Thread Tools
Nov 25, 2015, 12:16 AM
Registered User
Thread OP
Discussion

Quad instead of SIM to learn to fly


I am very new to the hobby still. I bought a Super Cub S and went to the local approved park and got advice from the experienced guys. All of them told me to buy a SIM. I went to my LHS and I just couldn't justify spending $130 on a SIM. So, I bought a cheap Hubsan quad for $38 on Amazon. I practiced on the quad each day and I swear, the stick controls, sensitivity and response and feedback directly applied to learning to fly the Super Cub. I think it made for a great trainer. I am getting fairly competent on the Super Cub now and never used a SIM.
Sign up now
to remove ads between posts
Nov 25, 2015, 12:58 AM
Ultra_rc
This is a great simulator to learn to fly mini quads on, it works on mac and windows, and If you need help later if you build a mini quad there are more videos to help you on my channel, like fpv setups, fpv goggles some other stuff as well
Fpv free rider (4 min 9 sec)
Nov 25, 2015, 03:44 AM
Registered User
If a quad helps you (rather surprisingly) then go for it. But cost is not really the factor you're making it since there are several cheap or even free simulators which can teach new learners quite a bit. You don't have to buy the most expensive best-advertised simulators.

Steve
Nov 25, 2015, 04:20 AM
Registered User
Trisnpod's Avatar
I got an old version of Phoenix RC (I think it was Phoenix 3) off eBay for around 20 and upgraded it for free to the latest version. I practised on that for about half a year then when I next tried flying I was fine. That sim must have saved me at least 100!
I'm surprised you managed to learn on a quad, the stick movements are pretty different.
My advice would be to look on eBay and get a cheap sim that you can plug your own transmitter into. I would recommend Phoenix because it has mainly real models, you can use user created models and scenery and you can upgrade it to the latest version for free. Or just find a free/nearly free sim online. You can also get sims for the iPad or phone for free which are better than nothing, but it's better to use a real transmitter. A sim will be useful I. The future when you are practising 3d flying or more advanced planes.
Nov 25, 2015, 05:05 AM
Registered User
I bought a Blade MCX (micro co-axial copter if your unfamiliar) in '09 or '10 just for shits and giggles. Guy I worked with had one and I thought it looked fun. I flew the crap out of that thing for a year or so before I decided to pursue RC as a hobby. I had the orientation thing down cold after all that "stick time." Helicopters didn't float my boat so I taught myself to fly airplanes with a Micro T-28 and I think that because of the orientation practice, the micro heli flying was a value added experience. Maybe you found the same with the quad. I still don't have a sim but it's on the Christmas list as I didn't bring any airplanes with me when I moved to Hong Kong.......Good luck with the rest of your fixed wing flying!
Nov 25, 2015, 06:42 AM
Registered User
Chris_J's Avatar
Strange that you should say the the stick controls feels like your plane. I only recently started flying quads and I still struggle when flipping between quads and planes. I always forget to mix forward elevator stick with the throttle in order to gain forward momentum, as opposed to a plane which does this naturally with throttle! Sounds silly I know!

Flying a quad will teach you these skills that I can think are transferable to planes:

1. Orientation - except you'll be better at it, as you will also learn to fly backwards etc. with a quad, which you cannot do with a plane.

2. Co-ordinated turns - mixing the right amount of rudder with your aileron in order to get a nice looking turn. If your radio allows it, I'd recommend you use mixing in order to train yourself to use rudder on the left stick. I think your 3-channel will have rudder on the right?

3. Flaring on landing - slightly different with quads as you do this vertically, but same sort of timing required.

4. Balancing throttle to maintain consistent altitude.

5. The ground is hard and when you hit it, you always lose.

Hope you have fun with fixed wing and multi-rotors!
Nov 25, 2015, 06:49 AM
Registered User
flypaper 2's Avatar
Hard to tell which is better unless you tried both.

Gord.
Nov 25, 2015, 08:28 AM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by flypaper 2
Hard to tell which is better unless you tried both.
And of course no-one can possibly have learned to fly from scratch in two different ways...which is why these discussions will never end .

Steve
Nov 25, 2015, 02:08 PM
Bombs away! Err...landing
Ira NZ's Avatar
Hmmm, I suppose if you learn to fly a quad you're ahead when you try to learn to fly a plane. But if your only goal is to learn to fly a plane...Yeah, get a sim, or a cheap plane. Skip the quad.

If flying whatever is your goal, go with whatever.
Nov 25, 2015, 02:38 PM
Registered User
flypaper 2's Avatar
The quad does teach you a couple of import thing that pertain to both quads and planes, like flying towards you where some controls are reversed, and throttle management.

Gord.
Nov 25, 2015, 07:23 PM
Closed Account
To me they seem to fly nothing like each other I must fly one or the other after flying my quad it takes me while to be any good on my planes. May just be my brand of quad but you move stick to right it go's left.
Nov 25, 2015, 08:03 PM
Registered User
shonmac's Avatar
You can try Clearview for $40 . It is a very good simulator.

Hubsan makes nice fliers.
Nov 25, 2015, 09:39 PM
Bombs away! Err...landing
Ira NZ's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by papadwight
May just be my brand of quad but you move stick to right it go's left.
Can't tell if you have your channels reversed or you're making some kind of obscure comment.
Nov 26, 2015, 04:53 PM
Registered User
I started with a quad and later got interested in planes. I suppose the quad may have helped in some respects but I still practiced for hours on a sim before flying a plane. $130 is cheap, I've seen plenty of guys wreck multiple planes each costing more than that trying to learn to fly.
Nov 30, 2015, 07:37 PM
Registered User
quote: "$130 is cheap, I've seen plenty of guys wreck multiple planes each costing more than that trying to learn to fly."

Yea, I have one of the top-of-line sims, the Phoenix 5 which cost me $160, and I still crashed (crash) a lot. Anticipating the crashes, is why I chose the CTH Albatross for my first training plane.

I have "destroyed" it probably dozens of times, and so far my expenses for repairs are about $2 for 3mm x .5 x 20mm screws with washers and locknuts for the pod engine mount, a 77 cent propeller because I didn't have the prop saver set up properly, and about $2 worth of glue sticks for the hot melt glue gun. I got my plane through Flying Trainer with a parts kit with all of the parts provided and (mostly) soldered for you, which with batteries and a nice charger came to about $315. I use the DX4e transmitter that came with my sim, and it works fine. If you have enough experience (I did not, but do now) to know what you need and how to set up the electrics and electronics yourself, you could probably save $50 or so by buying electronics, motor, batteries, etc. separately from Hobby King or similar internet warehouse.

Even paying for the knowledge that Flying Trainer provides with their parts kit, I figure it is still a lot cheaper than buying and crashing several less robust trainers.

For more info, you can look at the thread "***EPP Tough - The Best Slow Flyers on the Planet***".


Quick Reply
Message:

Thread Tools