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May 25, 2015, 11:00 AM
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Do I dare? 2m thermal glider field size.


Hi guys, I've almost always got vultures circling over my house/yard/flying area and I'm dying to try and fly a thermal ship here. The landing "strips" I have ( 3 depending on wind direction) are 125, 195. and 225 feet with the thinnest area about 40 foot on the middle sized one. This is my main flying area but I do have a field close by where size is not an issue I just don't like to have to drive anywhere to fly if possible. Outside of the landing area I have there are 15ish foot high trees I need to drop down past which is not any sort of problem with any of the planes I currently fly. I have never flown a "real glider" before and would either be launching with a mini hi start, or maybe even off the roof lol, for some reason I think it may be producing the heat for there buzzards but probably not- I just have to assume they are there and circling all the time because of the thermals right? We aren't talking like once a week we are talking like all spring-summer long when the sun is out. There are usually between 3 and a dozen. I do live in a semi-rural neighborhood and they have been here as long as I can remember.

Planes I'm considering are all balsa- Gentle Lady, Chrysalis2m, possibly MM jester- I'm know they're all different types obviously but I haven't ironed that out yet. What is important is being able to get this thing up and down safely.

Edit: The largest plane I currently fly in this area has a 68 inch wingspan.

Any advice welcome and thanks.
Last edited by 5 oclock charlie; May 25, 2015 at 11:04 AM. Reason: added info
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May 25, 2015, 11:27 AM
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craigrrr's Avatar
Charlie:

I think it is doable with a two meter RES (rudder/elevator/spoilers) sailplane.
The spoilers are essential for killing lift and dropping into your LZ.
But maybe make the spoilers a little oversized, maybe four rib spacings wide and maybe an inch high.
Spoilers are easy to install. I use (2) each HS-55 servos (around $9.00 each) and use the actual servo arm to contact the lower surface of the spoiler (no linkage).

Spoilers are also great to extract you from big boomers that the buzzards like to ride.

Craig
May 25, 2015, 11:37 AM
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hog2soar's Avatar
Charlie

I would recommend the 2M Chrysalis. Only because I have one and know how it flies. I made mine electric. That's something you might think of.

Eddie
May 25, 2015, 11:38 AM
Going in circles.
GliderJim's Avatar
Them's tight quarters. It could be done, but it's going to be a bit of a challenge. My concerns would be the hi start parachute coming down where you don't want it to (trees?) and landing a glider with no spoilers in that small of a space. They tend to glide a long way when built correctly.

Congrats hog2soar on your 1000th post.
May 25, 2015, 12:10 PM
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Thread OP
Wow guys thanks for the quick responses!
Quote:
Originally Posted by craigrrr
Charlie:

I think it is doable with a two meter RES (rudder/elevator/spoilers) sailplane.
The spoilers are essential for killing lift and dropping into your LZ.
But maybe make the spoilers a little oversized, maybe four rib spacings wide and maybe an inch high.
Spoilers are easy to install. I use (2) each HS-55 servos (around $9.00 each) and use the actual servo arm to contact the lower surface of the spoiler (no linkage).

Spoilers are also great to extract you from big boomers that the buzzards like to ride.

Craig
Ok so spoilers are definitely a must.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hog2soar
Charlie
I would recommend the 2M Chrysalis. Only because I have one and know how it flies. I made mine electric. That's something you might think of.

Thanks hog, I wanna stay away from the power, Ive got 8 powered planes flying now, I want this one to be no cheating allowed.

Eddie
Chrysalis is definitely a possible, how difficult was the build? I've got over a dozen balsa builds under my belt, but none were relatively difficult really, all but maybe 2 were laser cut and those 2 were clancy bees. Also how is the durability of that wing without any sheeting on it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by GliderJim
Them's tight quarters. It could be done, but it's going to be a bit of a challenge. My concerns would be the hi start parachute coming down where you don't want it to (trees?) and landing a glider with no spoilers in that small of a space. They tend to glide a long way when built correctly.

Congrats hog2soar on your 1000th post.
Yea -from what craig said above spoilers will be a must, they don't scare me any though. The "trees" are basically some huge juniper bushes that are that tall but they can be a force to be reckoned with hehe retrieving the parachute would be a non issue- next to them is a flat bare 2 acre field with a treeline of about 35 feet high- I know this because that's how much inch and a half pvc it takes to get a plane out of the top of the highest one.

Any other 2m balsa gliders I should be looking at? No arfs or rtf.
May 25, 2015, 12:32 PM
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hog2soar's Avatar
Charlie,

The Chrysalis is not that difficult of a build. Especially seeing how you have building experience. In fact the Chrysalis was designed with the beginner in mind ( not that your a beginner) and there's a ton of info here on RCG as well as on DJ Aerotech's site. And if you have any problem or question just ask Don Stackhouse.

Oh, and the Chrysalis does have spoilers.

All my planes I fly now are 3M or 3M+ and are all electric. They fly just as good as a pure sailplane in my opinion. I only use the motor as a launch mechanism, then shut it off and soar. It seems to me it would be a perfect use for your situation. One thing about the electric if you do come in too low over the trees or your landing is too long, just power up for a couple seconds.

If Don ever finishes his 3M Chrysalis design I will buy it in a heart beat.

I would sell you mine at a very good price. It's like new. I just re covered the wing and tail feathers. But it's too big to ship without cutting the wing in half.

