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Aug 01, 2018, 07:35 PM
a.k.a. Bob Parks
bbbp's Avatar
If looking for detail & you fill the frame water to mast top with a vertical frame, the image is larger than if was in landscape mode. Only reason I can think of.
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Aug 01, 2018, 07:47 PM
Flying Models Plans
The only real reason is force of habit.

As for max detail, landscape wins again with this subject. Irene is longer than she is tall, and even more so with a gaff-rigged main.
Aug 02, 2018, 05:57 AM
Registered User

Almost there!!


Hi there. I think I'm about 85% complete. There's the winch system to finish, the remaining rigging and the keel to paint and I think she is then ready to sail. I live in Finistere(French for 'the end of the earth) in Brittany and the idea was to use ideas from local sailing boats. The area was famous for tuna and sardine fishing and the boats tended to have her colour scheme - white with 'Breton Blue' topsides. The sails were dyed using boiled bark from a Eucalyptus tree.
Fair winds to all.
Aug 02, 2018, 06:58 PM
Registered User
Zbip57's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by MGMike
boats tended to have her colour scheme - white with 'Breton Blue' topsides. The sails were dyed using boiled bark from a Eucalyptus tree.
Elle est belle!

I see you put the steering wheel at the back. It's nice to see so many different personalized modifications.

Many people, upon first seeing my boat, have asked me why the wheel is pointing backwards. At first I thought it looked weird too, but Gary's plans have it that way. And a little online searching shows it's actually quite common to have it positioned like that.

Here's a photo of the wheel house for Canada's Bluenose II schooner.

One thing you'll need to be careful about though. When the sail sheets are spooled all the way out slack, there's a possibility the loose line may tangle in your wheel. The drum winch motor has quite a lot of torque. When the sheets are wound back in tight, the line may tear off your wheel. Just something to think about...
Aug 06, 2018, 04:42 AM
Registered User
Hi. I had a word with the crew and the helmsman wasn't happy with having his arms amputated and stuck on backwards

Quite a few of the bits and pieces are simply 'dressing' and will be removed when sailing. When fitting up the winch system I made the mistake of winding the cord the wrong way around the servo drum. The torque was enough to break one of the bearers before I could reverse the travel. They are powerful little servo's. I want as little as possible to catch the sheets when she is out on the lake and so the wheel is removable along with the crew, lobster net, etc. The two for'd (?) hatches will also be replaced by the standard flat versions. Here in Brittany they have a long involvement with the sea and there are many static shows during the winter so she may well be shown 'fully dressed' so to speak.
Aug 08, 2018, 09:45 PM
sailtails - YouTube
Gary Webb's Avatar

New Boats Afloat


Hi Gang,
I've been out of touch for awhile, but am back up and running now. Congratulations to - Daniel in Belgium - Zbip57 in Canada - HowBau in USA - who have recently launched their schooners. Great too to see boats taking shape - Shaggy in NZ and MGMike in France.
I just managed to post a video of a nice day of sailing last April. "Tramp" (my gaff Irene) and "Emma" can be seen amongst other boats at a gathering in California.
Cheers, Gary
RC Schooners & Newport 12’s at Mason Park (5 min 8 sec)
Aug 08, 2018, 10:33 PM
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Zbip57's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary Webb
I just managed to post a video of a nice day of sailing last April.
Great video Gary!

I'm curious about your camera control.

Are you using a video transmitter and monitor to remotely see what your camera is pointed at? Or are you just eyeballing this from shore to aim the camera approximately where you'd like it pointed?

When the pond is that crowded you pretty much have to focus on paying attention to where your boat is going, rather than be watching a video monitor. Or do you use two people for this? One to concentrate on steering the boat, while the other works at aiming the camera. But presumably Spike was already occupied sailing the other boat.

How do you do that?
Aug 08, 2018, 11:20 PM
Po' boys does w/ Po'boys ways
haxawsnavy's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary Webb
Hi Gang,
I've been out of touch for awhile, but am back up and running now. Congratulations to - Daniel in Belgium - Zbip57 in Canada - HowBau in USA - who have recently launched their schooners. Great too to see boats taking shape - Shaggy in NZ and MGMike in France.
I just managed to post a video of a nice day of sailing last April. "Tramp" (my gaff Irene) and "Emma" can be seen amongst other boats at a gathering in California.
Cheers, Gary
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tVPX9cTEBVw
+1 Here in N.C.USA,!! GREAT BUILDS Skippers,!!! Howard my mate, HATE I missed your boats Maiden,!! Think I will probly NOT get as advanced of a builder as ya'll to do an Irene even if that IS my mothers name n would have a namesake hook at least,!!! Don't think my skill level is up to it as ya'lls ,.... YET,...! Tim aka Cap'n Hax
Aug 09, 2018, 03:20 AM
Mad on modding
robcrusoe's Avatar
Zip.. I'm sure Gary does it like I do, try out a few deck locations , assess, then next time just sail the boat. Editing comes next as you wade through an hour's videoing.
I often position my boat in front of the oncoming race and just let the skippers come as close as they want as they slip past.
Hanging about on the outside of a marker also captures some interesting sailing.
Position a deck mounted camera on an angle will get a good return and allow you to stay clear of the traffic. I like hanging in behind a boat as well. Overtaking a slower boat also gives a first person feeling to it.
Aug 09, 2018, 07:28 AM
Registered User
Zbip57's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by robcrusoe
I'm sure Gary does it like I do, try out a few deck locations,...
I'm doing it the way you do, trying out various fixed deck positions.

