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Jul 11, 2018, 06:41 AM
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Maidentrip of a new Irene


Last Saturday was d-day for the "Wandrin' Star", a new "Irene".
Unfortunately the wind was very sleepy that day. The ship had been sitting idle in my workshop for about six months for lack of a suitable sailing location until I found a RC hobby club with a fantastic pond near by.
A new trial run this coming Saturday will hopefully bring some more wind.
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Jul 11, 2018, 09:20 PM
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Zbip57's Avatar
Success! We poured the lead.

I made a wooden mould using the handy method illustrated in these previous posts,
Post #123, Post #124, Post #126, Post #127

At first I used two boards in the centre, and two cut at 45-degrees, and two flat boards at either side, then a flat lid plate screwed on top. But measuring the volume by filling the mould with sugar, and doing some math to figure the weight of the lead, soon revealed that this would be way way too heavy!

So I removed one of the centre boards, and repeated the volume measurements. Now the calculations predicted each half of the lead bulb would come out of the mould weighing ~7 pounds, total 14 lbs. And that's exactly how it turned out. That was perfect because there was some trimming and shaping required, with the finished keel bulb ultimately coming in at the desired 12 lbs.

My friend with the wrought iron shop dumped the lead in a pot and melted it using an oxy-acetylene torch. That melted the lead like butter. We then poured the molten lead through the sprue hole into the wooden mould. Smoke steamed out of the vent hole until the mould was full.

The problem though with a mould sealed up like this is that you can't see when the lead has solidified enough to allow opening up the mould. We eventually unscrewed the lid and tipped the lead ingot out, which promptly broke in half. (See red arrow in first photo.)

Why not just leave the mould open lying flat without the lid attached, and pour the lead in like this? But of course now we wouldn't be able to fill the mould to the brim anymore without the lead running out of the trough formed by the sprue hole. So we screwed the flat lid to the end of the mould to block the sprue trough. That worked beauty fine!

For trimming and shaping the lead ingots I used a rasp, like a cheese grater, as shown in the last two photos. That worked surprisingly well.

I filled some imperfections with epoxy filler, just waiting for that to cure overnight. Then some final sanding and painting and the keel should be all done. Just in time for us to have to go away this weekend, so the maiden launch will have to wait until next week. But very soon!
Jul 12, 2018, 09:58 AM
Registered User
For future reference ... instead of rasp / cheese grater tool shown ...

Shaping lead (as well as soft metals like aluminum) can be done using a special file called a “Vixen” ...

ask your friend that helped you melt and pour lead ... he might have one or could get one for you
Jul 13, 2018, 07:13 PM
Registered User
Hi Shaggy Pete Rabbit here from Whakatane in the good old Bay of Plenty and am also building the Irene schooner.Well into the build fitting control gear,painting etc, and looks great.Will need to post some pics when i figure how to on this site.Good luck with your build.
Jul 14, 2018, 08:05 AM
Recent Convert
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peterrabbit
Hi Shaggy Pete Rabbit here from Whakatane in the good old Bay of Plenty and am also building the Irene schooner.
Hi Pete, Glad there is another Kiwi on this forum, Will be nice to see your build, Mine is coming along slowly and ill post some more Pictures soon , Just about finished the interior of the hull and getting ready to epoxy seal and paint it, then I'll start on the deck and cabin fitout Posting Pictures isnt hard , just click on the Paperclip next to the Smiley face and follow the instructions.

have fun

Shaggy
Jul 14, 2018, 04:34 PM
Mad on modding
robcrusoe's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielvaneygen
Last Saturday was d-day for the "Wandrin' Star", a new "Irene".
.



Daniel, your boat looks very sharp and precise. Mother Nature seems to make us learn patience at times like this.

Always better breezes coning up!
Last edited by robcrusoe; Jul 16, 2018 at 03:19 AM.
Jul 18, 2018, 07:42 PM
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Zbip57's Avatar

Maiden Voyage of Kamanik!


She floats!

We had a successful launch, aided by my mom and her dog.

It was tricky conditions because of the variable gusty winds, sometimes coming across the lake and sometimes blowing from completely the opposite direction.

The boat is incredibly stable. In strong gusts that would lay my Monsoon over on her side, this schooner barely heels over at all. Bilges completely dry. I'm itching to try her out in stronger winds.

I've since adjusted the sail trims to take out the creases in the foresail, topping lifts were too tight, and shortened the sheet on the foresail a bit. It's so cool that everything is adjustable.

Hope this video works for you, before Youtube blocks it for copyright infringement. "Cactus Tree" by Joni Mitchell.

Schooner Kamanik 1st Sail (4 min 42 sec)
Jul 18, 2018, 09:15 PM
Mad on modding
robcrusoe's Avatar

Very, very nice indeed.


Great boat, top quality video, we don't see many videos , which is a pity.

