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Jun 19, 2018, 01:58 PM
John Page

Irene/ Emma -- Wood turning tips


Thank you, Ken.

If you are turning pen blanks at 4,000 rpm, my 800 rpm was likely far too slow. The diameter of my keel bulb blank was 2 inches.
I'll also try a sanding disc instead of a edged cutting tool; then fill the grain with paint or sanding sealer. Great idea!

Cheers. John in Oregon
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Jun 19, 2018, 08:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jradarp
Thank you, Ken.

If you are turning pen blanks at 4,000 rpm, my 800 rpm was likely far too slow. The diameter of my keel bulb blank was 2 inches.
I'll also try a sanding disc instead of a edged cutting tool; then fill the grain with paint or sanding sealer. Great idea!

Cheers. John in Oregon
Remember that the RPM only helps control the cutting speed. Lets use IPM (inches per minute). A 1/2in diameter part has a circumference of 1.57in. Multiply that by 4000(RPM) gives a cutting speed of 6,280IPM.

Your 2in diameter pattern has a circumference of 6.28in. Multiply that by 800(RPM) gives a cutting speed of 5,024IPM. Bumping your cutting speed to 1000RPM on your 2in diameter part will give you a cutting speed of 6,280IPM, the exact same IPM cutting speed as the 1/2in diameter part at 4,000PM.

This is why large lathes don't turn fast, they don't have to. Because of the diameter of the parts they are used for they can turn slow to achieve an acceptable cutting speed.

Given all that, a piece of sandpaper glued to a flat stick (like a nail file) will make short work of turning down a couple coats of paint on your pattern if it's turning in the lathe. And with sandpaper the cutting speed isn't important. Just go slow, it won't take but a extra minute or two and you will have more control.
Last edited by Ken Barnes; Jun 21, 2018 at 07:17 PM.
Jun 20, 2018, 05:08 PM
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Thread OP

Trimming the gaff?


Here's a basic question about adjusting the foresail. I've got it rigged as shown on the plans. On the pond the gaff will swing well out off the center of the boat even with the sheet holding the boom in quite close.
Deborah will be sailing toward the wind with all sails sheeted in close and with that gaff swung way out.
Is this OK? Should the gaff stay more in line with the boom?
Jun 20, 2018, 05:30 PM
Mad on modding
robcrusoe's Avatar
Stick with the plan, it will do as it is intended and just as you would expect.

I'm no expert but I have sailed the Molly B on a good number of days, and up to brisk conditions and both gaffs (mine is gaff rigged, so two of them) only need adjusting to keep creases out UNDER actual modest or greater, sailing. In light airs you may get one or two but as the sails are not able to fill completely it should be of no immediate concern.
My understanding is the gaff intentionally does what you say to induce that beautiful, ever so graceful curving and is free to do so.
The sprit on Emma does something the same, but as Gary says, is very simplistic.

On this maiden sailing day you can see what I describe as well as my need to adjust the gaff to remove that crease in the main.

Gary will most likely give us a more professional explanation. I believe he is over worked right now.
Jun 20, 2018, 09:45 PM
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Thread OP

Retired and far too busy?


Quote:
Originally Posted by robcrusoe
Gary will most likely give us a more professional explanation. I believe he is over worked right now.
Yes, imagine trying to keep those bears out of mischief...
Jun 20, 2018, 10:45 PM
Mad on modding
robcrusoe's Avatar
Yup, doesn't bear thinking about...
Jun 21, 2018, 01:37 AM
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He bearly has time to scratch himself. (sorry )
Jun 22, 2018, 11:24 AM
sailtails - YouTube
Gary Webb's Avatar

Scratching & Trimming


Hi Everybody,
It is true that I have been too busy lately, but I am learning to scratch and work at the same time.
Paul, you might try tightening up the PEAK halyard a bit to minimize this sail "twist". Tightening it too much will induce wrinkles (not good) and some twist is to be expected. In fact, this twist is the main factor contributing to the gaff rig's poor reputation for going to weather. We live with it, and often find that overall sailing performance of a gaffer can actually be quite good. Deborah's marconi main sail might be a plus when it comes to working to weather.
Fun Stuff eh? Cheers, Gary
Jul 03, 2018, 05:30 PM
Recent Convert

The build Has started!


