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Jul 02, 2016, 12:53 AM
Cheers and beers!🍻
Quote:
Originally Posted by glidin'n'slidin'
Can't seem to avoid this from happening
Looks perfectly normal to me!
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Jul 02, 2016, 01:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glidin'n'slidin'
Can't seem to avoid this from happening
Yeah, I too hate it when somebody comes in and "cleans up" so that I can't find anything.
Jul 03, 2016, 12:17 AM
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Thread OP

operation of sail winch


The Hitec 785 winch servo is shown driving the winch line loop. Two Alpine Butterfly loops are tied in for attachment of the sheets. The line is braided nylon #18 twine and really doesn't twist during its movement. All knots are secured (I hope) with superglue.
Before activating the servo its travel endpoints were set really low to avoid it wrecking anything. Then the endpoints were adjusted to provide the shown amount of travel.
Sail winch operation in model sailboat IRENE (0 min 52 sec)
Jul 05, 2016, 10:19 PM
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Thread OP

under deck sheet guides


Gary's flared copper leads look so good but I couldn't find the tubing.
Hopefully this arrangement will be strong enough and free running enough.
I'm trying to set everything to be reachable when the deck is glued down.
I'm gluing blue ceramic beads into holes in doubled door-skin plywood. The beads seem nice and smooth for the braided nylon sheets with holes of ample size. I'm sanding them roughly to get the glues to hold.
Then I'm gluing them where it seems the sheets need to be guided to the winch line.
The mainsail sheet passes through a bead set into the deck, then through one attached to the aft deck beam. It then passes through one glued to the winch drum cover box. (first three photos)
The foresail sheet passes through two glued to the winch drum cover box. (photos 3 and 4)
The jib sheet drops through the starboard side of the deck and then passes through a bead set at angles onto the winch turning block cover box. (last two photos)
I'll be finishing these fittings with more reinforcement and glue.
Last edited by Paul~; Jul 05, 2016 at 10:21 PM. Reason: grammar improvement
Jul 09, 2016, 05:01 PM
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Thread OP

Hefty Irene


My boat is coming to almost 14 pounds without the ballast bulb. Oops
Jul 09, 2016, 08:45 PM
Cheers and beers!🍻
Is that weight including the aluminium keel? That alone will probably weigh @ 5lbs.

Are you weighing her with the...'Swag'...onboard?... Are you rum-running...?!

If that is the weight with the aluminium fin, it looks close to the specs with the lower (12lbs) bringing it to 26lbs.
See where she sits on the waterline. That should give a good indication.
If she does need to lose some weight, I would be tempted to enlarge the cutout in the fin keel, filling in with balsa epoxied and painted in place so as not to alter the centre of lateral resistance.
Aluminium weighs 1.56oz per cu inch

On the plus side, being heavier means not having to tie in a reef as soon as the plastic boats have too!

Best of luck and look fwd to seeing her launched!

Cheers, Jim.
Jul 13, 2016, 10:08 PM
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Preparing to close the hull


I'm making adjustments so the deck will lie on the bulkheads, looking at the clamping needed, and trying to foresee problems that will arise after the deck is glued down.
I've installed a Great Planes radio switch and charging plug bracket. It's on the cabin wall where it's easily accessed with the roof removed. I've also installed the Fly Sky receiver on the underside of the cabin roof. It has two extremely short antenna wires that are to be kept straight and at right angles to each other. I'm attaching the receiver with Velcro. The antennas are secured by passing them through a roof beam and holding the ends inside plastic tubes glued to the cabin ceiling. This seems as elevated a position as possible inside the hull. A range check will certainly be needed.
A pair of 5 x AA battery holders are coming to provide NiMH 4400 mah power at 6 volts. I'll create a wiring harness to provide the winch servo power straight from the batteries instead of via the receiver.
Jul 13, 2016, 11:12 PM
a.k.a. Bob Parks
bbbp's Avatar
You will not have any range problems with that receiver setup!

My twin antenna rx is buried deep in my Seawind and I can sail it as far as I can see which way the boat is pointing!

BP
Jul 14, 2016, 09:36 AM
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Thread OP

radio gear


The antennas slide into plastic tubes. The tubes are glued down with a bit of fiberglass cloth. Oops...those are magnets really close to those antennas.
Last edited by Paul~; Jul 14, 2016 at 10:48 PM. Reason: no photos
Jul 18, 2016, 01:38 AM
sailtails - YouTube
Gary Webb's Avatar

Satisfying Archimedes


Quote:
Originally Posted by glidin'n'slidin'
My boat is coming to almost 14 pounds without the ballast bulb. Oops
Sounds about right. Seems as though you have fairly closely followed the plans so I presume the aluminum fin is part of the 14 lbs. (fin itself is 3 lbs).
With 12 lbs of lead bulb, she would be 1 pound over the 25 lbs designed displacement. Not a problem, I promise. Trust me. (I'm far away)
My own boats have come out almost exactly to these figures, Bear, Crew member, batteries, and camera included. I have fitted minimal batteries (4 - AA) and have been happy to find they can last 8 + hrs of sailing.
I once mentioned "14 lbs of lead" in a video, not exactly accurate, for the aluminum fin was certainly part of that, and the precise weight of that fin w/bulb was 14 lbs 11 oz. My apologies if I have misled anyone.
All that said, I suggest that as the boat nears completion, trim the lead bulb to bring the total weight to about 26 lbs. Plus or minus a half pound will be fine. Fact is, an extra pound will sink her only about 1/8" (3 mm).
Cheers Paul, you're getting things done. Thanks again for sharing your experience with all of us....Gary
Jul 18, 2016, 09:46 PM
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Thread OP

sail stitching question


Gary, thanks for the clarification!
I'd like to ask about the sail design and stitching. I'm attaching a drawing where the edge of the sail is shown in cross section. I'm showing the bolt rope as a black dot and the polyester thread in brown.
Do you assemble and stitch as shown in number 1, number 2, or differently than them?
Is the bolt rope supposed to slide freely in a "tube" of cloth?
Is it supposed to be fastened along its length to the sail?
Having your input on these details makes me feel more like I know a bit about what I'm doing
Jul 18, 2016, 11:38 PM
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It's number three for mine.
Jul 19, 2016, 01:45 AM
sailtails - YouTube
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sail stitching answer


Hi Paul, Terry Smith got it right with his #3. That is to say the bolt rope is to slide freely in a "tube" of cloth and is to be secured only at the corners as shown in the sail making video. Take care when laying out to let both the cloth and the bolt rope be "relaxed" yet with slack removed, and secure the corners first, then with all corners secured, stitch up the lengths between. This is so that when the sails are bent (sailor talk) to the spars, the luff and foot can be pulled taut and the strain will be taken by the bolt rope rather than the cloth. Gotta say I am forever astounded at the way the internet allows us this far reaching closeness with others from all over the globe, why when I was a kid - - - - - - Gary
Last edited by Gary Webb; Jul 19, 2016 at 09:01 AM. Reason: Add photo
Jul 19, 2016, 06:26 PM
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The internet has made me multi-lingual. I am now fluent in English, Australian and American.
Jul 19, 2016, 09:37 PM
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Thread OP

Flewensea


Ain't that sumthin?


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