I just found it on a search . It is cool looking though.
There was a godlike item called kraken club...that might be the boss that drops it

Long time back but memory tells me it was worth several million in game currency which amounted to several hundred real life dollars

Good memories...
Dec 07, 2015, 06:30 AM
Registered User
@Levendis - yes, we will mix it up, but a little later. Just keeping things simple at this stage. Ultimately, whilst it seems that I am running a study group, the intent is to ensure the Kraken frame design fundamentals are fully understood. There are far more qualified people than I and it would be quite embarrassing to overstretch my simplistic knowledge.

The street art has become very popular around Perth and Fremantle. My favourite remains the the giant numbat.

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=s...MQsAQILA&dpr=1

@thanks webbah and jlk - appreciate the interest
Dec 07, 2015, 10:44 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by boltrc
@Levendis - yes, we will mix it up, but a little later. Just keeping things simple at this stage. Ultimately, whilst it seems that I am running a study group, the intent is to ensure the Kraken frame design fundamentals are fully understood. There are far more qualified people than I and it would be quite embarrassing to overstretch my simplistic knowledge.

The street art has become very popular around Perth and Fremantle. My favourite remains the the giant numbat.

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=s...MQsAQILA&dpr=1

@thanks webbah and jlk - appreciate the interest
A guy I use to run in the same groups with is a big local artist. I think you would dig his work.

https://www.instagram.com/srilart/
Dec 07, 2015, 11:23 PM
Registered User
Joseph3LK's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by headrec
A guy I use to run in the same groups with is a big local artist. I think you would dig his work.

https://www.instagram.com/srilart/
wish we saw that sorta art on melbourne walls

all you see there is messy grafiti, nothing on par with that beautiful paint. thats real skill there
Dec 08, 2015, 12:34 AM
Forward Ever, Backward Never
fl0PPsy's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by boltrc
@Levendis - yes, we will mix it up, but a little later. Just keeping things simple at this stage. Ultimately, whilst it seems that I am running a study group, the intent is to ensure the Kraken frame design fundamentals are fully understood. There are far more qualified people than I and it would be quite embarrassing to overstretch my simplistic knowledge.

The street art has become very popular around Perth and Fremantle. My favourite remains the the giant numbat.

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=s...MQsAQILA&dpr=1
Some of my friends work on display in that link
Dec 08, 2015, 12:59 AM
Registered User
This is the same image as before where we analyzed the impact of feathering. Although this observation is not directly related to the feathering, the image does highlight an important point.

Consider the stress applied to the top and bottom 0.5mm surface as compared to the inner core of the arm.



Quote:
Originally Posted by boltrc
In this scenario, we model the impact of feathering of the root.

........
Last edited by boltrc; Dec 08, 2015 at 01:00 AM. Reason: Further Analysis of Arm Stress
Dec 09, 2015, 02:57 AM
Registered User
Interesting and very cool!


Does the top and bottom surface that take most the stress stay a constant thickness? or is it a percentage of the thickness of the arm?
Last edited by PeteG; Dec 09, 2015 at 03:34 AM.
Dec 09, 2015, 04:07 AM
Registered User
Yes, top (tensile) and bottom (compression) is taking the stress. ie. doing the hard work whereas the centre does very little.

Not sure I understand the rest of the question.
Dec 09, 2015, 04:15 AM
Multirotor Promotor
RaymondM's Avatar
I think he asks is there a uniform thickness for the arm at that point?
Dec 09, 2015, 04:25 AM
Registered User
Thanks. I will see if I can measure it. My guess is that the thickness will not change much as CF, whilst stiff with high tensile strength, does not handle deformation very well.
Dec 09, 2015, 05:24 AM
Registered User
Say the arm is 3mm thick total and the top and bottom parts that take most the stress (the green shaded areas in the pic) are say 0.5mm thick.

If the arm was 4mm, are the stressed layers (green shaded areas) still 0.5mm thick or do the stressed layers also increase in thickness?

Being carbon fibre... I have seen this before where you see the top or bottom "sheets" of the CF cracked and the middle just bent and/or delaminated. Definitely seems true that the top and bottom takes the most force.... thinking about it that true of any layered structure, which of course that's all CF is... as the epoxy resin is just a filler really....

Seems like there's a lot of carbon in there we are weighing down our quads with which is doing not much!
Dec 09, 2015, 05:25 AM
Registered User
Levendis's Avatar
The street art links are awesome. Thanks.

It would seem the takeaways from the diagrams are:
1. Quad arms should be feathered for optimised strength to weight ratios for arms.
2. The same arm is not 33% stronger when it is thickened from 3mm to 4mm

[crickets...]

For those who have destroyed more than a few quads we would also know from experience that the weak points are at the bottom plate (typically thinner in a non-unibody quad), the arm mounting screws and screwholes. And that the analysis should also take into account forces acting in the longitudinal axis in addition to the pitch axis. It would be great if your solid works elves could formalise that study! (i.e. optimum at three attachment M4 screws with washers and bottom plate that can be 50% as thick as the arms provided that there is a carbon finer brace?) Were those nylon screws on the old Blackout miniH a good idea after all?