I got started on my Irene Build at last.

Made the Hull from 2mm Birch Plywood and planked the sides in Mahogany strips. One coat of Epoxy sealer Has been added to the outside at this stage just to protect the mahogany while I work on the rest of the build.
I'm not going to plank the bottom as the mahogany was expensive, the part at the stern above the waterline I'll stain to match the sides.

Cheers

Shaggy
Jul 03, 2018, 08:05 PM
Actual Model Aviator.
pitviper51's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shaggy_From_NZ
I got started on my Irene Build at last.

Made the Hull from 2mm Birch Plywood and planked the sides in Mahogany strips. One coat of Epoxy sealer Has been added to the outside at this stage just to protect the mahogany while I work on the rest of the build.
I'm not going to plank the bottom as the mahogany was expensive, the part at the stern above the waterline I'll stain to match the sides.

Cheers

Shaggy
Now I like that. Looks good
Jul 03, 2018, 09:34 PM
Flying Models Plans
Agreed, the planking is a very nice touch.
Jul 06, 2018, 09:16 AM
Registered User

In need of help and expert advise


Hi all. I'm in need of expert advise for the rigging of my "Irene". I've included lots of pic's to help. The pic's of the sails are the "Rod Carr Sails" and are beautiful and were expertly made. I highly recommend them. In speaking with Rod, he recommended attaching them with braided twine to the masts and booms. I concur, and I will follow his recommendations. I will leave a 1/16" clearance and use #12 Tarred Braided Twine. As for the masts you will notice I have attached them at the top with loops and the line runs down to the pin-rails,through them, and attach to the pelican hooks at the proper points. This gives the masts strength and the stays are tight and can be adjusted by turning the pelican hooks if needed. Also easy for disassembly for travel. I'm thinking of using 1/8" eye hooks to attach the blocks to the masts and booms. Also on the bow spirit I used "Bowsies" to allow for adjustment and transport. I want some help with the rigging, ie: do I need the main line between the masts. Any recommendations will be considered, Pic's would be great and drawings will also help. Thanks all.
Jul 08, 2018, 05:32 PM
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Zbip57's Avatar

Question re: ballast lead bulb


I'm almost ready to pour lead into the mould for the keel bulb. I have fashioned a mould, acquired enough lead, and found a friend who runs a wrought iron shop who has offered to help me melt the lead.

It is a single mould to be re-used for each half of two halves of the keel bulb.

Never having this done before, my question is, approximately how long do I need to let it sit for the molten lead to harden before it's safe to open up the mould? Is it possible to cast both halves of the bulb in a single afternoon? Do I need to wait a couple of hours, a full day, a month???
Jul 08, 2018, 05:49 PM
Mad on modding
robcrusoe's Avatar
Zip.. you are wise to get a knowledgeable mate to assist, it is a process that needs direction.

Molten lead solidifies much faster that you might think, but it does it from the edges first as that is where the heat is lost. For half moulds It would be fine in a couple of minutes, assuming you have a half mould you will be able to see the cooling/hardening process yourself. Lead tends to slump sightly in the middle as it cools off, understandable and not an issue. Once firm (test the centre with a piece of thin wire) it is OK to drop into a bucket of water Ready to handle in least the a five minutes. (wear leather gloves, though).
If your first pour doesn't work out to weight or shape, remelt it without cooling as it will do so very quickly as it is already greatly heated. I keep doing mine until I get the weight where I want it. Any gaps or depressions can be filled in with car body bog.
Happy smelting!
Last edited by robcrusoe; Jul 09, 2018 at 03:11 AM.
Jul 10, 2018, 04:44 PM
Mad on modding
robcrusoe's Avatar

Rigging advice


Quote:
Originally Posted by HowBau
I want some help with the rigging, ie: do I need the main line between the masts. Any recommendations will be considered, Pic's would be great and drawings will also help. Thanks all.

HB: I think it would be worthwhile just making a short list of the info you are seeking, as it is, nobody seems willing to respond as it is a very open question and would be best served with individual requests.

I am unsure what you mean by "the mainline between the masts". Are you referring to the shrouds?


Excellent photos. good to see a worthwhile coverage with so many.


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