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Feb 18, 2019, 06:56 PM
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Janusz Jawien's Avatar
The picture of boat I am dreaming and drooling....
This is a pretty big picture inviting you to take good look ...
Enjoy!
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Feb 18, 2019, 07:00 PM
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Gary Webb's Avatar
Zbip, You are correct that weather helm is when the boat wants to turn up into the wind.
I am right there alongside you to realize that we just have no way to know what the overall effect of the new sail plan will be. Rigging her up and setting sail is the only way to learn. Have no fear.
Cheers, Gary
Feb 21, 2019, 04:39 PM
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Zbip57's Avatar
For easier transport of the boat, it's nice to be able to retract the long bowsprit. But I find it's awkward to pull out and re-insert the brass rod which runs through the foot of the bowsprit between the samson posts. Mine fits in there quite snug.

Instead I just pivot the bowsprit up and around the hinge formed by that brass rod. But in order to do that, I need to be able to loosen the bobstay which holds down the nose of the bowsprit. For that I used a couple of pulley blocks in the bobstay, tying the free end of the line to a cleat on the samson posts.

However, there is a lot of tension on that bobstay line, and I suspect there will be even greater load on it now that I plan to add a couple of flying jibs. Previously the bobstay only had to counteract the upward pull of one jib stay. Now there will be three jib stays!

I'm worried about the little wires pulling out of the wooden blocks. It has happened a couple of times already. Once when I stupidly bumped the nose of the bowsprit while carrying the boat through a doorway, and the second time when I made an ill-timed grab for the boat while trying to land in big waves on Lake Ontario.

All of the other blocks continue to work just fine with the wire loops glued into them. Here's a bunch of photos illustrating how I beefed up those two blocks in the bobstay.

The first photo shows the original block @ becket, with the red arrow pointing to the wire loop that has already pulled out twice. The following photos show the sequence of how I made up a couple of new blocks which are instead wrapped in rope.

The wooden blocks are formed as usual, but with a shallow groove cut around the outside, in which the rope is seated. The black seizing thread at first is only tied semi-tight, so that it can still slide up or down the rope to adjust the fit. When the rope is snugged around the block, and once the loops are adjusted to the desired size, the thread is pulled tight and permanently secured with a drop of CA glue.

The 2nd last photo shows the original (top) wired blocks vs. new (bottom) rope-wound block system for the bobstay. I had to cut the loop off the bobstay fitting on the old one to get it off. And the last photo shows the new rope-wound blocks and bobstay as installed. That's now good and strong!

By the way, tying the knots in the black seizing threads is done like this: (see starting at 7:42 in this video.)

Creating a fixed eye in your Amsteel Blue Winch Line (12 min 6 sec)
Feb 22, 2019, 11:57 AM
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Zbip57's Avatar
One more worrisome hurdle cleared!

My cheap transmitter does not have a rotary dial such as the one Shaggy is using to control his flying jib.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaggy_From_NZ
... for the Flying jib i added a second winch on a third channel on my radio, The transmitter i have ( Futaba T6K) has a dial on the front which i am using to control this....
My transmitter has several extra switches, but I'd rather use one of the proportional channels for trimming the jibs.

I'm already using the ratcheted throttle channel to control the three sails on booms, and the aileron channel for the rudder. I was wondering if I could use either the remaining rudder or elevator channel for trimming the flying jibs?

The problem is that the control sticks for those channels are both spring-centred whereas I'd prefer the stick to remain fixed in any selected position, just like the throttle stick does.

Well, tada! Despite all my fretting about how that might be accomplished, it turns out it wasn't difficult at all. I opened up the transmitter and removed the tiny spring mechanism that draws the stick back to centre. There is no ratchet system on that stick movement, but there's enough friction that it now holds in any selected position.
Feb 22, 2019, 12:34 PM
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Gary Webb's Avatar
Thanks Zbip for that easy solution. Just curious, what make / model transmitter are you using?
Feb 22, 2019, 01:29 PM
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Gary Webb's Avatar

Rope stropped blocks


Hey Zbip,
Gotta say, I like your rope stropped blocks. Not only are they strong, they are true to tradition. I think most Irene builders appreciate that sort of thing.
Side note - I have a copy of "The Rudder" magazine from August 1946 which has an article by Hervey Garrett Smith about making your own Stropped Blocks. In this article he extols the virtues of this tradition, and 1946 was a time when many sailors built their own boats and hardware. Stuff to help fuel the fantasy we can enjoy while building and sailing our models.
Cheers, Gary
Feb 22, 2019, 03:40 PM
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Zbip57's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary Webb
Thanks Zbip for that easy solution. Just curious, what make / model transmitter are you using?
It's a Spektrum DXe. I regret going with the cheapest one offered by my local hobby shop.

For not that much more, I should have purchased the next step up, which comes with the LCD screen and all sorts of programmable options. But this cheaper version, without the screen, is supposed to be programmable via their handy app which you install on your phone. Except you first need to separately order the special cable to connect your phone to the transmitter. And, with the added cost of that cable, I could have bought the better transmitter anyway. Not to mention, the app sucks and provides very few useful features.

Nonetheless, I really only needed a 2-channel radio for rudder and sheet winch control. This one came with a 6-channel receiver, so there was room for "extra stuff". But I can't figure out how to get more of the extra switches to actually do anything.

As expected, the two joysticks drive 4-channels of the receiver-- throttle, rudder, aileron, elevator. But, of the various switches, only the 3-position switch marked "Flight Mode" activates one of the two remaining receiver channels. I'm hoping to use that one for tacking the topsails as it does drive a winch servo to -- full-left, centred, or full-right.

