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Aug 02, 2015, 06:04 PM
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Mini-HowTo

MassiveRC ZMR PDB


MassiveRC ZMR 250 PDB Instructions

These instructions are written with the premise that you have some basic soldering and electro-mechanical skills. It isnít too difficult to install but you should plan out the installation of your components and check clearances before trying to install anything. Itís important to use flux (not just rosin core solder but a have a tub of low corrosion flux) on all your connections. Higher heat may be required for some connections such as the ESC power leads and especially the LiPo battery connector. It's also very important after each soldering step to check your work for shorts. As with any instructions you use, ALWAYS read them from beginning to end before attempting any work.

Thanks to Michael for also doing a pictorial:

http://imgur.com/a/Cucf8

The benefits of our ZMR PDB is that it comes with 5V and 12V regulators already included as well as buzzer and headers so they're no need to purchase additional Pololu regulators. Each regulator can handle 3A load. If you have ESCs with BEC circuits you could use them instead of the provided regulator, but the provides ones will produce cleaner power in addition to a 12V tap so you should use them instead. It's very important you don't try to use both your ESC BEC and the included regulators at the same time. If for some reason you don't want to use the regulators, then leave the solder bridges intact.

This diagram shows the locations of the solder bridges that must be removed before installing the regulators. Use a solder sucker or wick to remove the bridges (notice the use of flux):



In addition, if you're not using an OSD, you must install pins and jumper in the diagram above. Finally the direction of the regulators is shown by the large outlined red arrows.

Here is a close up of the 5V bridge



and after the bridge is removed:

:

The 12V bridge:



12V bridge removed:



We're now going to prep our 5V and 12V pads by applying a little flux:



And putting down a small solder ball at each corner:



Apply some flux to the regulator contacts. You can put some solder in the through holes now or add the solder when you mount the board:



5V regulator positioned into place (make sure you have the in/out positioned correction as show in the pictures):



Side shot after it's soldered into place:



Both regulators soldered into place:



If you got the 5V and 12 volt regulators mixed up, you can remove the glue locking the adjustable potentiometer and adjust the voltages as necessary.

We're now going to install the female headers for the FCB for an Acro pin layout. When cutting the headers you're going to sacrifice 1 pin hole when you cut it so if you need a 6 pin hole, cut it 7 holes wide. Don't worry, you have 2 sets of female headers, which is enough for screw ups. If using a CC3D board you'll install the headers on the CC3D through holes. Use tape to secure them in place and make sure they're square with the board before soldering into place. Remember, flux is your friend:



Buzzer and Micro Mini OSD header installed:

.

I've installed the TX/RX BT header and here's a trick to installing the pins onto your Acro FCB; insert the pins into the female header first:



and then mount your board and then solder the pins on. This will ensure that when you insert\remove your FCB, it does so easily as the pins will be aligned:



If you're using the SPRacing F3, don't install the 3x2 or 2x1 pin headers. The SPR F3 board will sit slightly askew from the 30.5 mm mounting holes if you enable Servo Tilt which moves motor outputs 2 positions out (I'll have to verify this with Dominic). The pins alone should be enough to hold the board in place with maybe a zip tie and tubing to help secure the other side.

To clarify: Even if you don't plan on using Servo Tilt, install your SPRacing F3 in this configuration and enable Servo Tilt in Cleanflight. If you do plan on using servo tilt, install headers top side so you can plug your servo tilt leads.



Adding flux to the battery pads:



Some solder:



There's been some concern about creating a tension relief with the pads where they are. You can zip tie the battery lead to one of the mainframe standoffs or here's another solution. Install the battery lead facing inwards:



Zip tie it to the frame and then fold it back over:



Another zip tie holds it in place. You can see I've added the servo lead pins for the ESC servo leads and VTX and camera 3 pins headers. If you want to play it safe, remove the center pins so you don't risk running BEC and supplied regulators at the same time:



Now would be a good time to do a check for shorts and then hook up your LiPo to verify regulator output (nothing else hooked up). If the LEDs come on then you know the 12V is probably OK:




For installing the ESCs, you can mount them on the arms or mount them inboard. I plan on mounting mine inboard so what I've done is feed each ESCs power via the opposite side's ESC power pads. Just make sure you plug your signal wires into the proper header and make sure the signal wire (white wire) matches up with the S(ignal) on each ESC servo header:



This should be enough to get you going with the PDB. If you're using a micro mini OSD here's how it is mounted:



For general assembly of the ZMR frame itself, please see the ZMR thread: https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show....php?t=2180331

Concerns about shorts:

As far as shorts around the standoff holes like in other ZMR PDBS, The bolt holes have an inner copper trace that is neutral, but far from the stock round standoffs so it's not a concern. The battery strap and camera mounting slots have positive trace near the edges but not right up to it. The battery strap doesn't concern me as most will run the strap through the bottom plate slots if they're even running the flight battery below (most run up top) and battery straps aren't conductive anyways. The camera mounting plate slots, if you're using the stock FPV camera plate it wouldn't hurt to file the bottom tabs down slightly so they don't rub the coating off on the PDB.

