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Mar 29, 2018, 08:16 PM
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Claybury's Avatar

Jib servo


Can anyone comment on the merits, or lack there of, of adding a separate winch for the Jib?
Thanks.
TJ
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Mar 29, 2018, 10:19 PM
a.k.a. Bob Parks
bbbp's Avatar
Mostly used in racing yachts to fine tune the jib for maximum speed, prolly not needed on this boat.

bp
Mar 29, 2018, 10:52 PM
Po' boys does w/ Po'boys ways
haxawsnavy's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Claybury
When you screwed something up you walked away from the work. Then you got up and went back to work.
TJ
I've done this "technique" and it WORKS GREAT,!!! Forget about it 20 mins n look out your window n "worry' bout NOTHIN for a few n SEE WUT YOU GIT,!! Beautiful peace that lets you go back at'er with a new resolution/revelation or at least a fresh more positive / less frustrated vibes going on,!!(NEGATIVE VIBES) will get you every time,! (I think they are partners in crime w/ Murphy),!!! Remember THIS is SUPOSED to be FUN,!!! n it looks like you're having your share. I do however wanna ask ,.. WHY did you stain the deck before the planking applied,???? Won't that make it harder for the strips to adhere,???? Tim aka Cap'n Hax
Mar 30, 2018, 10:19 AM
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Claybury's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbbp
Mostly used in racing yachts to fine tune the jib for maximum speed, prolly not needed on this boat.

bp
I'm not concerned with speed. Wondering about pointing ability and light air performance, since the jib is the high lift device for the foresail.
Mar 30, 2018, 10:35 AM
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Zbip57's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimbo Sailor
Zbip57...OMG! I think I just found my identical twin brother separated at birth!
Hah!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimbo Sailor
I had the same kinda problem with incompatible paints I used on the hull interior that had to be completely stripped out and re done! Good that we can laugh at ourselves
It's funny, I was just now telling my wife about you and your curdled paint episode.

Working on the inside surfaces of the hull is awkward because there are so many nooks and crannies. And that penetrating epoxy stuff is evil. The fumes are unavoidable because you need to get your head right over it to see what you're doing inside the hull.

I let it sit a couple of extra days just to make absolutely certain that the epoxy is completely cured before I dare touch it again.

Anyway, I was just telling my wife about that and how the next step will be to paint the interior surfaces of the hull, but I really don't want to rush that, because you gotta see these photos from this guy's blog posts out in BC with the curdled paint... OMG!

We can laugh about it now, but man that must have been an awful shock to discover that mess at the time.
Mar 30, 2018, 11:31 AM
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Zbip57's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by g'n's
Sweet! Don't you love having wild neighbors?
Sure do.

There is one doe with three young fawns that come regularly to visit our bird feeder.

Here are three young 'uns getting chased away by the ducks.

Deerly Departed (1 min 7 sec)
Mar 30, 2018, 11:47 AM
Registered User
Zbip57's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by haxawsnavy
I do however wanna ask ,.. WHY did you stain the deck before the planking applied,???? Won't that make it harder for the strips to adhere,????
I'm not planning on doing any actual planking.

I drew all the planking lines onto the various surfaces using just a black ballpoint pen. It looked pretty good like that before staining.

But the stain pretty much obscured most of those lines. The lines going cross-grain are all still visible, but the lines running with the grain are now hard to see.

I'm still considering whether it's worth the effort to try redrawing the lines on top of the first layer of varnish, but meh. I think I'll just leave it as-is.
Mar 30, 2018, 12:27 PM
sailtails - YouTube
Gary Webb's Avatar

Jib "Tuning"


Quote:
Originally Posted by Claybury
I'm not concerned with speed. Wondering about pointing ability and light air performance, since the jib is the high lift device for the foresail.
Interesting topic, an extra servo would complicate things, and I love "Simple".
I'll point out that although the single servo controls all 3 sails together, the sheet adjustments are individual and this provides for a degree of "tuning".
I've always been pretty happy with the schooner's pointing and light air performance. Don't expect her to point quite as well as a racing sloop, but she never fails to come about.
Cheers, Gary
Mar 30, 2018, 12:45 PM
sailtails - YouTube
Gary Webb's Avatar

Deck "planking lines"


Quote:
Originally Posted by Zbip57
I'm not planning on doing any actual planking.

I drew all the planking lines onto the various surfaces using just a black ballpoint pen. It looked pretty good like that before staining.

But the stain pretty much obscured most of those lines. The lines going cross-grain are all still visible, but the lines running with the grain are now hard to see.

I'm still considering whether it's worth the effort to try redrawing the lines on top of the first layer of varnish, but meh. I think I'll just leave it as-is.
Wow Zbip, your boat is looking GOOD! Thanks for sharing your progress with us.
I shall report about my own ink lines on deck. When I built the original "Irene", I used a ball point pen to draw lines on the bare plywood, brushed on clear penetrating epoxy sealer, then varnished over with two coats of high quality UV resistant gloss varnish. I then added two coats of satin polyurethane to hide the gloss for I did not want the glare of a gloss finish to show up when filming. The lines showed well when she was new. Now, 4 years later, the varnish is still in good shape but the ink lines have faded considerably. They still show, but not like when new. I can only surmise that over time the wood has absorbed the ink. ???
Cheers, Gary
Last edited by Gary Webb; Mar 30, 2018 at 11:49 PM. Reason: added fact (epoxy)
Mar 31, 2018, 09:14 PM
Registered User
Zbip57's Avatar
I made some cleats to tie off the ends of the sheets, to allow for adjustment of the relative lengths of each sheet for fine-tuning.