The "Kill Switch" is the only other switch that does anything. When it's flipped, it automatically drives the throttle servo to zero (boom sheets wound in tight). That one has given me a fright on occasion, as I sometimes inadvertently bump it when setting the transmitter on the ground. After that the throttle stick (boom sheets) is mysteriously locked out. The ship's rudder control still works, but no sheet control. Huh? Oh ya, just have to flip that stupid switch back to the other position.

It's also frustrating because I did figure out how to use the phone app to configure my desired "Failsafe" setting, which I chose to be completely the opposite, letting the sheets spool fully out. That actually works. If I switch the transmitter off, or otherwise lose signal, at least the boat won't be sailing close hauled at full speed to disappear over the horizon...
Feb 22, 2019, 03:59 PM
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Zbip57's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary Webb
Hey Zbip,
Gotta say, I like your rope stropped blocks. Not only are they strong, they are true to tradition. I think most Irene builders appreciate that sort of thing.
The wired blocks work great too, and none of the others have ever failed. It's only that one on the bowsprit that's had the wire pull out.

It's actually surprisingly easy to make the rope stropped version. With the wired ones, I missed a few times with the tiny drill in pin-vise, crookedly punching through the side or into the inner hole where the line would run over the sheave.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary Webb
Side note - I have a copy of "The Rudder" magazine from August 1946 which has an article by Hervey Garrett Smith about making your own Stropped Blocks. In this article he extols the virtues of this tradition, and 1946 was a time when many sailors built their own boats and hardware. Stuff to help fuel the fantasy we can enjoy while building and sailing our models.
Cheers, Gary
One thing I wondered about, the block with the single line coming from it is straightforward enough as the end of the rope is hidden under the seizing, but the one in your book's illustration with the double-end, how do you make a single short continuous loop of rope like that?

The fantasy is a very large part of the enjoyment we get out of this. My wife doesn't get that at all. She admires the beauty of the finished product and appreciates the effort that went into it, but she thinks I'm weird when I just sit there and endlessly stare at it, deep in fantasy.
Feb 22, 2019, 06:58 PM
sailtails - YouTube
Gary Webb's Avatar
Zbip asks "how do you make a single short continuous loop of rope like that?"

There is a way, at least with 3 strand rope. The finished loop is called a "grommet", and it is done like this:
First, unlay a piece of 3 strand rope (long enough to go 3 times around the desired loop) and use just one of the strands, winding it around itself, 3 times around the loop to form the grommet. The 2 ends can each be tucked under a strand to secure them. Presto - a continuous loop of rope! Grommet!
I do prefer working with the 3 strand tarred nylon twine rather than braided stuff because of the ease of working with it. You can make eye splices and grommets and a finished piece of rigging can be "adjusted" longer or shorter simply by twisting it. The eye splices are surprisingly easy after you've done a few of them. They take only a few minutes each, the job made easier with use of a toothpick and good light. I always add a drop of CA to make sure this small stuff stays put.
If you have never done an eye splice of this sort, I suggest first practicing with a piece of larger stuff, like 1/4" sisal or manila. There are videos on Youtube for how to do a 3 strand eye splice.
Feb 22, 2019, 09:51 PM
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Zbip57's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary Webb
There is a way, at least with 3 strand rope. [...] use just one of the strands, winding it around itself, 3 times around the loop to form the grommet.
Ah, that's clever. I can see how that would work.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary Webb
I do prefer working with the 3 strand tarred nylon twine rather than braided stuff [...] There are videos on Youtube for how to do a 3 strand eye splice.
At first I had pictured doing eye splices everywhere, instead of seizing the ends of the rope together. But I've been using only the braided stuff and it's more awkward.

That video I linked above shows how eye splices can be done in braided lines, but it ain't so easy in the tiny mason's line or even tinier braided dyneema fishing line. I quickly abandoned any attempt at splicing that.
Feb 22, 2019, 10:01 PM
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Very nice work Zip. Thanks for sharing to the group.
Feb 22, 2019, 10:08 PM
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I’m finally seeing a little progress on my build. I’ve got the removable sail winches installed. They are a continuous loop with blocks on each end of the arrow shafts. The deck will be glued on next. I’m going to do a straight planked deck in Pearwood. This is quite fun.
Feb 23, 2019, 03:14 PM
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Zbip57's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarlMalone
Iím finally seeing a little progress on my build. Iíve got the removable sail winches installed. They are a continuous loop with blocks on each end of the arrow shafts.
Two winches. So you're planning something interesting as well...

Quote:
Originally Posted by CarlMalone
The deck will be glued on next. Iím going to do a straight planked deck in Pearwood.
If the deck turns out as nicely as the one on your Canterbury, then this'll surely be a beauty!
https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...9#post41137271
Feb 23, 2019, 03:17 PM
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Zbip57's Avatar
I just finished sacrificing another Bic Pen, converting it into 40 individually sliced, filed, and sanded jib hanks.
Feb 27, 2019, 05:53 AM
Registered User

Rakes on masts for gaff-rigged Irene


Hi Folks,
Am building the gaff-rigged Irene at 80% linear size, and just realized that the position of the mast feet and the deck holes are not exactly correct. I am thinking of moving the deck holes a bit to correct the rakes of the masts. I think the feet are correct, according to the gaff version.
From Gary's optional sailplan drawing I took some rough measurements and with a bit of trigonometry refreshing have calculated the tangents of the angle from vertical to be 0.136 and 0.118. The arctangents give 6.7deg main foremast and 7.7deg for the mizzen aftmast. This agrees roughly from a website on schooners which gives 6.5 and 7.5. Does anyone know which angles look best? I doubt that the performance is much influenced.
Hope I am finished with Irene when the ice clears from the lake. It is now 30 cm thick but the weather is warm at the moment, about 10C.
Hope you are all well and either building or sailing.
Irving


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