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Jun 10, 2017, 12:18 PM
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meatbomber's Avatar
Ha Brooks there we are 2 have not sailed in years skippers

I think the servo thing might be due to a) large sail areas b) Neville sailing in winds where others have already packed up 10Kts ago c) the weight doesn't matter as he has always cargo carrying hulls and anyway needs loads of ballast.
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Jun 11, 2017, 07:31 AM
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Gammon Iron's Avatar
Really enjoy seeing Nev's work!!

Ewan MacColl & A.L. Lloyd - South Australia (sea shanty) (2 min 21 sec)
Jun 11, 2017, 05:06 PM
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i think i'm gonna throw up........
Jun 11, 2017, 07:07 PM
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Bill Zebb's Avatar
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Brooks I passed your questions along to Nev and here is his reply:

I'm happy to respond to Brooks' questions, as follows.

1.I only use the multiplying pulley system for the braces. It gives me enough movement to get the yards to within 30deg of the hull's centerline, which is good enough to achieve good progress to windward. I do also attach some of the braces in from the ends of the yardarms, which also helps.

2.On most of my square-riggers, I operate the after two masts' yards with one servo, and it works quite adequately, but I don't get as much bracing travel on those masts as I do on masts with individual control. Therefore, on my last model, "Queen Margaret", and this one, I have individual control of each square-rigged mast. It does give more movement, and I also enjoy it for it's own sake. It is nice to be able to "back the main yards", to heave to slowly, as well. It doesn't alter the way in which tacking is achieved, with all the yards, except those on the foremast swinging together. Several famous windjammers could get their yards "abox", so I am well aware of the phenomenon.

3."Stacking", or overlapping of servos allows me to get in the two servos required to operate main and mizzen yards individually on this model. The other features below deck are simple practicalities, required to get the job done.

4.I have independent control of the spanker, via a separate servo, on all my boats. I like to think it helps me go about. On three of my boats I also have separate control of the two outer jibs, usually the outer jib and the flying jib, using micro servos, but I only did it as a bit of fun. I don't think it helps maneuvering much!
Jun 11, 2017, 09:24 PM
Damp and Dizzy member
Brooks's Avatar
Thanks, Bill, and please pass along my thanks to Nev also. All makes sense, which is of course what I'd expect, given Nev's experience in building and operating many multi-masted models.
Jul 01, 2017, 04:09 AM
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Bill Zebb's Avatar
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Here are some pics of Nev's progress on Mount Stewart. Beautiful work !
Jul 01, 2017, 09:24 AM
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Brooks's Avatar
Thanks for the photos Bill & Nev.

Nev gets excellent yard-swing, even with rigged shrouds. Looks like he has a brass collar on the mast (for lowest 4 yards), which probably has a yard hanger extension forward. Getting the yards away from the mast would allow the yards to clear the shrouds on a beat. That's a better, more authentic, solution than my "leaving the shrouds off" method.
Jul 24, 2017, 09:11 AM
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Bill Zebb's Avatar
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Just received these pictures of Nev Wades magnificent Mount Stewart under way !
Jul 24, 2017, 09:32 AM
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pretty impressive!.......
Jul 24, 2017, 10:21 AM
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Brooks's Avatar
Magnificent sight, makes me wish the oil would run out sooner :-)

I notice he even has a couple sailors aloft. They are a long way up! The foot ropes do exactly like he shows, btw. On a long yard, the first sailor out, if short in stature, will be unable to drape his body over the yard. But as the rest of the aloft crew eases their way onto the footropes, the rope tightens, and short guys will be elevated into a useful working position. On a short yard, the opposite happens - enough men on the yard, and all are elevated too far for comfort :-)

Congratulations, Nev, on another beautiful square-rigger build. And thanks for posting the photos, Bill.
Last edited by Brooks; Jul 24, 2017 at 10:26 AM.
Jul 24, 2017, 10:28 AM
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thanks brooks ...i always wondered about that......and i wondered what the sailors did without the footropes.....i don't think there were any on the ship i'm building........i'm tempted to add some out of compassion
Aug 14, 2017, 10:17 PM
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Bill Zebb's Avatar
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Nev Wade has made another terrific square rigger video. This time his beautiful Mount Stewart is put through her paces with historical information about her included.

RC Square-rigger, "Mount Stewart" (10 min 10 sec)
Aug 15, 2017, 06:55 AM
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Gammon Iron's Avatar
Nev has again given us a video to drool over. He certainly has a productive ship yard! I admire the scale size he builds...big enough to sail well and small enough to travel well.

Maybe he needs to train a few skippers to be able to video several of his models sailing at the same time...on video.
Aug 15, 2017, 10:49 AM
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Bill Zebb's Avatar
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Would love to see that myself. I think there is a shortage of skippers who know how to run one of these vessels. Let's hope it happens someday !
Aug 15, 2017, 05:41 PM
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Bill Zebb's Avatar
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Some specifications on the Mount Stewart. She is 48 inches on deck and has a beam of 6.69 inches. The keel weighs in at 15 lbs. Looks like just the perfect size to me.


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