But Gary is doing something altogether different. His camera on Tramp is mounted where the ship's wheel would otherwise be. But the camera is mounted on a couple of servos and can be remotely panned left/right and tilted up/down.

See at 2:04 in his video. The camera tilts up/down and pans left/right.
https://youtu.be/tVPX9cTEBVw?t=124

I'm really curious to know how Gary can tell what the camera is currently seeing. He's not just steering the camera randomly . He must have a remote monitor because the shots are always perfectly framed and panned to follow passing boats.

Is he controlling the camera motion simultaneously while steering the boat? That hurts my brain.

When flying my drone I frame my shots using a remote monitor. But I can comfortably steer the drone at the same time because I know I'm manoeuvring it around an otherwise empty sky. I can't see how Gary would be accurately controlling camera motion at the same time as steering his boat through all that other boat traffic, unless he's using two people to do it.
Aug 09, 2018, 08:49 AM
Registered User
Gary (more correctly his son Spike) hopefully will respond regarding all your questions concerning how he does video ... you could send Gary a PM - Private Msg ??

But ... in meantime ... since I was there when he was shooting the video posted above ... the following is short answer until Gary / Spike can answer your questions how they do the video.

Hopefully the following answers a FEW questions ... as to specific video equipment and model numbers etc ... that would be up to Gary / Spike ... more Spike than Gary. NOTE: Spike does a lot of flight RC stuff both planes and drones ... included long distance flight and real-time video.

The video camera is mounted on a pan-tilt unit (fixed location toward rear - see video mark at 0:40 and 1:50 and 4:10 at a distance while sailing - no close-up of pan-tilt) that Spike either made or modified (not sure which). The video camera image has REAL-TIME link to small flat screen sitting next to them on shore while sailing. The camera is controlled real-time as to framing and slewing (pan-tilt) to catch the new views. Usually move camera and leave it in one position to allow focus on sailing - only changing camera occasionally ... when less adjacent traffic more attention can be on making video camera changes (for reasons noted by other folks above) ... usually setting up camera angle then shoot some video ... this requires lots of video and POST-SAILING EDITING ... vs ... real-time camera changes and chasing / looking for a camera shot.

Seems to me ... Spike has been doing a lot of flight video/flying such that sailboats and camera work seems second nature to him ... most folks likely have enough challenges just sailing within a crowded fleet - not that others can’t do what Spike “makes look easy” from the video posted ... like anything - takes practice.

Spike is doing all the video equipment as well as video editing post sailing ... Spike is also the single person DOING BOTH SAILING AND VIDEO CONTROL using SAME RADIO (not sure what 2.4 radio ... I didn’t ask or look ... didn’t want to be too nosy). Left stick controls pan-title (left-right = left-right and up-down = up-down) ... right stick controls sailboat (left-right = rudder left-right ... up-down = sail sheeting in/out)
Last edited by slo.ca6; Aug 09, 2018 at 10:11 AM.
Aug 09, 2018, 01:26 PM
Registered User
Zbip57's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by slo.ca6
Spike is also the single person DOING BOTH SAILING AND VIDEO CONTROL using SAME RADIO
That's really impressive!

I remember they posted some shots earlier in this thread showing the camera gimbal and video transmitter setup. I can't find the exact post at the moment, but I did save the photos.

I was just wondering how he manages to keep both the boat and camera under control simultaneously. You'd need to change focus constantly between watching line-of-sight where the boat is going, then shift to watching the video monitor to keep the camera centred on the view you want.

It would be easy enough if yours is the only boat out there. Just set its course in the direction you want, then let it sail on by itself while you have fun watching and changing the camera view on your monitor. But to do all that while mixing it up in such busy and close traffic, as seen in their latest video, that's not easy at all!

