Hangar 9 Cessna 182 ARF - De-building and customizing - RC Groups
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Jun 13, 2015, 12:57 PM
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Build Log

Hangar 9 Cessna 182 ARF - De-building and customizing


When I bought this plane my plan was just to follow the ARF philosophy - Get it into the air as quickly as possible. However, the more I thought about it the more I felt the urge to customize it and make it into a true scale model. The Hostetler Cessna 170 and 195 build logs in this forum are definitely to blame for at least some of my motivation.

I'm new at this scale building thing so a lot of this is a learn-as-I-go process. The next project might be a Hostetler Beechcraft Bonanza so this will be a learning tool for that build.

This model will be powered by a Saito 220 Golden Knight, which is substantially more than most have put into one of these. My reasoning for this is two-fold: One, I already had this engine on the shelf. Two, and more importantly, this will end up being a float plane. More than that, it will be an amphibious float plane with retracts based on a set of Aerocet 3500 floats. Between that and the scale modifications it will weigh a decent amount more than the 16.5-18.5 lbs Hangar 9 expects it to come in at. I figure something more like 25 lbs is a realistic number for my plane.

The main scale upgrade is going to be the cockpit. So far the passenger and baggage doors are cut out. I'm a little restricted here because the floor of the model is higher than it would be in the real plane so I had to cut the bottom of the door a bit higher than it should be. I'm debating cutting the window frames so that they will be able to open like the real thing.

Over the last day or so I put together a CAD model of a Garmin G1000-equipped Skylane instrument panel and a friend with a 3D printer printed it out for me. I'll trial fit this in the plane and after that look into back-lighting the screens.

I've also had him print off the prototype of the nose landing gear for the floats. The retract mechanism is based off the full scale version and seems to work well. I'm nearly done the design of the mains so those will be ready for testing shortly.

Externally I will mainly be adding small touches like the grab handles and steps used to fuel the plane, antennae, new paint job to match a later model year...

Like I said before this is the first time I've tried my hand at a build this detailed so I'm sure I'll hit roadblocks and ask for advice from the folks here.
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Jun 14, 2015, 09:59 PM
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Test fit the printed instrument panel in the plane. I gotta say, having the doors cut out makes access a breeze.
Jun 21, 2015, 07:38 AM
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Finished the prototype of the main gear. Now I just need to pick up the air system to run it. I also need to order the actuators for the nose gear which are a custom setup - hard to find an off the shelf set with 3.495" stroke and a threaded end.
Jun 22, 2015, 11:34 AM
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Wow !


Really, really nice work, Crazy Pilot !!!

I would say your skills are far beyond those of most ARF builders. Thanks for sharing.

Looking forward to seeing this project come together.

Joe
Jun 22, 2015, 04:51 PM
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Aryana's Avatar
Cool build!
Sep 14, 2015, 08:39 AM
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So progress has been slow on the Cessna. Who knew being a first time home owner was so much work!

As part of my quest to add more scale touches to the Cessna I bought a set of Robart Fowler hinges. These allow you to mimic the movement of the real 182's Fowler flaps which travel back as they deploy. I built a quick ply mockup to see how they come together before committing to cutting holes in my wings and flaps and I'm certainly glad I did. Several problems became clear:

-The fit between the plastic tracks and the bushings is extremely sloppy.
-The tracks appear to be laser cut, and being plastic this resulted in a raised melt bead around all of the cuts which Robart didn't bother to deal with. These raised edges snag on the steel brackets as they slide.
-The slop, combined with a single point actuation, results in the flap skewing as it's pushed or pulled.

My first order of business will be to 3D print a new set of tracks with a tighter fit to the slide bushings. Once that's done I can re-do the mockup and see if that solves the problem or if the single point actuation is really just a deal breaker.
Sep 14, 2015, 11:29 AM
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Aryana's Avatar
The location of the control horn for the single point actuation is critical. It should be located equidistant from both hinges, and the control horn has to extend up towards the top skin of the flap for it to function correctly.

Mine came out true to scale and functions flawlessly after figuring this out.

Fowler flaps on Hostetler 170B (0 min 11 sec)
Last edited by Aryana; Sep 14, 2015 at 11:53 AM.
Sep 15, 2015, 10:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aryana
The location of the control horn for the single point actuation is critical. It should be located equidistant from both hinges, and the control horn has to extend up towards the top skin of the flap for it to function correctly.
That's what I suspected. Unfortunately Hangar 9 didn't design the plane with this kind of setup in mind so the servo is offset toward the inside of the flap (around the 1/3 point of the flap), and since my plane is an ARF moving the servo means opening up the wing.

I'll see if my modified hinges make things easier but if not that will have to be the fallback plan.

The flaps look great on your Cessna, a definite improvement over the simple hinges most use.
Nov 01, 2017, 07:17 PM
Eternal Noob
Scotty68's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crazy_pilot
When I bought this plane my plan was just to follow the ARF philosophy - Get it into the air as quickly as possible. However, the more I thought about it the more I felt the urge to customize it and make it into a true scale model. The Hostetler Cessna 170 and 195 build logs in this forum are definitely to blame for at least some of my motivation.

I'm new at this scale building thing so a lot of this is a learn-as-I-go process. The next project might be a Hostetler Beechcraft Bonanza so this will be a learning tool for that build.

This model will be powered by a Saito 220 Golden Knight, which is substantially more than most have put into one of these. My reasoning for this is two-fold: One, I already had this engine on the shelf. Two, and more importantly, this will end up being a float plane. More than that, it will be an amphibious float plane with retracts based on a set of Aerocet 3500 floats. Between that and the scale modifications it will weigh a decent amount more than the 16.5-18.5 lbs Hangar 9 expects it to come in at. I figure something more like 25 lbs is a realistic number for my plane.

The main scale upgrade is going to be the cockpit. So far the passenger and baggage doors are cut out. I'm a little restricted here because the floor of the model is higher than it would be in the real plane so I had to cut the bottom of the door a bit higher than it should be. I'm debating cutting the window frames so that they will be able to open like the real thing.

Over the last day or so I put together a CAD model of a Garmin G1000-equipped Skylane instrument panel and a friend with a 3D printer printed it out for me. I'll trial fit this in the plane and after that look into back-lighting the screens.

I've also had him print off the prototype of the nose landing gear for the floats. The retract mechanism is based off the full scale version and seems to work well. I'm nearly done the design of the mains so those will be ready for testing shortly.

Externally I will mainly be adding small touches like the grab handles and steps used to fuel the plane, antennae, new paint job to match a later model year...

Like I said before this is the first time I've tried my hand at a build this detailed so I'm sure I'll hit roadblocks and ask for advice from the folks here.
I recently purchased this very plane second hand and would love get a set of plans for floats. Are you designing yours from scratch or are you altering some existing plans you've found?
Scotty68
ps. I don't need them amphibious.


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