Bearospace schooner Irene - Page 43 - RC Groups
Thread Tools
Sep 30, 2017, 11:19 AM
Registered User

A model of the Sparkle?


Gary, will you design a model of your home, Sparkle? Or at least tell us about her, please...?
Sign up now
to remove ads between posts
Oct 02, 2017, 07:09 PM
sailtails - YouTube
Gary Webb's Avatar

About "Sparkle"


Quote:
Originally Posted by glidin'n'slidin'
Gary, will you design a model of your home, Sparkle? Or at least tell us about her, please...?
Not likely to design a model of Sparkle, (already have the full size one), but I'll be happy to tell about her.
She is a George Buehler design called "Juno". She is 35-1/2 feet long on deck, single chine, double ended, full keel, cutter rigged. I built her of steel in Port Townsend Wa. beginning in March 1981 and launched in Feb 1983. She has been my home ever since. She has "traditional" rigging (arranged quite like schooner"Irene") and a Douglas Fir tree for a mast. A Lister diesel (old, model SL-2, - air cooled - hand crank) provides auxiliary power. Accommodations are bare bones simple, propane stove for cooking, wood stove for heat. Fresh water from tank arrives at galley sink by way of a hand pump. There is no head - a bucket works. A common automotive alternator is fitted to the diesel and provides 12 volt power for cabin lights and the vhf radio.
Sparkle can be seen in a youtube video from the good folks at "crossing south". She shows up from 5:14 to 15:04 in this video:
Sailing & Jams (24 min 47 sec)

The Schooner "Irene" is, in some ways, a reflection of my big boat experience - single chine - solid wood spars - simple rig -
Cheers, Gary
Oct 08, 2017, 10:03 AM
Registered User
Please give me more details about the blocks, double blocks, and single block w/becket. My most important question what are the aprox. sizes of these blocks? And what is the diameter of the different shrouds and halyards?
Last edited by borazslo; Oct 08, 2017 at 10:13 AM.
Oct 08, 2017, 10:22 AM
Registered User
Here is Gary's video again...
RC Sailboat Build Detail - DIY Blocks (9 min 53 sec)
Oct 08, 2017, 04:00 PM
Registered User
robcrusoe's Avatar

Blocks


I think the finish size is rather dependent on the diameter of the shrouds and halyards, both of which you mention. I changed the cordage a few times until I settled on 150lb dyneema for the shrouds and general rigging and 250lb for the halyards.

Making these is an exacting task, and steep learning curve, and in my case I made around 30 ( yes..30) before I settled on the finished version. Mine do tend to vary a bit in final dimensions and even a little in regards to shape, it will be up to the maker whether uniformity is paramount or that other than up close a casual looker wont notice any difference. The double blocks definitely need to be hefty.
The U shaped staple that has to go down the outside of the hole is very tricky, there is, in some areas, a lot of stress on those. There is not much body to the block there. the three sheeting blocks attached to the deck definitely are the most stressed since that is theo nly point where any have failed, so I did away with them.

Main thing is get started on them, it will be somewhat time consuming.
Oct 10, 2017, 02:32 AM
Registered User

Blocks


Thank you both for the answers. Based on the video and the suggestions I "cheated" and built my frist block with my small 3d printer. Still it was the easiest for me.I will try the wooden version on my second boat, but first make my first Irene float. And sail.
Oct 10, 2017, 04:11 PM
Registered User
robcrusoe's Avatar
Oh, definitely NOT cheating.. Irene is an Open Idea project and what you have done is simply marvelous. I did something similar when it came to the gaff forks. Making them out of timber was outside my ability so I just used slightly flexible black plastic sheet and bent the required angle using a careful application of heat from a paint stripper gun.
They continue to work just dandy and look a general part to the rigging style.


Since you are at this stage have you completed the hull? Surely you haven't done all THAT on the printer!