It would be cool to use head-tracking goggles, that automatically make the camera follow your head movements. i.e. Turn your head left/right, the camera automatically pans left/right. But while wearing goggles, you're blind to everything else in your environment. Controlling the camera with manual stick movements, while watching the monitor, swinging the camera from dead ahead to left so it's looking over the port side, you gotta remember that the boat itself is no longer heading in the same direction the camera is looking. It'd be really easy to get disoriented.
Aug 09, 2018, 02:17 PM
sailtails - YouTube
Gary Webb's Avatar

Tramp's FPV system


Hi Gang,
Gotta say you guys have it pretty well figured out, but will throw in the straight skinny about the set up used to film that last video.
A Mobius camera is mounted upon a standard servo (for tilt) which is mounted (I made an aluminum bracket) on top of a 360 degree servo (for pan).
This 360 degree servo is set into the aft deck hatch over the schooner's steering. The camera (powered by the FPV battery) can record for hours and is set up to break the video into 10 minute segments.
The camera's view is sent to the skipper by a video transmitter mounted along with a lipo battery (powers the transmitter and camera) on the underside of the schooner's cargo hatch.
The skipper is watching a screen (ReadyMadeRC FPV monitor) mounted along with the video receiver and another lipo battery in a plastic tool box which also serves as a carrying case for transmitter(s). This video system ( Aomway 5.8G) is a hand-me-down from son Spike's airplane work. The old man installed the set up in the boat with tech guidance from the kid.
The kid is indeed the one who sails the boat AND controls the camera. Not easy to do, as some of you have imagined. We use a HiTec Optic-5 radio which is a typical 2.4 airplane radio. The left stick steers the boat and trims the sails while the right stick controls the pan/tilt of the camera.
Obviously the camera is a distraction for the skipper who should be watching where he is going (and traffic and sail trim) so it is not surprising that mishaps have occurred. Our sincere apologies to those we have tangled with. Happily no significant damage so far.
Sailing of course has its' limitations. Course and speed are generally related to the wind and this is challenging to the skipper/cameraman. Now the video clips can be really really good when things fall into place, but Spike thinks he could do a better job filming - if he had - (the old man shudders) a POWERED camera boat. So, at the moment, I'm (shudder) working on it -
Cheers, Gary
Aug 09, 2018, 03:27 PM
Registered User
Zbip57's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary Webb
The kid is indeed the one who sails the boat AND controls the camera. Not easy to do, as some of you have imagined.
Be sure to tell Spike that I'm deeply impressed at his skills.

It would be much simpler with dual controls and two operators. But having only one person control both is certainly tricky.

It's precisely the difficulty of having to frequently refocus your attention between direct line-of-sight of the vessel and/or video monitor camera view that led to the near disaster of my drone colliding with my friend's schooner.

It was pure fluke that neither went to the bottom of the lake.

dji Phantom vs. R/C Schooner (4 min 39 sec)
Aug 09, 2018, 04:58 PM
Mad on modding
robcrusoe's Avatar
Well there you go, I missed that tilting and just treated the general panning as careful sailing of the boat, which it still was.
Reading what you have all been saying since I suspected that he wasn't using a GoPro, and that Spike might be, and should be, doing most of it.
Nearly all my onboard video is with mobius, not only because of the cost, but also the compact size and weight.
Without sounding like I'm peeing in my own pocket, with years of fast and as close as it gets rc sailboat racing, I am confident of being able to close sail the boat without menace, stay on the course and avoiding actual contact with other boats, and keeping in mind where the camera is pointing. I tend to use a rigid (but adjustable) mount as I use the same gear on my larger plastic comp boats as well.
On the schooner Molly G I have a rotating mount that is simplicity plus. It is just a smaller drum winch servo fitted into the aft hatch with the mobius fixed with velcro to the top of the 2" drum. It is controlled by an oversized knob on channel 5 on my Turnigy 9Xs Tx. The motion is slowed right down and has a suitable delay to make the transition as smooth as possible, given the austere nature of the gear.,
I also have a repurposed ex-Laser hull that is fitted with a brushed outboard motor and on that I have the same winch servo as the schooners and it is even smoother in operation. That boat doubles as a recovery vessel as it has lots of power, low drag wide hull and thrust vectoring, to help dominate the match between a derelict, 2KG boat and itself. You could devote a whole thread to boats of that intent, but I just mention it because of its multi capability of a stable, highly manoeuvrable and low impact support boat. It has a unique if unorthodox method of keeping one metre boats securely held, even in lively conditions.
Here's a video of what I'm talking about. I only mention it because it is my most dependable camera platform.
But the bottom line is, even with a fixed small camera ($100 max.) you can get enough from 50 minutes of recording while honing up your comfort zone in getting closer in and personal. As with any video production, a lot of its success is on the cutting floor.

Here are a few examples of how I make do with this budget gear and what the viewer gets to see.
This video has two cameras, one is like a mobius (cheap) and you will see how it functions, and what it saw. It also shows the mounted gear. Ok, not always the smoothest, but keep in mind I'm doing it from a good distance away without FPV.
Molly Cam 3 (6 min 53 sec)


A slo-mo of Anna with 2 set angle cameras. The height above deck and clearance around rigging etc needs consideration when setting up.
Anna SloMo (1 min 13 sec)


And the Laser recovery/camera boat.
An example of how effective it can be under low power
Neangar Mystery Facility (1 min 55 sec)


And a test session on my favourite more scenic venue.

LRV 951 (4 min 4 sec)


If a photo is worth a heap of words, what value then for a short video?


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