You'll know when she has reached her max. in wind strength, she just wont tack, at all, except in brief drops of wind speed. It that happens (around 27 knots according to my experiences) try jibing. You may have to pump the rudder to get it to come about.

Be sure to keep the action videos coming, please.

P.S. What happened to the dog?
Jul 18, 2018, 09:19 PM
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Zbip57's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by robcrusoe
P.S. What happened to the dog?
Benny (the dog) thought about jumping in to chase the boat, but then decided he'd rather stay on the dock.
Jul 19, 2018, 02:55 PM
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WE Have Sails (Rod Carr Sails)


Yea! we have finished rigging the sails on "Irene" Steal-Her Now just have to do the internals to the masts and winch, then it will be sailing time !!!!!
Jul 19, 2018, 05:34 PM
Registered User
Thread OP

Huzzah Kamanik!


So happy for you, Zbip! That's a beautiful schooner and a beautiful video! What a lovely sailing site!
Congratulations a lot!!
Jul 21, 2018, 07:57 PM
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Zbip57's Avatar
We had both the Kamanik and Monsoon out together today.
Jul 22, 2018, 12:09 AM
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robcrusoe's Avatar
Good one Zip, you need that elusive wind to wind 'em up a bit further, hey?

The Monsoon will have to head to shore a good bit before the Irene.

But in a moderate breeze, properly trimmed and in the hands of a seasoned skipper, the Monny will take the lead.

But it will not come about anywhere near as smartly as the schooner. All to do with stored inertia, methinks. (And a great schooner design, of course!
)

The Monsoon was my first rc sailboat, and my third. (But that's another story.. )
Jul 22, 2018, 01:45 PM
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Zbip57's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by robcrusoe
You'll know when she has reached her max. in wind strength, she just wont tack, at all, except in brief drops of wind speed. It that happens (around 27 knots according to my experiences) try jibing. You may have to pump the rudder to get it to come about.
I'd be worried about jibing in such strong winds if the sheets are left fully slack, as that puts a huge shock load into those delicate wooden blocks when the sails suddenly swing over from one side to the other. To minimize that danger, although we haven't had any good strong winds yet, I've been pulling the sheets in all the way tight even when jibing, then let them out again as the booms swing across.

We haven't had a nice consistent wind for several days yet. Just a gusty variable breeze, which seems to come unpredictably from all different directions. But I have noticed that, if running close-hauled with the sheets pulled in tight whenever a strong gust does suddenly hit, the schooner tends to turn into the wind. It would probably come about and tack all by itself if I didn't apply opposite rudder.

I suspect it has much to do with the way the three sails are trimmed, and the relative lengths of each sheet. Will have to do lots of experimenting yet, but it'll need a steady wind in order to make effective comparisons.

Quote:
Originally Posted by robcrusoe
you need that elusive wind to wind 'em up a bit further, hey?
Absolutely, it's definitely more fun in a strong wind, but it glides along just fine in even the merest breeze. It's frustrating though when the wind dies altogether.

Quote:
Originally Posted by robcrusoe
The Monsoon will have to head to shore a good bit before the Irene.
But in a moderate breeze, properly trimmed and in the hands of a seasoned skipper, the Monny will take the lead.
But it will not come about anywhere near as smartly as the schooner. All to do with stored inertia, methinks. (And a great schooner design, of course!
It was very interesting (to me anyway) studying the two onboard videos to compare skippering styles between me and my daughter's boyfriend as we took turns sailing the Monsoon and Schooner. He likes to keep the sheets wound in tight most of the time. Whenever a strong gust hit the Monsoon, it just laid over flat and spilled all the wind out of its sails. It actually responds much better with the sheets let out a bit further. The much heavier schooner barely rolls over at all, and so can make far better use of its large sail area in strong winds. In light breezes, the lighter plastic Monsoon should have the advantage, but again most of the time he had the sheets pulled in too tight and so the schooner still ended up quicker.

I think the trick, regardless which way the boat is pointing relative to the wind, is to let the sheets out just to the point where the sails start fluttering, then bring them back in tighter until the sails fill properly. Pulling the sheets in any tighter than that just ends up being counter-productive.
Jul 22, 2018, 01:54 PM
Registered User
Zbip57's Avatar

Camera mounts


In case anyone was curious, this is how I mounted the cameras on my schooner and on the Monsoon.

That first video I posted was shot using a tiny SQ12 camera. I've since moved that one to the Monsoon and am using a better GoPro Hero3 on the schooner instead. With the Irene-class schooner you could probably hang a brick over the side and wouldn't even notice the extra weight. It's a remarkably stable vessel.

I fashioned a little wooden camera mount that clamps to the gunwale railing, so I can position the camera anywhere along the railing. Using a few different GoPro accessories enables the camera to be swung to any angle, further out or closer in. It just requires a little caution to not put it where it could snag the sail sheets.

The smaller SQ12 is stuck to the deck of the Monsoon using a GoPro adhesive mount and a couple of swivels.


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