Basically, the only concern I have with shorts is if you're using the stock FPV camera plate. I would file the tabs down a little so they don't rub the coating off the PDB (the valleys that sit directly on the PDB face, not the positioning tabs).

This shows where the camera plate can rub through the protective coating on the PDB (red shaded area):



You want to file down or insulate (thin silicon tubing) the recessed tabs shown below:

Last edited by MassiveOverkill; Feb 26, 2016 at 10:06 AM.
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Aug 02, 2015, 07:27 PM
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Aug 03, 2015, 10:11 PM
Mike
Is the camera power 5 or 12 volts? Is the 5 volt power filtered?
Last edited by muidaq; Aug 03, 2015 at 10:33 PM.
Aug 03, 2015, 10:28 PM
Mike
Also, is there enough exposed material on the bottom for the esc's to connect to? I'd like to sandwich mine.
Aug 04, 2015, 08:01 AM
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Camera power is from the 12V regulator feed which is adjustable. Both 5V and 12V are filtered. The ESC pads have through-holes so you can feed the ESC wires from underneath and solder to the pads up top.
Aug 04, 2015, 08:44 PM
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Are you building with the micro osd or just showing that pic for reference? I'm trying to get osd plus telemetry with the d4r-ii but have read a lot of different info about having to disconect the OSD while using the usb for cleanflight and setting frisky to softserial to get everything to work together. What's your thoughts on this massive?
Aug 04, 2015, 09:32 PM
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I installed it just for reference. Frankly my beeper has always worked fine for me to let me know when LiPo voltage was low and I know how many laps I can go before I run low. I find OSD distracting myself. As a result, I'm not as schooled on OSD setups but I believe you're correct. You shouldn't have a problem if you're using the SPRacingF3 board however.
Aug 04, 2015, 09:46 PM
Mike
Should the 12 volt regulator be installed even for a 3s setup?
Aug 04, 2015, 09:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MassiveOverkill
I installed it just for reference. Frankly my beeper has always worked fine for me to let me know when LiPo voltage was low and I know how many laps I can go before I run low. I find OSD distracting myself. As a result, I'm not as schooled on OSD setups but I believe you're correct. You shouldn't have a problem if you're using the SPRacingF3 board however.
Thanks for the quick response. And yes I totally agree with you on the beeper. Im not using the spracingf3 fc, and with this pdb I figured I'd try to utilize all of its features. But like you I'm not to keen on the osd setups either. I do have my board setup as well as the micro osd but that's about it for now.
Aug 04, 2015, 09:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by muidaq
Should the 12 volt regulator be installed even for a 3s setup?
If it was me I'd still use it, it's good to have if/when you decide to jump to 4s. And either way it wouldn't hurt anything.
Aug 05, 2015, 08:59 AM
Registered User
My second ZMR board but first ever built in PDB with all the goodies. I'm new to filtering for FPV. I read the comment above that the 5v and 12v is filtered. Will this still apply if I'm not using the 12v regulator?

I'm running 3S power for FPV gear, and powering my FC via ESCs.
Aug 05, 2015, 07:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crispy12
My second ZMR board but first ever built in PDB with all the goodies. I'm new to filtering for FPV. I read the comment above that the 5v and 12v is filtered. Will this still apply if I'm not using the 12v regulator?

I'm running 3S power for FPV gear, and powering my FC via ESCs.
Yes, as long as you leave the 12v bridge in place, and use the 12v power rail.

Most cams/vtx have a fairly wide operating range on the lower end. I suggest using the 12v regulator even running 3S, and adjust the "12V" regulator to about 9v. The regulator will offer a bit more filtering.


Also, I suggest "doming" the LED's , and their resistors (beside the LED's) with some epoxy like in the pic below. This will keep them from getting knocked off as it is very easy to do in a crash.
Last edited by IndyFPV; Aug 05, 2015 at 07:22 PM.
Aug 05, 2015, 09:59 PM
Mike
The micro minim osd is a bit tricky to solder up.
Aug 06, 2015, 06:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IndyFPV
Also, I suggest "doming" the LED's , and their resistors (beside the LED's) with some epoxy like in the pic below. This will keep them from getting knocked off as it is very easy to do in a crash.
Thanks. I'll try this later on!

Will it work with hot glue?

I'm also using Super Simple OSD which requires a 12v and ground connection. Any spare pins that I can tap power from, or should I just solder it to the battery leads?
Aug 06, 2015, 07:21 AM
Mike
Hot glue doesn't dry nearly as clear as epoxy. I wouldn't suggest it.


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