Any progress photos, yet?
Oct 10, 2017, 04:52 PM
Registered User
Having varnished up the fin box & inner hull and deck ,varnish drying and rainy day here in Cornwall thought the cosy workshop beckoned ,Looking at the rigging blocks decided to try and make as fullsize with running pully and spindle , Set up some 1/4" brass in the lathe ,and fitted drill ,form tool & parting off blade With all set up found I could produce five pullys in four minutes, (as per cocktail stick ) The spindel was a piece of 10g bronze welding rod ,Ten gauge is just over 1/8" or .128 thou so should be tight fit in a 1/8" drilled hole in the block (which it was ) As the pully was bored 1/8" .125 there was a need to turn down the first .200 thou so as pully would revolve .Pleased to say all worked as expected and no adhesive was necessary , All dimensions as per Gary's drwg
Only problem is wire for shackle is a bit to thick ,But all I have to hand at moment
Oct 11, 2017, 12:40 AM
Owner - Flying Models
A lovely detail, nicely done.
Did you put any lube in the pulley, or leave them dry? I'm thinking a coat of silicone grease might not go astray if it is not too late. Would be a shame to go to all the effort and have them seize.

Thayer
Oct 11, 2017, 03:02 AM
Registered User
Sure Thayer ,I did consider that ,and came to the conclusion that if they jambed then would be as per Gary's blocks ,Did NOT WANT silicone on the wood which will prevent varnish from adhearing , BUT as this is the prototype and am setting up for production run then maybe Varnish first before pressing in the pully and spindle, Must confess was quite surprised just how quick could be made once set up , Regards C/P
Oct 11, 2017, 10:38 AM
Owner - Flying Models
Good points, which I hadn't considered. They would be just like Gary's, but likely still with less friction. Prefinishing would be a good way to go, as you will not need to be nearly as careful with the brush and can ensure full coverage of the wood.

You've inspired me to consider doing the same when the time comes.

Thayer
Oct 12, 2017, 02:24 AM
Registered User
SA/RCFlyer's Avatar
Good news
I have managed to find 3.2mm ply and have taken the plunge and purchased the plans for EMMA too. Now to get everything printed and cut. So looking forward to this build something different for a change. Nervous as I have never done anything scale like before. Then again there is this thread with sooooo much help and ideas.
Oct 12, 2017, 06:03 PM
Registered User

You can build this boat!


Quote:
Originally Posted by SA/RCFlyer
Good news
I have managed to find 3.2mm ply and have taken the plunge and purchased the plans for EMMA too. Now to get everything printed and cut. So looking forward to this build something different for a change. Nervous as I have never done anything scale like before. Then again there is this thread with sooooo much help and ideas.
Great news! You and I represent those who can build and sail this model, learning as we go.
The only dumb question is the one we didn't ask
Please post your progress!
Oct 13, 2017, 06:49 AM
Registered User
From reading this thread and from other forums there are a number of skippers who are building and learning as they go with these plans.
Oct 13, 2017, 03:35 PM
Registered User
robcrusoe's Avatar

Next.. the Emma


Tugboat, I expect Glidin' meant something different than how it read as this thread would be stuck on page 2 if otherwise.

As the Molly G continues to sail like a dream, and receive plaudits galore by both passerby s and experienced rc sailboaters, it has certainly been worth all the hours, hard to assess but certainly for the Molly G, 250 +. Needn't be that long but I was a slowwww learner.

Now I've gone into partnership with a sailing mate and we are building two Emma style boats jointly. some of it, like cutting out main pieces, was done as a workshop, the rest will be mainly discussions and seeing what each does a bit differently. We intend to match race these two as well as cruise.

Having done the Irene the hard way (but not sorry about that) I can only urge anyone looking at either to do the Emma first. While it is a great boat in it's own right it is also much simpler to put together and the time spent on building it will come off that of doing likewise with the Irene. If you buy both plans you'll finish up doing both, for sure.
I had no intention of doing the Emma previously but that was just the romance of the Irene at the time.

I don't see a specific topic for the Emma and I guess that until and if it generates sufficient participants, and that it is much the same techniques, it may as well be included here. Up to Gary, I guess.

Anyway, here's my current progress on the Margie G, my version of an Emma. and yes, I have already jumped the gun and doing the deck first. The grey is primer, but it kind of appeals somewhat so I'm thinking grey will be the deck structure colour.


Thread Tools