Eddie
Last edited by hog2soar; May 25, 2015 at 12:41 PM.
May 25, 2015, 12:40 PM
Registered User
We have trees in our field, I'd recommend that you attached the parachute with a clip, that way when the line drapes over a tree/large bush you can disconnect the parachute and then pull the line back without tearing up the parachute.
May 25, 2015, 01:28 PM
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Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by hog2soar
Charlie,

The Chrysalis is not that difficult of a build. Especially seeing how you have building experience. In fact the Chrysalis was designed with the beginner in mind ( not that your a beginner) and there's a ton of info here on RCG as well as on DJ Aerotech's site. And if you have any problem or question just ask Don Stackhouse.

Oh, and the Chrysalis does have spoilers.

All my planes I fly now are 3M or 3M+ and are all electric. They fly just as good as a pure sailplane in my opinion. I only use the motor as a launch mechanism, then shut it off and soar. It seems to me it would be a perfect use for your situation. One thing about the electric if you do come in too low over the trees or your landing is too long, just power up for a couple seconds.

If Don ever finishes his 3M Chrysalis design I will buy it in a heart beat.

I would sell you mine at a very good price. It's like new. I just re covered the wing and tail feathers. But it's too big to ship without cutting the wing in half.

Eddie
Thanks for the advice Eddie, the Chrysalis is definitely in the running, esp since he offers both powered and unpowered fuse- I can do both and just swap the wings, but I'll be doing the non powered first if I decide its the one. What do you think about the leading edge with no sheeting? That's definitely a concern of mine.

Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankS
We have trees in our field, I'd recommend that you attached the parachute with a clip, that way when the line drapes over a tree/large bush you can disconnect the parachute and then pull the line back without tearing up the parachute.
That's a great tip Frank- most likely the first time that happened I would have dragged the chute out of the other side and cut it lol. I can hit the top of the near tree line with a 10 foot stick of pvc and hook the chute from the good side if it does.
May 25, 2015, 02:05 PM
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craigrrr's Avatar
Concerning your desire for both power and non-power, I would recommend that you build only one fuselage. Build it for power, mount the motor, but leave off the prop when flying pure.

You will be adding almost no weight with the electrified fuselage. You can use a smaller capacity LiPo when flying pure.

Personally, all of my sailplanes are unpure. I also have a micro field, making a high start somewhat difficult. But the main reason is that I am a lazy old man who is now addicted to e-sailplanes.

Craig
May 25, 2015, 02:31 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by craigrrr
Concerning your desire for both power and non-power, I would recommend that you build only one fuselage. Build it for power, mount the motor, but leave off the prop when flying pure.

You will be adding almost no weight with the electrified fuselage. You can use a smaller capacity LiPo when flying pure.

Personally, all of my sailplanes are unpure. I also have a micro field, making a high start somewhat difficult. But the main reason is that I am a lazy old man who is now addicted to e-sailplanes.

Craig
Well building 2 fuses is no big deal for me, I'd rather have a clean plane- at one point I had 4 different variations of the slow stick, 3 of them were balsa builds but all had a different job, and I'm not totally set on the Chrysalis yet either. I am however seeing how scarce 2m balsa kits are getting what a bummer- I think I've come across less than a half dozen.
As it sits the GL and Chrysalis are the only ones in the mix- the Jester will definitely have to wait for some other day- the Stevensaero one looks great, but its too spendy for my first real glider.
May 25, 2015, 03:42 PM
Registered User
Not sure if this one is on your list or available in the US http://www.dbsportandscale.com/rookie-major-6509-p.asp
May 25, 2015, 03:57 PM
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Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankS
Not sure if this one is on your list or available in the US http://www.dbsportandscale.com/rookie-major-6509-p.asp
It wasn't but it is now, I'll definitely check it out- it looks kinda like the jester.
May 25, 2015, 07:08 PM
WBE
WBE
White Fang
WBE's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5 oclock charlie
Hi guys, I've almost always got vultures circling over my house/yard/flying area and I'm dying
Well that explains the vultures always circling over you.
May 25, 2015, 07:25 PM
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hog2soar's Avatar
I agree with Craig about the electric, then leaving the prop off to make it pure. But we're a couple old dudes.

You will probably have to add weight in the nose anyway, so why not use the motor for the weight and you can have both.

Here's a picture of a plane I just scratch built and finished this weekend. It has a motor, but without the prop it's pretty slick.

Eddie
May 25, 2015, 07:48 PM
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Don Stackhouse's Avatar
The Chrysalis leading edge is a hardwood dowel, very durable, but easy to build. We have diagonal bracing on the inboard wing panels of the 2-meter to get sufficient torsional stiffness without needing leading edge sheeting (something beginners often have trouble with). The rib shapes include individually designed corrections to compensate for covering sag. I don't know of anyone else going to the trouble in the engineering phase (and it is considerable) to do that.

The Chrysalis uses much thinner airfoils with a better L/D than typical older designs, and as a result has substantially more range and penetration than the old "gasbag floaters", but without sacrificing low speed performance.

Early test flights demonstrated that spoilers would be manditory in any sort of constricted flying area, so we made them standard equipment. They are quite large (5 rib bays on each side) and very effective. If you wanted even more spoiler authority you could extend them further inboard, but then they would start blanking the tail when opened, causing an excessive pitch-down trim change. Quite honestly I've never heard of anyone needing any more than the stock spoilers, they are quite powerful.

We do offer separate wing kits and fuselage+tail kits. This was originally intended to help in major repair situations, but it's also very popular with folks who want to have both the pure sailplane and the electric versions. Many customers get the full kit for one version and the fuselage+tail kit for the other.


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