Starting with 1/4" x 3/8" pine strips, cut to ~3/4" lengths, drill two small holes to mark the inside of the elbows. Then cut in towards those holes from the ends and the foot, as seen in the unfinished cleat in the top-left of the first photo. Then file and sand to shape.

The second photo shows them stained, but not yet varnished.

I drilled a hole down through the top of each cleat and will pin them in place with a short length of 1/16" stainless wire, plus a dab of epoxy.

I haven't yet decided how many I'll end up needing, or where exactly I'll mount each cleat. There's still the question of how to stow any remaining loose line beyond the cleat.

All of Gary's photos and videos show his lines so neatly coiled and tidily hung on the pin rails. Gary, do you have a tutorial on how you do that?
Mar 31, 2018, 09:20 PM
Mad on modding
robcrusoe's Avatar
I found that 2B black pencil looked great, until clear coating made it indistinct.

My Sloop Maxine has better contrast markings, I used a no-name permanent marker (tested it on scrap before committing) and although it is both evident and lasting, it is really a bit on the thick side. Also the plank width is a bit excessive. I spent some time trying to figure out how to stagger the plank joins. In the end I just did what seemed reasonable. Is there a certain method commonly used?

The next one I do I'll buy a quality brand name fine liner permanent and I'm sure it will be both pleasing and durable.

Any aerosol clear coats I've tried out have not had a lasting effect. I'm now using brushable U.V. safe clear varnish that is looking still has good a few weeks into sailing. I actually like a high gloss and this stuff is called Ultra gloss, and it is. Haven't videoed with this particular finish using onboard camera but hope to soon.
The BondWell vanish I'm using seems to be a bit on the thick side and on a warm day you see it drying off before your eyes. Next time I'm going to thin it down ands use a second coat a couple of days later. Our weather is cooling off so gone are those days of fast cure epoxy, quick dry enamels.
Mar 31, 2018, 09:34 PM
Mad on modding
robcrusoe's Avatar
[QUOTE=Zbip57;39434990
All of Gary's photos and videos show his lines so neatly coiled and tidily hung on the pin rails. Gary, do you have a tutorial on how you do that?[/QUOTE]

I tried everything, different cordage, different thicknesses and so on. No joy.

But then it occurred to me that my Molly G is always rigged, in storage, in transit and on the beach (and sailing, of course). Therefore the only immediate adjustments s will be minor ones and there is really no point in accommodating all those sail hoisting lines,. So I cut mine to just make, what you are finding a problem too, easy to arrange and fasten. The gaff tackle line only needs small adjustment so it too is minimal. I just make the sail lines long enough to make a reasonable looking hank out of, tie them with fine , near invisible cotton, and fix them to the pinrail with the same cotton.
It IS kosher to do things like this, I suspect I'm not the only one.
Apr 01, 2018, 03:17 PM
Registered User
Zbip57's Avatar
Here's a question for y'all.

The bowsprit is pinned through the samson posts, okay.

A suitable gap needs to be cut through the hull sides in the bow to clear the bowsprit. Right.

Then the tip of the bowsprit is secured in place via the bobstay, forestay, and sidestays (is that what they're called?). That's all fine and good.

My question is, does the bowsprit get glued into place where it passes through the gap in the hull sides? Or does it just sit there loose in a cradle?

The reason I ask is, why is the bowsprit only single pinned through the samson posts (not glued) if that's not supposed to function as a hinge at that point?

See the opening sequence from 0:23 in this video...

My Classic Boat. Heard 28 (9 min 22 sec)
Apr 01, 2018, 05:03 PM
Mad on modding
robcrusoe's Avatar
That's one fine classic boat, for sure.

I'm sure Gary will have the answers for you but on my Irene I find that removing the bow sprit, with boom and jib still attached, allows me to secure that assembly to the mast so that the boat, less keel, fits in my hatchback just fine.
If you make the deck section of the sprit flat sided it sits into the slot of the bow very firmly.
I only use a lower stay to keep the sprit firmly in place,whisker stays are not necessary on the Irene if you use the flat sided sprit. The hinge allows that to function properly as well.
I use a simple bowsie to apply enough tension on the lower stay, and easy to slacken off to remove.

I actually use bowsies on all my boats now, I lack proficiency in knot handling (old fat fingers) and since an appropriately made bowsie allows for quick minor tweaks it seems to me a worthy addition. Once out on the water they are not apparent should someone think them out of place on a classic model sailboat.

You can make custom bowsies by cutting and shaping small servo arms.

I guess we are all different in some ways
Last edited by robcrusoe; Apr 01, 2018 at 05:11 PM.
Apr 01, 2018, 07:52 PM
Registered User
Zbip57's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by robcrusoe
I find that removing the bow sprit, with boom and jib still attached, allows me to [...] I use a simple bowsie to apply enough tension on the lower stay, and easy to slacken off to remove.
So definitely don't glue it down. Otherwise it ain't ever going to be removable.

To remove the bowsprit just slacken the bowsie on the lower stay and then pull out the pin from the samson posts. or merely tilt it back around the hinge pin?

You pretty much have to use a bowsie in order to do that. If the lower stay has an eye-loop for the tip of the bowsprit and is then solidly looped through the anchoring hook, doubled back and seized, how would one ever be able to slack off the tension enough to remove the bowsprit?

I see on Gary's original Irene the pelican hooks on the mast shrouds allow the masts to be easily removed, but on his "set up & sailing" video it looks like he leaves the bowsprit installed when storing the boat.


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